Lower-level Programs

Table of contents

Indigenous Services Canada (ISC) was established as per the Orders in Council, effective November 30, 2017. The 2017−18 ISC Departmental Results Report includes the full results and narrative for the programs that belong to ISC.

Note that the financial and human resources presented in the ISC DRR only covers the period of November 30, 2017 to March 31, 2018. ISC had no planned resources for fiscal year 2017−18 or actual resources for previous fiscal years.

* Programs for which elements have been split between CIRNAC and ISC.

** Programs formerly with Health Canada, for which all elements are now fully delivered by ISC.

Strategic Outcome: The Government

Support good governance, rights and interests of Indigenous peoples

Program: Governance and Institutions of Government*

Sub-Program: First Nation Governments

Description

This sub-program supports the core operations and capacity development of First Nations governments, including the professional development of their personnel. Support for community development and capacity building is through collaborative, coordinated and targeted community-driven investments, leveraging partnership wherever possible. Funding is provided to support the costs of core government functions such as the holding of elections, law-making and enforcement, financial management, general administration, and executive leadership. In addition, the sub-program provides advice and support to First Nations on governance matters, and develops and implements legislation and policies that support the modernization of governance frameworks and transparent and accountable governance, while simultaneously overseeing the discharge of the Department's statutory and regulatory obligations in respect of governance processes under the Indian Act. Activities include — but are not limited to — assistance in establishing governance and associated capacities, processes and mechanisms, such as the development and implementation of community election systems, adoption of open and transparent governance practices, law-making and development of enforcement authorities.

Results achieved
Expected results Performance indicators Targets Actual results
Enhanced governance capacity of First Nation Governments Percentage of First Nations who have submitted a plan and have received funding for the development or implementation of a Governance Capacity Plana 80% by March 31, 2018
  • 2017–18: 43%b
  • 2016–17: 71%
  • 2015–16: 82%
Percentage of First Nations scoring low risk on the Governance section of the General Assessment 70% by March 31, 2018
  • 2017–18: 76%
  • 2016–17: 70%
  • 2015–16: 76%

a The department uses the United Nations Development Programme's definition of capacity development as the process through which individuals, organizations and societies obtain, strengthen and maintain the capabilities to set and achieve their own development objectives over time.

b In 2017–18, the demand for funding was greater than the resources available with only 137 First Nations receiving funding and only 138 communities having completed Governance Capacity Plans. Additional resources will be provided to First Nations interested in participating in the planning process in 2018-19.

Budgetary financial resources (dollars)
2017–18 Actual spending (authorities used)
174,908,161
Human resources (full-time equivalents)
2017–18 Actual
123

Sub-Program: Indigenous Governance Institutions and Organizations

Description

This sub-program provides funding and supports aggregate program delivery and capacity through Indigenous governance institutions and organizations at the local, regional and national levels, including tribal councils and AFOA Canada (formerly Aboriginal Financial Officers Association of Canada). To provide support to First Nation governments wishing to develop capacity and systems in the areas of taxation and financial management, the First Nations Fiscal Management Act institutions receive administrative, policy and financial support to deliver on their legislative mandates under the Act. Funding, as well as tools, training and advice, are also provided to organizations and institutions to support First Nation government efforts to implement the Family Homes on Reserves and Matrimonial Interests or Rights Act.

Results achieved
Expected results Performance indicators Targets Actual results
Governance institutions and organizations have the capacity to support First Nations Percentage of tribal councils scoring low risk on the General Assessmentab 90% by March 31, 2018
  • 2017–18: 90%
  • 2016–17: 88%
  • a The General Assessment is a tool used by the Department to measure funding agreement management risks.
  • b Indicator created in 2016–17.
Budgetary financial resources (dollars)
2017-18 Actual spending (authorities used)
10,097,368
Human resources (full-time equivalents)
2017-18 Actual
0

Strategic Outcome: The People

Individual, family and community well-being for First Nations and Inuit

Program: Education

Sub-Program: Elementary and Secondary Education

Description

This sub-program supports First Nation decision making by providing funding to eligible on-reserve students with elementary and secondary education services that are comparable to those required in provincial schools. The sub-program provides funding to First Nations, or organizations designated by First Nations, to pay salaries for on-reserve school teachers and other instructional services, reimburse tuition for on-reserve students who attend provincial schools, provide student support services (e.g. transportation), and enhance education services (e.g. curriculum and language development, teacher recruitment and retention, community and parent engagement in education, and Information Communication Technology capacity). Funding also targets a series of specific initiatives that: support students with identified, high-cost special education needs; improve student achievement levels in reading, writing and mathematics; develop school success plans; implement school performance measurement systems to assess, report on, and accelerate student progress; and encourage students to remain in school and graduate. Additionally, this sub-program invests in tripartite partnerships — amongst First Nations, provincial governments and the Government of Canada — to help First Nation students who move between on-reserve and provincial schools to succeed. This sub-program also includes a number of initiatives that support culturally appropriate education activities, including cultural education centres. It also provides support to First Nation and Inuit youth in their efforts to transition from secondary school to either post-secondary education or the labour market.

Results Achieved
Expected results Performance indicators Targets Actual results
First Nation students progress in their elementary and secondary education The percentage of tested students on reserve who meet or exceed standard assessmenta for literacy and numeracy in the province of reference (at the testing interval adopted by that province, referenced by gender and province) Incremental increase year after year See table below.
a Standardized assessment attainment and increases in attainment rates over time are proxy indicators for likelihood of overall progression in studies.
Actual Resultsa
  Literacy Numeracy
2015−16b 2016–17b 2017–18b 2015–16b 2016–17b 2017–18b
Atlantic Male 68% 55% To come in 2019. 46% 52% To come in 2019.
Female 78% 63% 43% 50%
Quebec Male 39% 38% To come in 2019. 33% 35% To come in 2019.
Female 46% 42% 39% 42%
Ontario Male 59% 42% To come in 2019. 49% 30% To come in 2019.
Female 63% 44% 49% 29%
Manitoba Male 20% 20% To come in 2019. 33% 33% To come in 2019.
Female 31% 31% 39% 29%
Alberta Male 29% 25% To come in 2019. 39% 30% To come in 2019.
Female 33% 33% 20% 31%
British Columbia Male 47% 49% To come in 2019. 62% 58% To come in 2019.
Female 89% 49% 62% 57%

Note: Notwithstanding the mixed results noted in the table above, the trend in the overall number of students who met or exceeded the standard assessment increased by 1,735 students for literacy and 861 students for numeracy over the same period.

  • a Reporting on data for this indicator is only required for First Nation Student Success Program recipients. Actual results are for First Nation students on reserve who participated in standardized testing in 2016–17. Note that testing of this nature is no longer performed in Saskatchewan.
  • b Standardized testing results for 2017–18 are expected in 2019.
Budgetary financial resources (dollars)
2017–18 Actual spending (authorities used)
708,245,093
Human resources (full-time equivalents)
2017–18 Actual
98

Sub-Program: Post-Secondary Education

Description

This sub-program helps eligible First Nation and Inuit students access and succeed in post-secondary education. The sub-program provides funding to First Nations, tribal councils or regional First Nation and Inuit organizations to assist eligible students to pay for tuition fees, books, travel, and living expenses (when applicable). Financial support also targets a series of specific initiatives to: enable eligible First Nation and Inuit students to attain the academic level required for entrance to degree and diploma credit programs through entrance preparation programs offered by Canadian post-secondary institutions; and assist post-secondary education institutions to design and deliver university- and college-level courses that are tailored to the needs of First Nation and Inuit students. This sub-program also provides funding to Indspire — a national, registered non-profit organization — to provide post-secondary scholarships, including matching funds raised by Indspire from non-federal sources, and to deliver programs, such as career conferences, for secondary students in order to help First Nation and Inuit students pursue academic or career opportunities.

Results Achieved
Expected results Performance indicators Targets Actual results
First Nation and Inuit post-secondary students who receive funding through the Post-Secondary Student Support Program (PSSSP) progress in their program of study. Percentage of PSSSP funded students who completed their academic year and were funded the next academic yeara Incremental increase year after year See in Chart A below.
Percentage of First Nation and Inuit students, funded through PSSSP, who continue in the program beyond the first year of their program of studyb Incremental increase year after year See Chart B below.
  • a This indicator represents movement of all funded students from any academic year to the next.
  • b This indicator represents movement of funded students from the first to second years of study only, and is also a proxy indicator for retention of students at a critical point of their education.
Chart A: Percentage of PSSSP funded students who completed their academic year and were funded the next academic year
  2015–16 2016–17 2017–18
Overall retention 49.7% To come December 2018 To come December 2019
Return to same institution program and level of study 44.8% To come December 2018 To come December 2019
Returned to a different institution program or level of study within the same region 4.9% To come December 2018 To come December 2019
Chart B: Percentage of First Nation and Inuit students, funded through PSSSP, who continue in the program beyond the first year of their program of study
  Baseline (2012–13) 2015–16 2016–17 2017–18
Overall retention for year one students 25.5% 33.7% To come December 2018 To come December 2019
Second year at same institution, program and level of study 10.4% 30.4% To come December 2018 To come December 2019
Second year at a different institution, program and level of study, within the same region 15.1% 3.3% To come December 2018 To come December 2019
Budgetary financial resources (dollars)
2017–18 Actual spending (authorities used)
111,765,318
Human resources (full-time equivalents)
2017–18 Actual
8

Program: Social Development

Sub-Program: Income Assistance

Description

This sub-program provides funding to First Nations, First Nation organizations and the province of Ontario (under the 1965 agreement) to assist eligible individuals and families living on reserve who are in financial need, through the provision of basic and special needs that are in alignment with the rates and eligibility criteria of reference for provinces or Yukon. The sub-program also provides funding for service delivery and pre-employment services designed to help clients transition to, and remain in, the workforce. The department also contributes to the funding of day care services for First Nation families in Ontario and Alberta.

Results achieved
Expected results Performance indicators Targets Actual results
Eligible men and women in need use income assistance supports and services to help them meet their basic needsa and transition to the workforce Percentage of Income Assistance clients and dependents, aged 16–64, who participate in Active Measuresb Increasing year over year by March 31, 2018
  • 2017–18: To come November 2018
  • 2016–17: 9.4%
  • 2015–16: 7%
Income Assistance Dependency Rate Aligned to off-reserve dependency rate by March 31, 2018
  • 2017–18: To come November 2018
  • 2016–17: 30.5%
  • 2015–16: 29.8%
  • a "Basic needs" are defined as supports provided to eligible clients and dependents for the following categories of support: food; clothing; shelter costs including, rent, fuel/utilities, and other shelter-related costs.
  • b "Active measures" is an approach to the delivery of Income Assistance and relies on two key components: 1) active case-management, which is a collaborative, client driven process for the provision of support services through the effective and efficient use of resources. Case Management supports the client's achievement of safe, realistic and reasonable goals within a complex health, social, and fiscal environment; 2) client's access to services and programs aims reducing obstacles to employment and increasing employability through basic skills training, formal education, skills training, and career counseling.
Budgetary financial resources (dollars)
2017–18 Actual spending (authorities used)
322,459,893
Human resources (full-time equivalents)
2017–18 Actual
23

Sub-Program: Assisted Living

Description

This sub-program provides funding for non-medical, social support services so that seniors, adults with chronic illness, and children and adults with disabilities can maintain functional independence. There are three major components to the sub-program: in-home care; adult foster care; and institutional care (institutional care is provided for eligible individuals in need of personal, non-medical care on a 24-hour basis). These services are available to individuals living on reserve or ordinarily resident on reserve who have been formally assessed by a health care professional (in a manner consistent with provincial or territorial legislation and standards), and identified as requiring services but without the means to obtain such services themselves.

Results achieved
Expected results Performance indicators Targets Actual results
In-home, group-home and institutional care supports are accessible to low-income individuals in need Percentage of clients whose assessed social support needs are met 100% by March 31, 2018
  • 2017–18: To come November 2018
  • 2016–17: 98%
  • 2015–16: 99.7%
Budgetary financial resources (dollars)
2017–18 Actual spending (authorities used)
41,609,715
Human resources (full-time equivalents)
2017–18 Actual
7

Sub-Program: First Nations Child and Family Services

Description

This sub-program provides funding for child and family services supporting the safety and well-being of First Nation children and families who are ordinarily resident on reserve. Culturally appropriate prevention and protection services are delivered by service providers in accordance with provincial or territorial legislation and standards. This sub-program supports: developmental funding for new organizations; maintenance funding for costs associated with maintaining a child in care; operations funding for staffing and administrative costs of an agency; and prevention funding. In 2007, following provincial lead, the First Nations Child and Family Services sub-program started introducing changes focussing on prevention. The goal of the prevention approach is to improve services, family cohesion and life outcomes for First Nation children and families on reserve.

Results achieved
Expected results Performance indicators Targets Actual results
First Nation children in need or at risk have access to and use protection and prevention supports and services Percentage of children not re-entering the child welfare system following a prior placement within the fiscal year (recurrence)a Increasing year over year by March 31, 2018
  • 2017–18: Not availableb
  • 2016–17: Not availableb
  • 2015–16: Not availableb
Percentage of children in care who are placed with a family member (kinship care)c Increasing year over year by March 31, 2018
  • 2017–18: 16.45%d
  • 2016–17: 17.46%e
  • 2015–16: 15.95%
  • a Information regarding a child's admission into care, including the child's admission start date or the child's discharge date, is not captured in the information management system for this sub-program. Two regions (Ontario and British Columbia) receive and track child admission data, and a count based on the child maintenance data for both of these regions has been used to determine the percentage of children not re-entering the child welfare system following a prior placement within the fiscal year. There may be situations where a child does not have any reported placement expenses for a period of time, but is still in care for the fiscal year.
  • b This performance indicator is no longer used. As part of the program reform, the First Nations Child Family Services Program is developing new performance indicators and updating data collection instruments. These indicators will be collected starting April 2019.
  • c Expense-based child maintenance data are received from recipients throughout the fiscal year. The percentage is based on eligible placement expenses based on the last day of the fiscal year. The fiscal years 2013–14 to 2015–16 represented a transition period in the Quebec region, as the unionization of foster families led to changes in how child maintenance data were reported. As a result, there was no clear distinction between a child serviced by foster care and a child serviced by kinship care. Therefore, numbers of kinship placements artificially appeared to go down. These data will be reported accurately for the 2016–17 fiscal year.
  • d Data from the following Provinces/Territory are incomplete: AB, BC, MB, NB, NL, NS, ON, PE, QC, SK, YT. The finalized data is expected January 2019.
  • e Data from the following Provinces/Territory are incomplete: AB, YT. The finalized data is expected August 2018.
Budgetary financial resources (dollars)
2017–18 Actual spending (authorities used)
387,247,558
Human resources (full-time equivalents)
2017–18 Actual
17

Sub-Program: Family Violence Prevention

Description

This sub-program provides funding for family violence protection and prevention services that are responsive to community needs for which there are two components. The first component supports women, children and families living on reserve with family violence shelter services by providing funding to core shelter operations. The second component is to support family violence prevention activities by providing funding to Indigenous communities and organizations. The Family Violence Prevention sub-program also works to address issues related to Indigenous women and girls.

Results Achieved
Expected results Performance indicators Targets Actual results
Men, women or children in need or at risk have access to and use prevention and protection services Number of women and children accessing the department's funded shelters Not applicablea
  • 2017–18: To come December 2018
  • 2016–17: 1655 women, 1419 children
  • 2015–16: 3,365 women, 1,720 childrenb
Percentage of projects directed to community priorities/needsc 95% by March 31, 2018
  • 2017–18: To come December 2018
  • 2016–17: 64%
  • a Setting targets for this indicator is not appropriate as it represents the ability to meet the needs of First Nation women and children for access to shelters.
  • b These figures are based on the 38 out of 41 (93 percent) recipient reports.
  • c Indicator created in 2016–17.
Budgetary financial resources (dollars)
2017–18 Actual spending (authorities used)
18,732,397
Human resources (full-time equivalents)
2017–18 Actual
5

Strategic Outcome: The Land and Economy

Full participation of First Nations, Métis, Non-Status Indians and Inuit individuals and communities in the economy

Program: Infrastructure and Capacity*

Sub-Program: Water and Wastewater

Description

This sub-program provides funding to plan, design, construct, acquire, operate and maintain water and wastewater systems, including water supply, treatment and distribution, and wastewater collection, treatment and disposal. It also provides funding to: coordinate training and capacity building for activities related to water and wastewater facilities; identify on-reserve water and wastewater infrastructure needs; develop water and wastewater infrastructure capital plans; and design and implement management practices for water and wastewater facilities maintenance. The goal is to support First Nations in meeting health and safety standards and provide on-reserve residents with service levels comparable to those off reserve. First Nations identify priorities and needs and present project proposals to the Department. Funding is provided for projects based on a priority assessment.

Results Achieved
Expected results Performance indicators Targets Actual results
First Nations drinking water and wastewater systems meet established standards Percentage of on-reserve department-funded First Nation drinking water systems that have low risk ratings 65% by March 31, 2019
  • 2017–18: 57%
  • 2016–17: 56%
  • 2015–16: 56%
Percentage of on-reserve department-funded First Nation wastewater systems that have low risk ratings 65% by March 31, 2019
  • 2017–18: 46%
  • 2016–17: 43%
  • 2015–16: 45%
Number of long-term drinking water advisories affecting First Nation drinking water systems financially supported by the departmenta 31 by March 31, 2019 2017–18: 69b
  • a Indicator created in 2017–18. The Prime Minister committed to ending all long-term drinking water advisories on public systems on reserve by March 2021. In January 2018, ISC added nearly 250 more drinking water systems to those already eligible for Government of Canada financial support.
  • b As of October 1, 2018, 72 long-term drinking water advisories have been lifted on public systems since November 2015.
Budgetary financial resources (dollars)
2017–18 Actual spending (authorities used)
411,950,016
Human resources (full-time equivalents)
2017–18 Actual
44

Sub-Program: Education Facilities

Description

This sub-program provides funding to: plan, design, construct/acquire, renovate, repair, replace, and operate and maintain band-operated elementary and secondary education facilities (including school buildings, teacherages and student residences) and any related facility services. Provincial school boards are also eligible for funding to plan, design, construct/acquire elementary and secondary education facilities for First Nation students. This sub-program also provides funding to: acquire, replace, and repair furniture, equipment and furnishing for schools, teacherages and student residences; identify education facility needs, and develop education facility plans; and design and implement maintenance management practices.

Results Achieved
Expected results Performance indicators Targets Actual results
First Nation education facilities meet established standards Percentage of First Nation schools with a greater than "fair" condition rating 70% by March 31, 2019
  • 2017–18: 59%
  • 2016–17: 62%
  • 2015–16: 63%
Budgetary financial resources (dollars)
2017–18 Actual spending (authorities used)
208,075,346
Human resources (full-time equivalents)
2017–18 Actual
14

Sub-Program: Housing

Description
This sub-program provides funding for First Nations to: plan and manage housing needs; design, construct and acquire new housing units; as well as renovate existing housing units. Working with First Nations, this sub-program seeks to increase the supply of safe and affordable housing to achieve better housing outcomes for on-reserve residents.
Results Achieved
Expected results Performance indicators Targets Actual results
First Nations housing infrastructure needsa are supported Percentage of First Nation housing that is adequateb as assessed and reported annually by First Nations 75% by March 31, 2019
  • 2017–18: To come March 2019c
  • 2016–17: 73%
  • 2015–16: 74.2%
  • a Housing infrastructure needs are identified by First Nation communities.
  • b Adequate is defined as dwellings that do not require major renovations and possess basic plumbing facilities, hot and cold running water, inside toilets, and installed baths or showers.
  • c Data for year 2017–18 will be reported by end of December 2018.
Budgetary financial resources (dollars)
2017–18 Actual spending (authorities used)
155,168,354
Human resources (full-time equivalents)
2017–18 Actual
23

Sub-Program: Other Community Infrastructure and Activities

Description

This sub-program provides funding to plan, design, construct, acquire, operate and maintain community infrastructure assets and facilities, as well as coordinate training and undertake capacity-building activities in this area. The goal is to support First Nations in better meeting health and safety standards and provide on-reserve residents with similar levels of service to those off reserve. First Nations identify priorities and needs in their First Nation Infrastructure Investment Plans. Funding is provided for projects based on a priority assessment.

Results Achieved
Expected results Performance indicators Targets Actual results
First Nations other infrastructure meet established standards Percentage of bridges with greater than "fair" condition rating 60% by March 31, 2019
  • 2017–18: 51%
  • 2016–17: 54%
  • 2015–16: 54%
Percentage of roads with greater than "fair" condition rating 47% by March 31, 2019
  • 2017–18: 43%
  • 2016–17: 44%
  • 2015–16: 45%
Budgetary financial resources (dollars)
2017–18 Actual spending (authorities used)
340,470,224
Human resources (full-time equivalents)
2017–18 Actual
57

Sub-Program: Emergency Management Assistance

Description

This sub-program provides funding to protect the health and safety of on-reserve First Nations residents as well as their lands and critical infrastructure. The sub-program promotes the four pillars of emergency management — mitigation, preparedness, response, and recovery — by providing funding and overseeing the reimbursement of eligible emergency management costs; providing timely and efficient situational awareness; and developing policy to support emergency management. It further promotes efficiency by accessing existing resources and services of provincial/territorial and First Nation emergency management partners to address on-reserve emergencies as required (with the mandate to reimburse partners for eligible expenses).

Results Achieved
Expected results Performance indicators Targets Actual results
First Nations are supported in their efforts to mitigate and prepare for emergencies Percentage of non-structural mitigation (i.e., flood mapping and risk assessment) and preparedness funding allocated towards on-reserve emergency resiliency and capacity buildinga 100% of the $19.1 million allocated towards on-reserve emergency resiliency and capacity building by March 31, 2018
  • 2017–18: 87%b
  • 2016–17: over 80%
First Nations are supported in their response to and recovery from emergencies Transfer of funds equivalent to eligible costs identified (eligible costs can include but not limited to the evacuation of on-reserve First Nation communities, direct emergency response activities, and other cleaning and rebuilding expenses) 100% by March 31, 2018
  • 2017–18: 100%
  • 2016–17: 100%
  • 2015–16: 100%
  • a Indicator created in 2016–17.
  • b Of the $19.1 million,$16.6 million was spent on emergency resilience and capacity building activities. The remaining $2.5 million was reallocated within the Department towards winter roads in Ontario.
Budgetary financial resources (dollars)
2017–18 Actual spending (authorities used)
89,871,599
Human resources (full-time equivalents)
2017–18 Actual
9

Strategic Outcome: First Nations and Inuit Health

First Nations and Inuit communities and individuals receive health services and benefits that are responsive to their needs so as to improve their health status

Program: First Nations and Inuit Primary Health Care

Sub-Program: First Nations and Inuit Health Promotion and Disease Prevention

Description

The First Nations and Inuit Health Promotion and Disease Prevention program delivers health promotion and disease prevention services to First Nations and Inuit in Canada. The program administers contribution agreements and direct departmental spending for culturally appropriate community based programs, services, initiatives, and strategies. In the delivery of this program, the following three key areas are targeted: healthy child development; mental wellness; and healthy living. The program objective is to address the healthy development of children and families, to improve mental wellness, and to reduce the impacts of chronic disease on First Nations and Inuit individuals, families, and communities.

Results Achieved
Expected results Performance indicators Targets Actual results
First Nations and Inuit communities have capacity to deliver community-based health promotion and disease prevention programs and services. Number of community diabetes prevention workers in First Nations communities who completed training.a 490 by March 31, 2018
  • 2017–18: 503
  • 2016–17: 492
  • 2015–16: 462
Number of program workers in First Nations communities who completed certified/accredited healthy child development training during the reporting year. 395 by March 31, 2018
  • 2017–18: Not availableb
  • 2016–17: Not availableb
  • 2015–16: 383
Percentage of addictions counsellors in treatment centres serving First Nations and Inuit clients who are certified workers.a 80% by March 31, 2018
  • 2017–18: 78%
  • 2016–17: 77%
  • 2015–16: 78%
  • a Actual results represent information from the previous fiscal year.
  • b Data was not available due to methodological issues.
Budgetary financial resources (dollars)
2017–18 Actual spending (authorities used)
164,583,867
Human resources (full-time equivalents)
2017–18 Actual
156

Sub-Sub Program: Healthy Child Development

Description

The Healthy Child Development program administers contribution agreements and direct departmental spending to support culturally appropriate community based programs, services, initiatives, and strategies related to maternal, infant, child, and family health. The range of services includes prevention and health promotion, outreach and home visiting, and early childhood development programming. Targeted areas in the delivery of this program include: prenatal health, nutrition, early literacy and learning, and physical and children's oral health. The program objective is to address the greater risks and lower health outcomes associated with First Nations and Inuit infants, children, and families. This program uses funding from the following transfer payment: First Nations and Inuit Primary Health Care.

Results achieved
Expected results Performance indicators Targets Actual results
Women in First Nations communities have access to breastfeeding and pre/postnatal nutrition services and supports. Number of women in First Nations communities accessing Prenatal and Postnatal Health services and supports including Nutrition. 9,500 by March 31, 2018
  • 2017–18: 9,700
  • 2016–17: 8,226
  • 2015–16: 8,813
Percentage of First Nations communities with maternal and child health programming that provide group breastfeeding support activities. 50% by March 31, 2018
  • 2017–18: 50.5%
  • 2016–17: 51.6%
  • 2015–16: 50%
Percentage of women in First Nations communities accessing maternal and child health program activities who breastfed for 6 months or more. 30% by March 31, 2018
  • 2017–18: 30.7%
  • 2016–17: 29%
  • 2015–16: 29%
Difference in percentage of children aged 0 to 11 who were breastfed longer than six months in First Nations communities with Maternal Child Health (MCH) programs versus those without MCH programs. 8.5% difference by March 31, 2019
  • 2017–18: To come October 2018
  • 2016–17: To come October 2018
First Nations have access to healthy child development programs and services. Number of children in First Nations communities accessing early literacy and learning services and supports. 14,000 by March 31, 2018
  • 2017–18: 19,125
  • 2016–17: 14,427
  • 2015–16: 13,386
Average number of decayed teeth in the 0–7 year population in First Nations communities with access to the Children's Oral Health Initiative (COHI). Primary Teeth 1.55 and Permanent Teeth: 0.12 by March 31, 2018 2017–18:
  • Primary Teeth: 1.63
  • Permanent Teeth: 0.12
2016–17:
  • Primary Teeth: 2.07
  • Permanent Teeth: 0.17a
Percentage of First Nations communities that screen for risk factors for developmental milestones through participation in healthy child development programs and services. 70% by March 31, 2018
  • 2017–18: 70.1%
  • 2016–17: 68.9%
  • 2015–16: 69%
a Indicator created in 2016–17.
Budgetary financial resources (dollars)
2017–18 Actual spending (authorities used)
29,380,055
Human resources (full-time equivalents)
2017–18 Actual
40

Sub-Sub Program: Mental Wellness

Description

The Mental Wellness program administers contribution agreements and direct departmental spending that supports culturally appropriate community based programs, services, initiatives and strategies related to the mental wellness of First Nations and Inuit. The range of services includes prevention, early intervention, treatment, and aftercare. Key services supporting program delivery include: problematic substance use prevention and treatment (part of Indigenous Services Canada support initiatives), mental health promotion, suicide prevention, and health supports for participants of the Indian Residential Schools Settlement Agreement. The program objective is to address the greater risks and lower health outcomes associated with the mental wellness of First Nations and Inuit individuals, families, and communities. This program uses funding from the following transfer payment: First Nations and Inuit Primary Health Care.

Results achieved
Expected results Performance indicators Targets Actual results
First Nations and Inuit have access to mental wellness programs and services. Percentage of First Nations communities offering training on signs and symptoms and responding to suicidal behaviours.a 75%a by March 31, 2018
  • 2017–18: 79%
  • 2016–17: 75%
Percentage of First Nations communities that report service linkages with external service providers in delivering Mental Wellness promotion 93% by March 31, 2018
  • 2017–18: 90.4%
  • 2016–17: 87.6%
  • 2015–16: 92%
First Nations and Inuit clients who have received addictions treatment abstain from or decrease drug and alcohol use up to six months after completing treatment. Percentage of First Nations clients admitted to a treatment centre who stop using at least one substance up to six months after completing treatment. 40% by March 31, 2018
  • 2017–18: Not availableb
  • 2016–17: Not availableb
  • 2015–16: 60%
Percentage of First Nations clients admitted to a treatment centre who reduce using at least one substance up to six months after completing treatment. 60% by March 31, 2018
  • 2017–18: Not availableb
  • 2016–17: Not availableb
  • 2015–16: 94%
  • a Indicator created in 2016–17.
  • b Actual results in 2015-16 were derived from a time-limited treatment centre outcome study. While there had been plans to continue to expand the study to a broader reporting sample, data availability was limited. For this reason, the Department is unable to provide actual results for this indicator for 2016-17 and 2017-18. Moving forward, the Department is reviewing its performance indicators, data sources and methodology to ensure the program is meeting its expected results.
Budgetary financial resources (dollars)
2017–18 Actual spending (authorities used)
108,944,279
Human resources (full-time equivalents)
2017–18 Actual
63

Sub-Sub Program: Healthy Living

Description

The Healthy Living program administers contribution agreements and direct departmental spending that supports culturally appropriate community based programs, services, initiatives, and strategies related to chronic disease and injuries among First Nations and Inuit. This program aims to promote healthy behaviours and supportive environments in the areas of healthy eating, physical activity, food security, chronic disease prevention, management and screening, and injury prevention policy. Key activities supporting program delivery include: chronic disease prevention and management, injury prevention, the Nutrition North Canada – Nutrition Education Initiative, and the First Nations and Inuit component of the Federal Tobacco Control Strategy. The program objective is to address the greater risks and lower health outcomes associated with chronic diseases and injuries among First Nations and Inuit individuals, families, and communities. This program uses funding from the following transfer payment: First Nations and Inuit Primary Health Care.

Results achieved
Expected results Performance indicators Targets Actual results
First Nations and Inuit have access to healthy living programs and service. Percentage increase in the value of the Aboriginal Financial Institutions network's gross loan portfolio 90% by March 31, 2018
  • 2017–18: 94.5%
  • 2016–17: 92.8%
  • 2015–16: 92%
Percentage of First Nations communities that deliver physical activities. 87% by March 31, 2018
  • 2017–18: 91.3%
  • 2016–17: 88.4%
  • 2015–16: 87.6%
Percentage of First Nations and Inuit communities that deliver healthy eating activities under the Aboriginal Diabetes Initiative. 88% by March 31, 2018
  • 2017–18: 92.4%
  • 2016–17: 90.6%
  • 2015–16: 81.4%
First Nations are engaged in healthy behaviours. Percentage of First Nations adults who reported that they eat fruit or vegetables at least once a day.a 57% for fruits and 64% for vegetables by March 31, 2018
  • 2017–18: To come September 2018
  • 2016–17: 56.6% fruits and 62.9% vegetables
Percentage of First Nations adults who reported being "moderately active" or "active".a 55% by March 31, 2018
  • 2017–18: To come September 2018
  • 2016–17: 53.5%b
  • a Indicator created in 2016–17.
  • b The data source for this indicator, the First Nations Regional Health Survey, is undertaken every five years.
Budgetary financial resources (dollars)
2017–18 Actual spending (authorities used)
26,259,533
Human resources (full-time equivalents)
2017–18 Actual
53

Sub-Program: First Nations and Inuit Public Health Protection

Description

The First Nations and Inuit Public Health Protection program delivers public health protection services to First Nations and Inuit in Canada. In the delivery of this program, the key areas of focus are communicable disease control and management, and environmental public health. The First Nations and Inuit Public Health Protection program administers contribution agreements and direct departmental spending to support initiatives related to communicable disease control and environmental public health service delivery including public health surveillance, research, and risk analysis. Communicable disease control and environmental public health services are targeted to on reserve First Nations, with some support provided in specific instances, (e.g., to address tuberculosis), in Inuit communities south of the 60th parallel. Environmental public health research, surveillance, and risk analysis are directed to on reserve First Nations, and in some cases, (e.g., climate change and health adaptation, and biomonitoring), also to Inuit and First Nations living north of the 60th parallel. Surveillance data underpins these public health activities and all are conducted with the understanding that social determinants play a crucial role. To mitigate impacts from factors beyond the public health system, the program works with First Nations, Inuit, and other organizations. The program objective is to address human health risks for First Nations and Inuit communities associated with communicable diseases and exposure to hazards within the natural and built environments by increasing community capacity to respond to these risks.

Results achieved
Expected results Performance indicators Targets Actual results
First Nations have community capacity to respond to health emergencies. Percentage of First Nations communities with Pandemic Plans integrated into all-hazards emergency management plans. 70% by March 31, 2018
  • 2017–18: 61.5%a
  • 2016–17: 65%
  • 2015–16: 70%
Percentage of First Nations communities that have tested their Pandemic plans within the last five years.b 20% by March 31, 2018
  • 2017–18: 13.3%
  • 2016–17: 17.9%
  • a The figure may be due to methodological limitations. In addition, inadequate investment in this area had an impact on the ability to meet the target.
  • b Indicator created in 2016–17.
Budgetary financial resources (dollars)
2017–18 Actual spending (authorities used)
39,389,159
Human resources (full-time equivalents)
2017–18 Actual
151

Sub-Sub Program: Communicable Disease Control and Management

Description

The Communicable Disease Control and Management program administers contribution agreements and direct departmental spending to support initiatives related to vaccine preventable diseases, blood borne diseases and sexually transmitted infections, respiratory infections, and communicable disease emergencies. In collaboration with other jurisdictions communicable disease control and management activities are targeted to on reserve First Nations, with support provided to specific instances, (such as to address tuberculosis), in Inuit communities south of the 60th parallel. Communicable Disease Control and Management activities are founded on public health surveillance and evidence based approaches and reflective of the fact that all provincial and territorial governments have public health legislation. Key activities supporting program delivery include: prevention, treatment and control of cases and outbreaks of communicable diseases; and, public education and awareness to encourage healthy practices. A number of these activities are closely linked with those undertaken in the Environmental Health program (3.1.2.2), as they relate to waterborne, foodborne and zoonotic infectious diseases. The program objective is to reduce the incidence, spread, and human health effects of communicable diseases for First Nations and Inuit communities. This program uses funding from the following transfer payment: First Nations and Inuit Primary Health Care.

Results achieved
Expected results Performance indicators Targets Actual results
Communicable diseases among First Nations on-reserve are prevented, mitigated and/or treated. Number of First Nations children on-reserve diagnosed with measles or rubella acquired in Canada.a 0 by March 31, 2018
  • 2017–18: 0b
  • 2016–17: 0
Percentage of cases of treatment success (cure or completion) in active tuberculosis (TB) cases among First Nations on-reserve.a 90% by March 31, 2018
  • 2017–18: 82.5%
  • 2016–17: 90
First Nations children on-reserve are vaccinated against mumps, measles and rubella (MMR). Percentage of First Nations children on-reserve who have received the MMR vaccine. 85% by March 31, 2018
  • 2017–18: 80.40%
  • 2016–17: 81.5%
  • 2015–16: N/A
Percentage of First Nations communities conducting immunization education and awareness activities. 65% by March 31, 2018
  • 2017–18: 62.9%
  • 2016–17: 59.3%
  • 2015–16: 59%c
  • a Indicator created in 2016–17.
  • b The target is 0 because it is an objective of the program to have no children diagnosed with measles or rubella acquired in Canada.
  • c A new data source/ methodology was used for 2015–16.
Budgetary financial resources (dollars)
2017–18 Actual spending (authorities used)
23,925,969
Human resources (full-time equivalents)
2017–18 Actual
78

Sub-Sub Program: Environmental Public Health

Description

The Environmental Public Health program administers contribution agreements and direct departmental spending for environmental public health service delivery. Environmental public health services are directed to First Nations communities south of the 60th parallel and address areas such as: drinking water; wastewater; solid waste disposal; food safety; health and housing; facilities inspections; environmental public health aspects of emergency preparedness response; and, communicable disease control. Environmental public health surveillance and risk analysis programming is directed to First Nations communities south of the 60th parallel, and in some cases, also to Inuit and First Nations north of the 60th parallel. It includes community based and participatory research on trends and impacts of environmental factors such as chemical contaminants and climate change on the determinants of health (e.g., biophysical, social, cultural, and spiritual). Key activities supporting program delivery include: public health; surveillance, monitoring and assessments; public education; training; and, community capacity building. The program objective is to identify, address, and/or prevent human health risks to First Nations and Inuit communities associated with exposure to hazards within the natural and built environments. This program uses funding from the following transfer payment: First Nations and Inuit Primary Health Care.

Results achieved
Expected results Performance indicators Targets Actual results
Information about environmental health Information about environmental health hazards in First Nations communities is available to decision-makers (at Indigenous Services Canada and local First Nations and Inuit communities). Total number of public health inspections conducted in food facilities on reserve by Environmental Health Officers (EHO).a 1,482 by March 31, 2018
  • 2017–18: 2127
  • 2016–17: 2031
Number of homes in First Nations communities inspected by EHOs.a 1,359 by March 31, 2018
  • 2017–18: 1157
  • 2016–17: 1438
Percentage of inspected homes in First Nations communities that were found to have mould.a 45% by March 31, 2018
  • 2017–18: 47.60%
  • 2016–17: 49.30%
Environmental health risks relating to water quality are decreased in First Nations and Inuit communities. Average percentage rate of public water systems monitoring in First Nations communities as compared to the frequency recommended by the national guidelines for bacteriological parameters. 80% by March 31, 2018
  • 2017–18: 80%
  • 2016–17: 80%
  • 2015–16: 80%
a Indicator created in 2016–17.
Budgetary financial resources (dollars)
2017–18 Actual spending (authorities used)
15,463,190
Human resources (full-time equivalents)
2017–18 Actual
73

Sub-Program: First Nations and Inuit Primary Care

Description

The First Nations and Inuit Primary Care program administers contribution agreements and direct departmental spending. These funds are used to support the staffing and operation of nursing stations on reserve, dental therapy services and home and community care programs in First Nation and Inuit communities, and on reserve hospitals in Manitoba, where services are not provided by provincial/territorial health systems. Care is delivered by a collaborative health care team, predominantly nurse led, providing integrated and accessible health care services that include: assessment; diagnostic; curative; case management; rehabilitative; supportive; respite; and, palliative/end of life care. Key activities supporting program delivery include Clinical and Client Care in addition to Home and Community Care. The program objective is to provide primary care services to First Nations and Inuit communities.

Results achieved
Expected results Performance indicators Targets Actual results
First Nations communities have access to collaborative service delivery arrangements with external primary care service providers. Percentage of First Nations communities with collaborative service delivery arrangements with external primary care service providers. 80% by March 31, 2018
  • 2017–18: 67.25%a
  • 2016–17: 75%
  • 2015–16: 69%
a The result may have been impacted by the data collection tool response rate.
Budgetary financial resources (dollars)
2017–18 Actual spending (authorities used)
180,052,161
Human resources (full-time equivalents)
2017–18 Actual
302

Sub-Sub Program: Clinical and Client Care

Description

The Clinical and Client Care program is delivered by a collaborative health care team, predominantly nurse led, providing integrated and accessible health and oral health care services that include assessment, diagnostic, curative, and rehabilitative services for urgent and non-urgent care. Key services supporting program delivery include: triage, emergency resuscitation and stabilization, emergency ambulatory care, and outpatient non urgent services; coordinated and integrated care and referral to appropriate provincial secondary and tertiary levels of care outside the community; and, in some communities, physician visits and hospital in patient, ambulatory, and emergency services. The program objective is to provide clinical and client care services to First Nations individuals, families, and communities. This program uses funding from the following transfer payment: First Nations and Inuit Primary Health Care.

Results Achieved
Expected results Performance indicators Targets Actual results
First Nations populations have access to Clinical and Client Care services. Percentage of the eligible on-reserve population accessing Clinical and Client Care services in remote and isolated First Nations facilities (Nursing Stations and Health Centers with Treatment). 50% by March 31, 2018
  • 2017–18: Not availableb
  • 2016–17: Not availableb
  • 2015–16: Not availableb
Percentage of urgent Clinical and Client Care visits provided in remote and isolated facilities.a 10% by March 31, 2018
  • 2017–18: 14%c
  • 2016–17: 23%
Indigenous Services Canada nurses providing Clinical and Client Care services have completed mandatory training. Percentage of Indigenous Services Canada nurses who have completed FNIHB's 5 mandatory training courses.a 100% by March 31, 2018
  • 2017–18: 80%
  • 2016–17: 60%
  • a Indicator created in 2016–17.
  • b Actual results between 2015-16 and 2017-18 are not available due to reliability issues with the data that was collected. Moving forward, the Department is reviewing its performance indicators, data sources and methodology to ensure the program is meeting its expected results.
  • c While the target of 10% was not reached, there has been significant improvement in the number of urgent visits as a % of total CCC visits in FNIHB nursing stations. This indicator is driven by demand and can vary each year.
Budgetary financial resources (dollars)
2017–18 Actual spending (authorities used)
85,283,296
Human resources (full-time equivalents)
2017–18 Actual
253

Sub-Sub Program: Home and Community Care

Description

The Home and Community Care program administers contribution agreements with First Nation and Inuit communities and territorial governments to enable First Nations and Inuit individuals with disabilities, chronic or acute illnesses, and the elderly to receive the care they need in their homes and communities. Care is delivered primarily by home care registered nurses and trained certified personal care workers. In the delivery of this program First Nations and Inuit Health Branch provides funding through contribution agreements and direct departmental spending for a continuum of basic essential services such as: client assessment and case management; home care nursing, personal care and home support as well as in home respite; and, linkages and referral, as needed, to other health and social services. Based on community needs and priorities, existing infrastructure, and availability of resources, the Home and Community Care program may be expanded to include supportive services. These services may include: rehabilitation and other therapies; adult day programs; meal programs; in home mental health; in home palliative care; and, specialized health promotion, wellness, and fitness services. The program objective is to provide home and community care services to First Nations and Inuit individuals, families, and communities. This program uses funding from the following transfer payment: First Nations and Inuit Primary Health Care.

Results achieved
Expected results Performance indicators Targets Actual results
First Nations and Inuit populations have access to Home and Community Care services. Home and community care utilisation rate per 1,000 on reserve population.a 72 by March 31, 2018
  • 2017–18: 64.94
  • 2016–17: 69
  • 2015–16: 69
Percentage First Nations clients receiving home care where diabetes is the primary reason for care.b 21% by March 31, 2018
  • 2017–18: 20.67%
  • 2016–17: 22%
Percentage First Nations clients receiving long-term supportive care.b 36.95% by March 31, 2018
  • 2017–18: 34.41%
  • 2016–17: 34%
  • a This indicator is driven by demand and can vary each year.
  • b Indicator created in 2016–17.
Budgetary financial resources (dollars)
2017–18 Actual spending (authorities used)
35,950,387
Human resources (full-time equivalents)
2017–18 Actual
37

Sub-Sub Program: Jordan's Principle – A Child First Initiative

Description

Jordan's Principle applies to all First Nations children and all jurisdictional disputes, including those between federal government departments. The Child First Initiative is one of a series of proactive measures under Jordan's Principle to address the needs of the most vulnerable children. The Jordan's Principle—A Child First Initiative (JP – CFI) administers contribution agreements and direct departmental spending to help ensure that First Nations children have access to the health and social services available to children elsewhere in their province/territory. For some of these children, service delivery problems may arise because of the involvement of both federal and provincial/territorial service providers, resource limitations and geographic location or limitation of existing programs. The objective is to improve service coordination and ensure service access resolution so that children's needs are assessed and responded to quickly. This program uses funding from the following transfer payment: First Nations and Inuit Primary Health Care.

Results achieved
Expected results Performance indicators Targets Actual results
First Nations children, receive health or social supports The number of First Nations children requesting services through the JP - CFI who receive services consistent with the provincial/territorial normative standard of carea
  • TBD (A target will be set once a baseline is established after the first year results are gathered).
  • To be achieved by March 31, 2018
2017–18: Not availableb
The number and percentage of First Nations parents and guardians requesting services for their children through the JP - CFI reporting on follow-up that they have access to a coordinated system of supports and servicesa
  • TBD (A target will be set once a baseline is established after the first year results are gathered).
  • To be achieved by March 31, 2018
2017–18: Not availableb
The number of First Nations children requesting services through the JP - CFI who have accessed specific services by type of service (such as respite care, home and community care, speech therapy, occupational therapy, physical therapy).a
  • TBD (A target will be set once a baseline is established after the first year results are gathered).
  • To be achieved by March 31, 2018
2017–18: Not availableb
  • a Indicator created in 2017–18.
  • b Due to a recent Canadian Human Rights Tribunal ruling, this indicator is no longer valid.
Results achieved
Expected results Performance indicators Targets Actual results
First Nations and Inuit populations have access to Home and Community Care services. Home and community care utilisation rate per 1,000 on reserve population.a 72 by March 31, 2018
  • 2017–18: 64.94
  • 2016–17: 69
  • 2015–16: 69
Percentage First Nations clients receiving home care where diabetes is the primary reason for care.b 21% by March 31, 2018
  • 2017–18: 20.67%
  • 2016–17: 22%
Percentage First Nations clients receiving long-term supportive care.b 36.95% by March 31, 2018
  • 2017–18: 34.41%
  • 2016–17: 34%
  • a This indicator is driven by demand and can vary each year.
  • b Indicator created in 2016–17.
Budgetary financial resources (dollars)
2017–18 Actual spending (authorities used)
58,818,478
Human resources (full-time equivalents)
2017–18 Actual
12

Program: Health Infrastructure Support for First Nations and Inuit

Sub-Program: First Nations and Inuit Health System Capacity

Description

The First Nations and Inuit Health System Capacity program administers contribution agreements and direct departmental spending focusing on the overall management and implementation of health programs and services. This program supports the promotion of First Nations and Inuit participation in: health careers including education bursaries and scholarships; the development of, and access to health research; information and knowledge to inform all aspects of health programs and services; and, the construction and maintenance of health facilities. This program also supports efforts to develop new health governance structures with increased First Nations participation. Program engagement includes a diverse group of partners, stakeholders, and clients including: First Nations and Inuit communities, district and tribal councils; national Indigenous organizations and non-governmental organizations; health organizations; provincial and regional health departments and authorities; post-secondary educational institutions and associations; and, health professionals and program administrators. The program objective is to improve the delivery of health programs and services to First Nations and Inuit by enhancing First Nations and Inuit capacity to plan and manage their programs and infrastructure.

Results achieved
Expected results Performance indicators Targets Actual results
First Nations and Inuit have the capacity to enter into and manage funding arrangement. Percentage of First Nations and Inuit funding recipients scoring "Low Risk" on the General Assessment Tool.a 75% by March 31, 2018
  • 2017–18: Not availableb
  • 2016–17: 65%
Percentage of First Nations and Inuit funding recipients without financial intervention as defined by the Department's Default Prevention and Management Policy.a 90% by March 31, 2018
  • 2017–18: 94.5%
  • 2016–17: 98%
First Nations have the capacity to manage their infrastructure Number of recipients who have signed contribution agreements that have developed plans for managing the operations and maintenance of their health infrastructure. 146 by March 31, 2018
  • 2017–18: Not availablec
  • 2016–17: N/A
  • 2015–16: 126
  • a Indicator created in 2016–17.
  • b This indicator is under review as the current data collection methodology does not provide a comprehensive risk rating for the Program Management component of the General Assessment Tool.
  • c Data for this indicator are not available.
Budgetary financial resources (dollars)
2017–18 Actual spending (authorities used)
117,995,362
Human resources (full-time equivalents)
2017–18 Actual
43

Sub-Sub Program: Health Planning and Quality Management

Description

The Health Planning and Quality Management program administers contribution agreements and direct departmental spending to support capacity development for First Nations and Inuit communities. Key services supporting program delivery include: the development and delivery of health programs and services through program planning and management; ongoing health system improvement via accreditation; the evaluation of health programs; and, support for community development activities. The program objective is to increase the capacity of First Nations and Inuit to design, manage, evaluate, and deliver health programs and services. This program uses funding from the following transfer payment: First Nations and Inuit Health Infrastructure Support.

Results achieved
Expected results Performance indicators Targets Actual results
First Nations have the capacity to plan, manage and deliver quality health services. Percentage of Nursing Stations and Health Centres that are accredited.a 24% by March 31, 2018
  • 2017–18: 18.3%
  • 2016–17: 18%
First Nations and Inuit funding recipients have a "Low Risk" score on the Department's Program Management component of the General Assessment Tool. Percentage of First Nations and Inuit funding recipients scoring "Low Risk" on the Department's Program Management component of the General Assessment Tool.a 77% by March 31, 2018
  • 2017–18: Not availableb
  • 2016–17: Not availableb
  • a Indicator created in 2016–17.
  • b This indicator is under review as the current data collection methodology does not provide a comprehensive risk rating for the Program Management component of the General Assessment Tool.
Budgetary financial resources (dollars)
2017–18 Actual spending (authorities used)
36,488,546
Human resources (full-time equivalents)
2017–18 Actual
23

Sub-Sub Program: Health Human Resources

Description

The Health Human Resources program administers contribution agreements and direct departmental spending to promote and support competent health services at the community level by increasing the number of First Nations and Inuit individuals entering into and working in health careers and ensuring that community based workers have skills and certification comparable to workers in the provincial/territorial health care system. This program engages many stakeholders, including: federal, provincial and territorial governments and health professional organizations; national Indigenous organizations; non-governmental organizations and associations; and, educational institutions. Key activities supporting program delivery include: health education bursaries and scholarships; health career promotion activities; internship and summer student work opportunities; knowledge translation activities; training for community based health care workers and health managers; and, development and implementation of health human resources planning for Indigenous, federal, provincial, territorial, health professional associations, educational institutions, and other stakeholders. The program objective is to increase the number of qualified First Nations and Inuit individuals working in health care delivery. This program uses funding from the following transfer payment: First Nations and Inuit Health Infrastructure Support.

Results achieved
Expected results Performance indicators Targets Actual results
Indigenous people participate in post-secondary education leading to health careers. Number of bursaries and scholarships provided to Indigenous people per year in a field of study leading to a career in a health-related discipline. 425 by March 31, 2018
  • 2017–18: 901
  • 2016–17: 709
  • 2015–16: 764
Number of Indigenous people supported by bursaries and scholarships in health careers who have graduated.a
  • TBD following receipt of Indspire's June 2017 report.
  • To be achieved by March 31, 2018
  • 2017–18: To come January 2019
  • 2016–17: 99
a Indicator created in 2016–17.
Budgetary financial resources (dollars)
2017–18 Actual spending (authorities used)
963,232
Human resources (full-time equivalents)
2017–18 Actual
4

Sub-Sub Program: Health Facilities

Description

The Health Facilities program administers contribution agreements and direct departmental spending that provide communities and/or health care providers with the facilities required to safely and efficiently deliver health programs and services. Direct departmental spending addresses the working conditions of Indigenous Services Canada staff engaged in the direct delivery of health programs and services to First Nations. Key activities supporting program delivery include: investment in infrastructure that can include the construction, acquisition, leasing, operation, maintenance, expansion and/or renovation of health facilities and security services; preventative and corrective measures relating to infrastructure; and, improving the working conditions for Indigenous Services Canada staff so as to maintain or restore compliance with building codes, environmental legislation, and occupational health and safety standards. The program objective is to enhance the capacity of First Nations recipients in capital planning and management, in order to support safe health facilities. This program uses funding from the following transfer payment: First Nations and Inuit Health Infrastructure Support.

Results achieved
Expected results Performance indicators Targets Actual results
Health care services delivered in First Nations communities are provided in a safe environment. Percentage of "high priority" recommendations stemming from Integrated Facility Audits are addressed on schedule. 79% by March 31, 2018
  • 2017–18: 67.97%
  • 2016–17: Not availablea
  • 2015–16: 74%
Percentage of health facilities subject to an Integrated Facility Audit that do not have critical property issues. 60% by March 31, 2018
  • 2017–18: 68.24%
  • 2016–17: Not availablea
  • 2015–16: 18%
Percentage of nursing stations on reserve inspected within three years.b 100% by March 31, 2019
  • 2017–18: 55%
  • 2016–17: Not availablea
  • a The Department implemented a new inspection regime for First Nations health facilities in fiscal year 2016–17 that is based on a three-year inspection cycle. The Department started reporting on the data in 2017–18 at year two of the inspection cycle.
  • b Indicator created in 2016–17.
Budgetary financial resources (dollars)
2017–18 Actual spending (authorities used)
80,543,584
Human resources (full-time equivalents)
2017–18 Actual
16

Sub-Sub Program: First Nations and Inuit Health Systems Transformation

Description

The First Nations and Inuit Health System Transformation program integrates, coordinates, and develops innovative publicly funded health systems serving First Nations and Inuit individuals, families, and communities through the administration of contribution agreements and direct departmental spending. This program includes the development of innovative approaches to primary health care, sustainable investment in appropriate technologies that enhance health service delivery, and support for the development of new governance structures and initiatives to increase First Nations and Inuit participation in, and control over, the design and delivery of health programs and services in their communities. Through this program, Indigenous Services Canada engages and works with a diverse group of partners, stakeholders, and clients including: First Nations and Inuit communities, tribal councils, Indigenous organizations, provincial and regional health departments and authorities, post-secondary educational institutions and associations, health professionals and program administrators. The program objective is to support integration and/or innovation of First Nations and Inuit health systems, which will result in increased access to care for First Nations and Inuit individuals, families and communities.

Results Achieved
Expected results Performance indicators Targets Actual results
Key stakeholders are engaged in the integration of health services for First Nations and Inuit. Percentage of partnerships within Health Services Integration Fund projects with an assessment of better than expected.a
  • 15% by March 31, 2018
  • (Baseline of 12%)
  • 2017–18: 29%
  • 2016–17: 18.5%
a Indicator created in 2016-17
Budgetary financial resources (dollars)
2017–18 Actual spending (authorities used)
17,419,786
Human resources (full-time equivalents)
2017–18 Actual
31

Sub-Sub Program: Health Systems Integration

Description

The Health Systems Integration program administers contribution agreements and direct departmental spending to better integrate health programs and services funded by the federal government with those funded by provincial/territorial governments. This program supports the efforts of partners in health services, including: First Nations and Inuit, tribal councils, regional/district health authorities, regions, national Indigenous organizations, and provincial/territorial organizations to integrate health systems, services, and programs so they are more coordinated and better suited to the needs of First Nations and Inuit. This program also promotes and encourages emerging tripartite agreements. Two key activities supporting program delivery include: development of multi-party structures to jointly identify integration priorities; and, implementation of multi-year, large scale health service integration projects consistent with agreed upon priorities (i.e., a province wide public health framework or integrated mental health services planning and delivery on a regional scale). The program objective is a more integrated health system for First Nations and Inuit individuals, families and communities that results in increased access to care and improved health outcomes. This program uses funding from the following transfer payment: First Nations and Inuit Health Infrastructure Support.

Results achieved
Expected results Performance indicators Targets Actual results
Partners within multi-jurisdictional health services integration projects are collaborating. Percentage of partnerships within Health Services Integration Fund projects with an assessment of proceeding as planned.a 70% by March 31, 2018
  • 2017–18: 79%
  • 2016–17: 74.8%
a Indicator created in 2016-17.
Budgetary financial resources (dollars)
2017–18 Actual spending (authorities used)
9,308,921
Human resources (full-time equivalents)
2017–18 Actual
9

Sub-Sub Program: e-Health Infostructure

Description

The eHealth Infostructure program administers contribution agreements and direct departmental spending to support and sustain the use and adoption of appropriate health technologies that enable front line care providers to better deliver health services in First Nations and Inuit communities through eHealth partnerships, technologies, tools, and services. Direct departmental spending also supports national projects that examine innovative information systems and communications technologies and that have potential national implications. Key activities supporting program delivery include: public health surveillance; health services delivery (primary and community care included); health reporting, planning and decision making; and, integration/compatibility with other health service delivery partners. The program objective is to improve the efficiency of health care delivery to First Nations and Inuit individuals, families, and communities through the use of eHealth technologies for the purpose of defining, collecting, communicating, managing, disseminating, and using data. This program uses funding from the following transfer payment: First Nations and Inuit Health Infrastructure Support.

Results Achieved
Expected results Performance indicators Targets Actual results
First Nations communities have access to e-Health Infostructure. Number of telehealth sites implemented in First Nations communities. 247 by March 31, 2018
  • 2017–18: To come September 2018
  • 2016–17: 252
  • 2015–16: 248
Number of clinical telehealth sessions in First Nations communities.a 8,160 by March 31, 2018
  • 2017–18: To come September 2018
  • 2016–17: 10,501
Number of First Nations communities where an electronic medical record has been deployed for nurses providing primary care services.a 4 by March 31, 2018
  • 2017–18: To come September 2018
  • 2016–17: 6
First Nations and Inuit have access to provincial/ territorial health information systems. Number of First Nations communities using Panorama or an equivalent provincial integrated public health information system. 43 by March 31, 2018
  • 2017–18: To come September 2018
  • 2016–17: 84
  • 2015–16: 20
Number of collaborative Panorama plans, agreements and/or activities.a 20 by March 31, 2018
  • 2017–18: Not availableb
  • 2016–17: Not availableb
  • a Indicator created in 2016–17.
  • b Data for this indicator are not available. This indicator has been retired in Indigenous Services Canada's performance reporting.
Budgetary financial resources (dollars)
2017–18 Actual spending (authorities used)
8,110,865
Human resources (full-time equivalents)
2017–18 Actual
22

Sub-Program: Tripartite Health Governance

Description

FNIHB's longer term policy approach aims to achieve closer integration of federal and provincial health programming provided to First Nations, as well as to improve access to health programming, reduce instances of service overlap and duplication, and increase efficiency where possible. The British Columbia (BC) Tripartite Initiative consists of an arrangement among the Government of Canada, the Government of BC, and BC First Nations. Since 2006, the parties have negotiated and implemented a series of tripartite agreements to facilitate the implementation of health projects, as well as the development of a new First Nations health governance structure. In 2011, the federal and provincial Ministers of Health and BC First Nations signed the legally binding BC Tripartite Framework Agreement on First Nation Health Governance. This BC Tripartite Framework Agreement commits to the creation of a new province wide First Nations Health Authority (FNHA) to assume the responsibility for design, management, and delivery/funding of First Nations health programming in BC. The FNHA will be controlled by First Nations and will work with the province to coordinate health programming. It may design or redesign health programs according to its health plans. Indigenous Services Canada will remain a funder and governance partner but will no longer have any role in program design/delivery. Funding under this program is limited to the FNHA for the implementation of the BC Tripartite Framework Agreement. The program objective is to enable the FNHA to develop and deliver quality health services that feature closer collaboration and integration with provincial health services. This program uses funding from the following transfer payment: First Nations and Inuit Health Infrastructure Support.

Results achieved
Expected results Performance indicators Targets Actual results
Tripartite governance partners have reciprocal accountability as stated in section 2.2 of the BC Tripartite Framework Agreement on FN Health Governance Percentage of planned partnership and engagement activities that require FNIHB/ Indigenous Services Canada participation that have been implemented. 100% by March 31, 2018
  • 2017–18: 100%
  • 2016–17: 100%
  • 2015–16: 100%
Budgetary financial resources (dollars)
2017–18 Actual spending (authorities used)
116,729,933
Human resources (full-time equivalents)
2017–18 Actual
0
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