2021-22 Departmental Plan

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Table of contents

From the Minister

At the core of our commitment at Indigenous Services Canada, is working in partnership with First Nations, Inuit and Métis to ensure that Indigenous individuals, families and communities have access to high quality, timely, culturally-safe services and infrastructure. Schools, health care facilities, housing, safety and security, and good public work services are essential elements that allow any community to thrive. This is especially so for Indigenous communities that have been more dramatically impacted by the COVID-19 pandemic than most other communities in Canada.

This only underscores the disparities and vulnerabilities many Indigenous Peoples of Canada live with to this day – and highlights the work ahead of us to make this country more inclusive and more just. One thing that has been reinforced over the past several months is this: when local Indigenous leadership is provided with the necessary resources, they are the most successful in responding to a crisis with immediate, innovative and proactive measures to ensure the safety of their members. That is the driving force behind the different support we have made available during the pandemic, including the Indigenous Community Support Fund, so that funding could be directed to where it is most needed. The Fund has played a key role in helping First Nations communities address and implement their pandemic plans by providing funding to promote food security, improve mental health support services, and secure emergency supplies.

An efficient and effective COVID-19 vaccine roll-out requires co-planning and is dependent on full collaboration amongst partners and provinces and territories. To support this, Indigenous Services Canada will continue to engage Indigenous partners, provincial and territorial representatives, and the Public Health Agency of Canada via the COVID-19 Vaccine Working Group. The engagements and continued collaboration through this working group will ensure an integrated and coordinated approach to support the administration and planning process of COVID-19 vaccine for Indigenous People regardless of where they live in Canada.

We know we can count on the tremendous leadership exercised by Indigenous leaders to support vaccination efforts. Respecting nation-to-nation, Inuit-to-Crown, and government-to-government relationships, we will continue to engage with national and regional Indigenous Organizations on the vaccine rollout among the Indigenous Peoples. Finally, we will continue to advocate that Indigenous Peoples be prioritized during the vaccine rollout.

We remain committed to advancing lasting relationships with Indigenous Peoples, closing socio-economic gaps, supporting the right to self-determination and promoting greater prosperity for today and for future generations. This Departmental Plan outlines the specific initiatives that we are carrying out in 2021–22 to support these goals. It also provides important insight into the principles and priorities underlying our actions.

Respect for the diversity of Indigenous cultures across Canada, as well as open and honest partnerships, are two core principles that guides all the work we do.

These principles are the foundation of our mandate. For example, we are committed to improving access to high-quality and culturally relevant healthcare services in order to meet the needs of First Nation, Inuit and Métis everywhere in the country. Central to this will be the co-development of distinctions-based health legislation with First Nation, Inuit and the Métis Nation and taking concrete actions to address anti-Indigenous racism in healthcare in a way informed by the lived experiences and culture of Indigenous Peoples.

We continue to work in collaboration with Indigenous partners to fully implement child and family services reforms with the objective of recognizing First Nations, Inuit and Métis jurisdiction to safeguard the best interests of their children. We are resolute in our commitment to ensuring that the best interest of the child always comes first. We recognize that central to well-being is adequate access to safe and sustainable services and infrastructure including schools, health care facilities, housing and modern public works. We will continue to work with Indigenous communities to meet their known infrastructure needs while seeking to accelerate the work to co-development distinctions-based plans to close the infrastructure gaps by 2030.

We also work to advance Indigenous self-determination by strengthening governance capacity and increasing economic opportunities to establish authentic, reciprocal nation-to-nation, Inuit-to-Crown, and government-to-government partnerships between Indigenous communities and the Government of Canada.

This Plan builds on progress that we have achieved to date, including the co-development of distinctions-based housing strategies, the advancement of Indigenous-led healthcare delivery, the affirmation of jurisdiction over child and family services, the provision of additional income assistance supports, and the establishment of a new fiscal relationship with Indigenous communities.

The respect of the land and water, the importance of Indigenous languages and cultural practices and honouring all aspects of life and the environment, including the conditions in which people are born, grow, live, and work, are well understood within traditional Indigenous approaches to well being. Our path forward must be Indigenous-led, community-based and culturally safe; First Nations, Inuit and Métis communities are entitled to first-class infrastructure, health care, social services and opportunities as all other Canadians.

We know there is a lot more to do, and we will continue this work in true partnership with Indigenous Peoples.

__________________________________________
The Honourable Marc Miller, P.C., M.P.
Minister of Indigenous Services

Plans at a glance

Indigenous Services Canada (ISC) works collaboratively with partners to improve access to high quality services for First Nations, Inuit and Métis communities. Our vision is to advance reconciliation by supporting Indigenous Peoples to deliver services and improve the socio-economic conditions in their communities, which is a key element of advancing reconciliation.

ISC uses three overarching principles as guidance in pursuing its goals which are very closely linked to each other. They are three strands of a braid. The first is co-development. At every possible opportunity, the department engages Indigenous partners in collaboration so that Indigenous communities can design and deliver services that truly fit their needs and circumstances.

The second key guiding principle is distinctions-based recognition. There are rich and profound cultural distinctions across the many First Nations, Inuit and Métis communities in Canada. This diversity is an invaluable richness of their communities, and a privilege for Canada to embrace. Recognizing this privilege is part of the Department's commitment to cultural safety and humility, ISC actively tailors its programs and services through co-development to fit the distinctions-based and diverse needs of Nations and communities, including urban Indigenous communities, wherever possible.

A third guiding principle is substantive equality. This principle is critical to ensuring the delivery of high-quality, robust services that align with real needs. It refers to the achievement of true equality in outcomes through equal access, equal opportunity, and the provision of services and benefits in a way that recognizes the diversity described in the second guiding principle. In working towards substantive equality, ISC aims to close socio-economic gaps and increase Indigenous control over delivery through the transfer the delivery of services to Indigenous control, as well as in some cases such as child and family services, explicitly recognizing Indigenous jurisdiction.

Guided by those overarching principles, in 2021–22 ISC will focus on four interconnected priority areas: (1) advancing health, (2) supporting families, (3) helping build sustainable communities, and (4) supporting Indigenous communities in self-determination. The four priority areas work together to ensure that the needs and concerns of First Nations, Inuit, Métis people are recognized, providing support everywhere that it is needed from the individual through the family, community and nation-level.

The Government of Canada recognizes that First Nations, Inuit and Métis are among the most at risk and face unique challenges in addressing COVID-19. During the COVID-19 pandemic and beyond, the health and well-being of First Nations, Inuit, and Métis has been and will remain Indigenous Services Canada's primary focus. This includes working with provinces and territories, Indigenous and health system partners to ensure that Indigenous Peoples have access to high quality public health and primary health care services no matter were they reside, and to support further actions on social determinants of health such as housing, education, and employment.

1. Advancing Health

The ongoing impact of the COVID-19 pandemic has exposed challenges in regards to the access to and provision of health care service delivery in Indigenous communities. The primary focus has been, and continues to be, supporting Indigenous leadership respond to, plan for, and prevent the negative impacts of the pandemic by working closely with Indigenous organizations and partners, other government departments, as well as provincial, territorial, and local governments. For example, investments to date have supported community-led responses to the pandemic, and providing targeted increases in primary health care resources for First Nation communities. This includes additional surge nursing capacity in remote and isolated First Nation communities where Canada is responsible for the provision of primary care, as well as public health measures to prevent the spread of COVID-19. Specifically, the efforts and investments targeted public health activities such as Personal Protective Equipment for essential workers in the community, staffing additional primary care nurses, public health nurses, paramedics and community workers, and food security to support physical isolation.

In addition to supporting immediate responses, COVID-19 has prompted a deeper examination of core services and delivery strategies required to effectively meet the healthcare needs of Indigenous populations. It has also raised questions regarding the clarity, or lack thereof, of jurisdictional responsibilities which leads to racism and gaps in access to essential services such as culturally safe primary health care. ISC will continue to work closely with Indigenous communities to support nimble and rapid responses to local and regional outbreaks, and to mitigate against future outbreaks.

In 2021–22, ISC will continue to sustain an Indigenous-led COVID-19 response, including funding, medical supports, and prioritizing access to vaccines for Indigenous Peoples and communities by partnering with Indigenous leaders, and medical experts, provinces and territories. As Canada plans for vaccine roll out, ISC has been working closely with the National Advisory Committee on Immunization (NACI), an external advisory body to the Public Health Agency of Canada, and NACI recommends that the COVID-19 vaccine should be offered to the following populations first:

  • residents and staff of congregate living settings that provide care for seniors;
  • adults 70 years of age and older, beginning with adults 80 years of age and older, then decreasing the age limit by 5-year increments to age 70 years as supply becomes available;
  • health care workers (including all those who work in health care settings and personal support workers whose work involves direct contact with patients); and
  • adults in Indigenous communities where infection can have disproportionate consequences.

In addition, the department will build on lessons learned from the pandemic by launching an examination of foundational issues, core services and delivery strategies required to better meet the healthcare needs of Indigenous communities.

ISC established regular calls with Métis Nation partners early on the pandemic to provide timely updates and share information. Over $60 million of Indigenous Community Support Fund funding was provided to Métis organizations in 2020–21. Métis Nation partners have indicated that their relationships with provincial governments has significantly affected their level of engagement and planning for regional pandemic response. This varies greatly across the country.

The Government of Canada is committed to expediting work to co-develop distinctions-based Indigenous health legislation in order to improve access to high quality and culturally-relevant health services. This is an important opportunity for ISC to work collaboratively with First Nations, Inuit and the Métis Nation, as well as provinces and territories.

The department is also working to implement a distinctions-based Indigenous mental wellness strategy in 2021–22. Indigenous populations are at greater risk of complex mental health and substance use issues than non-Indigenous populations in Canada, and mental health risks have been increased by the pressures of the COVID-19 pandemic.

Further, ISC will continue convening health system and Indigenous partners towards the elimination of anti-Indigenous racism in the health care system in 2021–22. The department will also support work to advance Joyce's Principle, in honour of Joyce Echaquan, who endured unacceptable treatment in hospital prior to her death. As defined by the Atikamekw Nation and community of Manawan, Joyce's Principle aims to guarantee for all Indigenous Peoples the right of equitable access, without any discrimination, to all social and health services, as well as the right to enjoy the best possible physical, mental, emotional and spiritual health. All of these initiatives are aimed at improving health outcomes and supporting long-term visions for flourishing, healthy Indigenous communities.

2. Supporting Families

Healthy communities depend on strong, healthy families. Accordingly, a foundational part of ISC's work is to support Indigenous children and families to be and stay together, to support Indigenous children with culturally-relevant education and upbringing, and to transfer the care and control of culturally-appropriate services to Indigenous communities. With those goals in mind, ISC will continue to implement distinctions-based child and family services reforms in 2021–22 through the Act respecting First Nations, Inuit and Métis children, youth and families (the Act), which came into force in 2020. The Act affirms the rights of Indigenous Peoples to exercise jurisdiction over child and family services, and as it continues to be adopted by more Indigenous communities, it will lead to comprehensive, culturally-specific child and family services in different communities based on principles like the best interests of the child, substantive equality and cultural continuity. Among other things, the Act aims to ensure Indigenous children stay with their own family and community and ensure that they are connected to their language and culture.

The department will continue to fully implement Jordan's Principle and all orders from the Canadian Human Rights Tribunal in order to fairly and equitably compensate First Nations children who have been negatively impacted by outdated, colonial child and family policies. Jordan's Principle ensures that all Indigenous children living in Canada can access the services and supports they need, when they need them, and is a foundational principle moving forward for ISC's child and family services reforms.

Every First Nations child deserves the best start in life – and that begins with a properly funded education system on reserve. In 2021–22, ISC will continue to build upon the co-developed policy and funding approach which supports First Nations education though predictable base funding that is more directly comparable to what students enrolled in provincial education systems receive. It also includes additional funding for language and culture and full day kindergarten. The department will continue working with Indigenous partners to support students to access high-quality education that will improve student outcomes. The department will also continue to work with First Nations to support operational and student needs as a result of the pandemic, including reviewing whether additional funding is required to support the safe return to school. The department will also continue to take steps to confirm that Indigenous post-secondary students have the supports they need to succeed and access skills and training opportunities. These education supports will help to support the goal of long-term socio-economic well-being of Indigenous families, allowing Indigenous youth to grow and learn in ways that are relevant to their unique cultures and traditions, and will help them to fully benefit from future opportunities.

3. Helping Build Sustainable Communities

Individuals and families must be able to depend on basic infrastructure like housing, water services, roads and bridges in order to fully benefit from and contribute to their communities. Building reliable and sustainable infrastructure is a critical part of improving quality of life and closing socio-economic gaps for every Indigenous community.

One of ISC's key priorities in this area is to eliminate all long-term drinking water advisories (LTDWAs) on reserve, which is part of a broader strategy to help build sustainable foundations for safe water systems. Action plans for each community with a persisting long-term drinking water advisory are in place and targeted action will take place over the next year to resolve these advisories, including acceleration measures in line with community priorities where possible. In addition, the department will support Indigenous-led engagement processes, review safe drinking water legislation, and co-develop long-term strategies for sustainable drinking water and wastewater.

ISC is supporting First Nations-led engagement processes relating to the development of a long-term strategy for water and wastewater that will help chart a path beyond 2021, focusing on closing the infrastructure gap and transitioning services to First Nation care and control. This will include the review of safe drinking water legislation which will enable the development of regulations on reserve, a key requirement for creating the right environment for the transfer of service delivery.

Further, ISC will also continue to work with Indigenous partners on co-developing distinctions-based community infrastructure plans to address critical gaps and needs by 2030.

As the global pandemic continues into 2021–22, the department will increase its focus on economic recovery post-COVID-19. ISC will continue to strengthen its relationship with key Indigenous economic stakeholders to co-develop plans and initiatives that positively assist with creating opportunities for Indigenous businesses and entrepreneurs in the rebuilding of the economy. In addition, the department will invest $332.8 million in 2021–22 to support First Nations, Inuit and Métis communities to offset declines in Own Source Revenue caused by the pandemic.

4. Supporting Indigenous Communities in Self-Determination

Indigenous Peoples have an inherent right to self-govern according to their unique cultural and historical circumstances. In striving to fulfill that right, a crucial part the department's goal of realizing equal, nation-to-nation, Inuit-to-Crown, government-to-government relationships between the Government of Canada and Indigenous Peoples is increasing governance capacity. ISC actively seeks ways in which it can provide funding for Indigenous communities to increase their capacity for managing the day-to-day business of government.

The department will focus on increasing opportunities for economic recovery post-COVID-19. This will involve working closely with Indigenous economic stakeholders to co-develop plans for rebuilding the Indigenous economy after the pandemic.

For more information on the Indigenous Services Canada's plans, priorities and planned results, see the "Core responsibilities: planned results and resources, and key risks" section of this report.

Core responsibilities: planned results and resources, and key risks

This section contains detailed information on the department's planned results and resources for each of its core responsibilities. It also contains information on key risks related to achieving those results.

Services and Benefits to Individuals

Description

These services and benefits are mainly delivered directly to Indigenous People by the department. They include, among other services and benefits, individual First Nations and Inuit clinical care and health-related benefits such as pharmacy, dental and vision care. The department is also responsible for determining individuals' entitlement to Indian registration and for the issuance of various proofs of registration, including the Secure Certificate of Indian Status (SCIS), which can be used to access various programs and services.

Planning highlights

To achieve progress in this area, ISC will focus on two departmental results.

1. Quality and timely services are delivered directly to Indigenous people
1.1 Health Services

The COVID-19 pandemic has highlighted the need for high-quality, timely health services in First Nation and Inuit communities. ISC will continue to adapt to lessons learned from the pandemic and will work to improve health outcomes in all Indigenous communities through its various programs and services.

Advancing health outcomes crucially depends on skilled health practitioners. In 2021–22, ISC will continue to implement the Nursing Recruitment and Retention Strategy and the Nursing Services Response Centre to support nurses working in Indigenous communities. This three-year campaign runs in collaboration with international partners and aims to improve health care services and health outcomes by raising the status and profile of nursing, as well as improving cultural safety and humility training in nursing schools. Following the national dialogue on Anti-Indigenous Racism in January 2021, the need to increase cultural safety was identified, as well as the recruitment and retention of Indigenous People in all health care professions. ISC will convene another national dialogue in spring 2021 to continue pursuing collective actions related to increasing Indigenous representation in post-secondary health education, cultural competency training, traditional approaches to health and safe patient navigation.

Another important part of advancing health is making it easier for First Nations and Inuit individuals to access the medical benefits to which they are entitled. In 2021–22, the department will improve client access to the Supplementary Health Benefits Program (Non-Insured Health Benefits, or NIHB) by:

  • continuing to engage with the Assembly of First Nations (AFN) on a multi-year joint review of the NIHB Program to identify and implement actions that enhance client access to benefits;
  • engaging with the government of Nunavut and Nunavut Tunngavik Incorporated on a longer term approach to health care cost pressures, including medical transportation; and
  • continuing to engage with Inuit Tapiriit Kanatami (ITK) and the National Inuit Committee on Health to find ways of improving the delivery of NIHB to Inuit clients.

The benefits provided through the NIHB Program are an essential component of ongoing efforts to diminish the substantial health disparities faced by many First Nation and Inuit individuals, and contribute to the ultimate outcome of healthier Indigenous peoples. Building on work initiated in 2020–21, ISC will maintain a particular focus on addressing the unique challenges created by the COVID-19 pandemic to ensure eligible NIHB Program clients have continued access to necessary medical items and services.

ISC is also supporting the development and implementation of distinctions-based strategies to reduce commercial tobacco use. This approach is supporting the self-determination of First Nations, Inuit and the Métis Nation to identify needs and priorities of individuals, families, communities, and health systems, and supporting Indigenous control over culturally appropriate service design and delivery. Funding has been transferred to the Métis National Council and their five Governing Members (Métis Nation of Ontario, Manitoba Métis Federation, Métis Nation of Saskatchewan, Métis Nation of Alberta, and Métis Nation of British Columbia).

1.2 Individual Affairs

In addition to health services, ISC will continue to provide direct client services across the country to determine eligibility for registration under the Indian Act, which provides access to a wide range of social and economic benefits. Eligibility is based on the degree of descent from ancestors who were registered, or were entitled to be registered, under the Indian Act. The department will also continue to issue a Secure Certificate of Indian Status (SCIS) to eligible individuals. The department plans to launch an online tool in its service kiosks that will be applied to the application process for SCIS applications. This tool will provide a more user-friendly experience for Indigenous clients and facilitate timely delivery of services.

Further, ISC will continue to support and empower First Nations in the administration of estates of the deceased, minors and dependent adults; including facilitating access to the management of their trust moneys, and supporting the delivery of treaty annuity payments. The department will continue to provide advisory services to First Nations and First Nations organizations, as well as other government departments regarding these programs.

In 2021–22, ISC will continue to improve client services offered by regional offices and in the National Capital Region. Additionally, ISC will continue to pursue partnerships with other government departments and Indigenous organizations, as well as provincial and territorial governments, to continue to improve the quality and accessibility of services delivered directly to Indigenous people, in the areas of child and family services, education, medical care and tax administration.

Since the full implementation of Bill S-3, An Act to amend the Indian Act, in 2019, all known sex-based inequities in the Indian Act have been eliminated. ISC has committed to assessing, measuring, and monitoring the impacts of Bill S-3. The department will aim to monitor the financial sustainability of potentially impacted programs and services due to an increase in the registered Indian population. A planned engagement process with First Nations will aim to address remaining non sex-based inequities and redress the residual effects of historic policy and law. The department is committed to continue to work collaboratively with First Nations in this task.

ISC will continue to develop directives, policies and communication materials to address gaps and emerging issues related to COVID-19 and its impacts on the delivery of quality and timely services.

2. Health services delivered to Indigenous Peoples contributed to improved health outcomes

Improving the quality and timely delivery of health services is a crucial aspect of improving the well-being in Indigenous communities. In 2021–22, the department will continue to improve the delivery of health services through a wide range of programs and initiatives, as well as transferring control of those services to Indigenous communities.

For example, delayed access to oral health care is one of the major factors for the progression and severity of dental decay. The Community Oral Health Services recently introduced a new treatment called Silver Diamine Fluoride in order to contribute to the improvement of the oral health status of First Nations and Inuit.

Additionally, the department will continue to fund or directly provide primary care services through its Clinical and Client Care Program to communities in remote and isolated First Nation communities. This includes providing services and supports to residents of communities with regard to COVID-19 testing, evaluation, care and vaccination. In addition, ISC will continue to develop and update policies, clinical resources and supports to nurses and health care professionals working in these communities, in areas such as clinical practice guidelines, clinical care pathways and pharmacy. Areas such as quality improvement, patient safety, accreditation and improvements in data collection to measure quality continue to be a priority. ISC will also continue to develop and update evidence-based clinical practice guidance tools to support nurses in remote and isolated Indigenous communities to provide high quality and culturally safe care.

In addition, Environmental Public Health Services in First Nation Communities South of 60° will continue to identify and prevent public health risks in environments that could adversely impact the health of community residents. The core areas of focus include drinking water, wastewater, solid waste disposal, food safety, housing, facilities inspections, environmental communicable disease control, and emergency preparedness and response. Activities include environmental public health assessment and inspection, monitoring and training and awareness.

With regard to water sanitization, ISC will continue to support clean, safe and reliable drinking water by regularly monitoring all public drinking water systems in Indigenous communities, providing residents with free bacteriological testing services for their well water, and providing public health advice for new and upgraded water treatment systems. If a First Nations community does not have a water quality monitor, an ISC Environmental Public Health Officer can perform the sampling and testing. Environmental Public Health Officers test drinking water for contaminants, maintain quality assurance and control, review and interpret drinking water quality tests, share the test results with First Nations communities, and advise Indigenous leaders on necessary actions, including issuing drinking water advisories, when drinking water is not safe.

Gender-based analysis plus (GBA+)

In 2021–22, ISC will continue to work in collaboration with Crown-Indigenous Relations and Northern Affairs Canada (CIRNAC), Women and Gender Equality Canada, and Indigenous partners to develop distinctions-based Indigenous-first GBA+ approaches and tools for use internally and externally. ISC will actively position previously approved initiatives contributing to the Government of Canada's Reconciliation agenda, responding to key elements of the Truth and Reconciliation commission and Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women and Girls National Inquiry reports, and the UN Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples. This work is intended to promote more responsive, culturally competent policies and services that meet the unique needs of Indigenous women, men, and gender diverse peoples. To advance these efforts, ISC will continue to support and work closely with the Advisory Committee on Indigenous Women's Wellbeing and national Indigenous organizations to ensure these new GBA+ approaches are designed and guided by Indigenous Peoples.

GBA+ analysis of the NIHB program has highlighted the need to provide more than 887,000 eligible First Nation and Inuit individuals with coverage for a range of medically necessary services, that are not covered by other public or private health insurance plans, regardless of their sex, gender, age, income or geographic location. There will be ongoing data collection to monitor program implementation to ensure that the desired results are being achieved and to identify any further unintended differential impacts. For example, where demand is less than anticipated, the reason for the reduced uptake will be explored to ensure that unknown or unintended barriers to access are identified and addressed.

The department also plans to expand the capacity of the Individual Affairs program to better report on gender and diversity impacts through introducing non-intrusive, flexible documentation options and having added a third, non-binary gender identifier to registration and the Secure Certificate of Indian Status. This policy direction aims to support the Government of Canada's initiative to reflect increasing recognition of gender diversity, to improve consistency across federal-provincial-territorial identity documents and to respond to complaints under the Canadian Human Rights Act.

Results-Based InnovationFootnote 1

In 2021–22, the department will continue to improve service design and delivery with the launch of an online tool in its service kiosks. The tool will first be applied to the application process for SCIS applications, and incrementally expand to support other business lines relating to registration, estates management, treaty payments and trust moneys. The vision is to move towards an improved, client-focused approach by centralizing all activities and transactions associated with an individual client in one overarching online solution. The tool will provide a more user-friendly experience for Indigenous clients and facilitate the timely delivery of services.

The NIHB program launched secure web accounts in June 2020 for providers and clients to view and update their personal information, see their claims history, benefit eligibility, status of pending requests, and electronically submit prior approvals and claims. Clients can also update their Direct Deposit information and submit appeals. In 2021–22, the department will continue to promote this new functionality and provide support to providers and clients who are interested in signing up for web accounts.

Key risks

Over the course of the past year, ISC has had to quickly respond and adapt to the COVID-19 pandemic to ensure quality and timely services are delivered directly to Indigenous Peoples, and has been forced to implement new work processes to accommodate significant changes, such as virtual work environments, social distancing and limited access to communities.

Throughout the pandemic, measures have been put in place to continue providing quality and timely services to Indigenous Peoples. Some of these measures have allowed the department to be more agile and to improve the delivery of some services. However, the rapidity at which the department has had to adapt may not be sustainable and/or possible for some communities, given their specific social, technological and economic situation, as well as their geographic remoteness, nor would it be consistent with previous application processes in place.

Furthermore, there is a risk that the high demand for health professionals within the current context may limit the department's ability to attract and retain these specialized resources. Should this risk materialize, it could significantly impact the delivery of social and health services and benefits to Indigenous Peoples.

In mitigating these risks, ISC will continue to seek innovative ways to support its employees, as well as the timely delivery of services, and ultimately support recipients with the flexibility that they require to address their own needs and priorities.

The department will take all possible measures to monitor, assess, prevent, mitigate and respond to these risks as needed throughout 2021–22.

Planned results for Services and Benefits to Individuals

Departmental result Departmental result indicator Target Date to achieve target 2017–18
actual result
2018–19
actual result
2019–20
actual result
Quality and timely services are delivered directly to Indigenous Peoples % of First Nations adults who rate the quality of health care services delivered in their community as good or excellent 57% March 2022 55.20%a 55.20%a 55.20%a
% of prior approval requests for medication coverage completed within 24 hours 100% March 2022 Not applicableb Not applicableb 99.60%
% of eligible First Nations and Inuit population who received at least one non-insured health benefit in a year 74% March 2022 72% 72.60% 72.90%c
% of eligible applicants issued a Secure Certificate of Indian Status within 16 weeks from the application date 90% March 2022 Not applicabled Not applicabled 94.12%
Health services delivered to Indigenous Peoples contribute to improved health % of First Nations and Inuit adults who reported being in very good or excellent health First Nations (on reserve): 44%

Inuit (Inuit Nunangat): 44%
March 2028 First Nations (on reserve): 37.8%a

Inuit (Inuit Nunangat): 36.9%e
First Nations (on reserve): 37.8%a

Inuit (Inuit Nunangat): 36.9%e
First Nations (on reserve): 37.8%a

Inuit (Inuit Nunangat): 36.9%e
  • a  Data is based on survey results with a five-year cycle. Last available data was from the 2015–16 Regional Health Survey.
  • b  This was a new indicator introduced in 2019–20.
  • c  The Non-Insured Health Benefit Program is an individual-based, demand-driven program. Access rates are expected to increase in the long-term due to ongoing engagement with First Nation and Inuit partners to ensure benefits meet the unique health needs of the eligible client population, greater client awareness of benefits coverage and better data collection through the Health Information and Claims Processing Services system.
  • d  The Individual Affairs program was transferred to ISC in 2019 as per Order in Council P.C. 2019-1109. Previously reported by CIRNAC as % of eligible applicants issues a SCIS within service standard, with results of 89% in 2017–18 and 93% in 2018–19.
  • e  Last available data for Inuit Nunangat is from the 2017 Aboriginal Peoples Survey.
Planned budgetary financial resources for Services and Benefits to Individuals
2021–22
budgetary spending (as indicated in Main Estimates)
2021–22
planned spending
2022–23
planned spending
2023–24
planned spending
2,006,677,872 2,006,677,872 1,996,581,074 2,223,103,661
Planned human resources for Services and Benefits to Individuals
2021–22
planned full-time equivalents
2022–23
planned full-time equivalents
2023–24
planned full-time equivalents
1,553 1,536 1,396

Financial, human resources and performance information for the Indigenous Services Canada's program inventory is available in the GC InfoBase.

Health and Social Services

Description

These services are primarily delivered in partnership with Indigenous communities and organizations, provinces/territories and agencies. Together, they focus on health and well-being for Indigenous People. They include health services to strengthen Indigenous communities in areas such as healthy living, communicable disease control, healthy child development and community care. They also include social services with an emphasis on children and families, as well as education services from kindergarten to post-secondary.

Planning highlights

To achieve progress in this area, ISC will focus on three departmental results.

1. Indigenous Peoples and communities are healthier

As noted above, one of ISC's key priorities in 2021–22 is to sustain COVID-19 funding and supports and prioritize access to vaccines for vulnerable Indigenous populations, in order to assist Indigenous communities in combatting the spread of the pandemic.

Activities related to the COVID-19 pandemic are broad and are coordinated with communities and other stakeholders in an advisory role at the community, regional and national levels in order to coordinate efforts, as well as provide expertise and guidance on public health issues and risks across both built and natural environments. ISC's Environmental Public Health Service Program will continue to provide core programming to identify and prevent environmental public health risks that could adversely impact the health of community residents. This work includes:

  • active involvement in Emergency Operation Centres;
  • outbreak management support, technical expertise and assessment regarding planning and operation of isolation centers and mobile shelters;
  • effective implementation of COVID-19 preventive measures;
  • measures related to community infrastructure such as drinking water, wastewater and solid waste services;
  • maintaining confidence in the safety of drinking water systems in collaboration with Community Based Drinking Water Monitors and Water Treatment Plant Operators; and
  • training and education on environmental public health measures such as personal preventative measures, food safety, infection control and prevention, and environmental cleaning.

ISC will continue to support communities to more effectively manage and respond during the pandemic and to improve healthy housing through the development of a distinctions-based housing strategy and transformational activities.

Although the COVID-19 pandemic has created additional challenges in the work towards Tuberculosis (TB) elimination, ISC will work in 2021–22 to enhance planning for communicable disease outbreaks, accelerate partnerships at community and inter-governmental levels, increase access to rapid testing systems, and provide more training opportunities for community based workers that can support TB elimination post-pandemic. Additionally, awareness has increased around social determinants of health, impacts on public health and the importance of rapid access to data. ISC will continue to work collaboratively with Indigenous partners and provincial and territorial counterparts to support efforts towards prevention and elimination, including with the Inuit Public Health Task Group.

With regard to sexually transmitted infections, ISC will continue to collaborate with Indigenous organizations, partners, provinces, territories and communities to support community led multidisciplinary, distinction-based approaches to sexually transmitted infections and blood-borne infections prevention, education, awareness and facilitate access to culturally safe testing, treatment and support services (e.g. the Know Your Status Program in Saskatchewan).

ISC will also continue to support its multi-year capital projects and high priority repairs for health facilities. In addition, infrastructure repairs to substance use treatment centres for First Nations communities will also be considered. Norway House Cree Nation is positioned to receive a total of $100 million in capital funding to construct a Health Centre of Excellence and the required supporting health care professional accommodations space to replace the current outdated infrastructure. To date, Norway House has received $60 million with another $25 million planned to be transferred in 2021–22. The health facility construction is transitioning from the foundation phase to structural steel installation; substantial completion is expected in spring of 2022. This includes the continued funding and implementation of projects funded through Budget 2018.

2. Indigenous Peoples receive social services that respond to community needs

ISC emphasizes an approach to the design and delivery of social services that is based on substantive equality, co-development in partnership with Indigenous leaders, and distinctions-based recognition in a way that tailors those services to the needs of specific communities both on and off reserve.

One of ISC's key priorities in 2021–22 is to launch the co-development of distinctions-based health legislation with First Nations, Inuit, and Métis Nation partners to improve Indigenous Peoples' access to high-quality and culturally-relevant health services. This legislation will promote greater Indigenous control over health services, provide certainty on roles and responsibilities in providing those services, and ensure that distinctions-based health services remain tailored to the needs of specific communities. The co-development process will continue throughout 2021 with First Nations, Inuit, Métis, provincial and territorial partners, as well as other organizations and subject-matter experts.

Further, ISC will continue working with Indigenous partners to advance the 2020 Speech from the Throne commitment to support a distinctions-based mental health and wellness strategy. Compared to non-Indigenous populations, suicide rates are three times higher for First Nations, nine times higher for Inuit and two times higher for Métis populations in Canada. To address those issues, the department will work with First Nations, Inuit, and Métis Nation partners to advance a long-term approach for mental wellness involving a wide range of high quality, distinctions-based services. First Nations and Inuit leaders have already developed in-depth mental wellness approaches.

ISC's work in keeping families together forms a foundational part of providing distinctions-based social services. In the coming fiscal year, ISC will proactively seek to ensure that families at risk receive support and prevention services designed to keep families together and keep children in their communities, connected to their language and culture. The department will continue to work to fully implement all orders of the Canadian Human Rights Tribunal with regard to reforming child and family services and establishing a flexible, distinctions-based funding model. ISC will continue to collaborate with Indigenous leaders to design and implement these reforms through a variety of consultation mechanisms, including the Consultation Committee on Child Welfare and the National Advisory Committee on First Nations Child and Family Services (FNCFS) Program Reform, which include representation from Indigenous Regional Authorities, First Nations political organizations, FNCFS agencies and provincial and territorial authorities.

One of the key reforms to ISC's First Nations CFS program is the implementation of the Act respecting First Nations, Inuit and Métis children, youth and families (the Act). Contributing to the implementation of the UNDRIP, and addressing Truth and Reconciliation Commission Call to Action #4 (enabling Indigenous child-welfare legislation that establishes national standards for Indigenous child apprehension and custody), the Act is a major step in allowing Indigenous communities to fulfill their own visions for child and family services in their communities. With funding received through the Economic and Fiscal Snapshot 2020, ISC will continue to implement the Act, in collaboration with Indigenous partners, developing laws and program models that address the unique cultures and circumstances of their communities. ISC expects as many as 60 coordination tables under the Act could begin in the next four years, signaling in-depth, advanced discussions for the implementation of community-specific child and family services.

In addition to reforms to the First Nations CFS terms and conditions and funding models, ISC will continue to explore options to enhance capacity for managing claims and improvements in information management. Maximizing the influence of First Nations in the design and delivery of these services will ensure that they effectively address the needs of different communities in culturally appropriate ways.

In 2021–22, ISC will continue to invest $186.8 million into supportive care in Indigenous communities to help strengthen their health and social services in preparation for continued waves of COVID-19, through methods such as improved monitoring and wage subsidies for essential workers. The supportive care system includes services at home, in long-term care facilities, and through other assisted living arrangements, for people needing these services on a regular basis. After delays caused by the pandemic, ISC will re-initiate the engagement with First Nations and Inuit communities to co-develop options for a continuum of long-term care services.

Another important part of providing social services aimed at supporting families, especially in the context of the pandemic, is income assistance. The department will continue to collaborate with First Nations on finalizing the Income Assistance national summary report on the 2018–2020 First Nations-led Income Assistance engagement process, and will aim to better understand the changing needs of individuals and families on reserve as a result of the pandemic. ISC will work to develop distinctions-based options to inform future program changes and funding requirements in order to meet community-specific needs and lead to improved Indigenous self-determination through employment and education opportunities.

3. Indigenous students receive an inclusive and quality education

Education is crucial to closing the socio-economic gap between Indigenous Peoples and non-Indigenous peoples. It lays the foundation that supports Indigenous Peoples, families and communities to contribute to and fully benefit from the Canadian economy by accelerating socio-economic growth and reducing barriers to employment.

In 2021–22, ISC will seek to establish and implement components of a Canada-wide early learning and childcare system that reaches school-aged children on reserve. The department will continue to support First Nations in the development and implementation of regional education agreements that respect First Nations control over First Nations education. These regional agreements will seek to define roles and responsibilities among First Nations communities and service providers, establish mutual accountability mechanisms to support improved student outcomes and address the education goals and priorities of communities. These regional agreements will include continued investments in institutional capacity-building, research and innovation as well as strengthened partnerships between First Nations and provincial or territorial education systems.

In addition, the department will continue to build on the success and lessons learned from the co-developed policy framework for First Nations elementary and secondary education on reserve. The new co-developed approach to funding is aimed at ensuring that students in First Nations schools are supported by predictable funding comparable to provincial education systems, as well as expanded language and culture programs, and full-time kindergarten in First Nations schools. ISC is committed to ongoing collaboration with First Nations partners to identify ongoing needs and emerging priorities for elementary and secondary education on reserves. In addition, the department will continue to implement timely emergency funding to support safe First Nations elementary and secondary education during the pandemic.

With regard to post-secondary Indigenous education, ISC will continue to implement co-developed, distinctions-based education strategies for First Nations, Inuit and Métis Nation students. These strategies will support increased access to, and enable greater success in, post-secondary education for Indigenous students by providing funding and complementary services as well as strengthen governance capacity. In addition, the First Nations Post-Secondary Education Strategy includes supports for First Nation-led engagement to develop comprehensive, integrated, long-term regional post-secondary education models, which are currently underway. As with elementary and secondary education, ISC will support the implementation of timely emergency funding to support First Nations, Inuit and Métis Nation post-secondary students and institutions during the pandemic.

Improved education services lead to improved employment opportunities. The 2020 Speech from the Throne committed to "scaling up the Youth Employment and Skills Strategy" as a means to restore pre-COVID 19 employment levels. This included $30.6 million for the Strategy to support employment and skills development opportunities for Indigenous youth during the pandemic. This investment is expected to reach approximately 1800 youth.

Under the Youth Employment and Skills Strategy, the ISC-led First Nations and Inuit Youth Employment Strategy (FNIYES) supports initiatives that provide First Nations and Inuit students and youth aged 15–30 with work experience by providing incentives and supports to employers to hire and retain First Nations youth on reserve and Inuit youth outside of land-claim areas. With a program investment of $169.7 million in funding since 2016–17, approximately 5,800 First Nations and Inuit youth receive services annually via FNIYES. In 2021–22, the department will continue delivering education and social skills development programming and will implement the results of engagement on ISC's First Nations and Inuit Youth Employment Strategy, and will work with Employment and Social Development Canada to increase employment supports for Indigenous youth.

Gender-based analysis plus (GBA+)

Investments in the Healthy Living Program support the ultimate outcome of improved health in First Nations and Inuit individuals and communities, which aligns with the Gender Based Framework pillar "Poverty reduction, health and well-being." The Program monitors data from relevant Indigenous-led surveys, such as the Regional Health Survey (First Nations) to identify gender and diversity specific data. Funding recipients and communities direct Healthy Living investments according to their needs and priorities, which often include targeting specific genders.

Through the implementation of the Act respecting First Nations, Inuit and Métis children, youth and families, the department is working closely with the Public Health Agency of Canada to ensure that information related to Indigenous children, disaggregated by gender, will be included in the Canadian Child Welfare Information System. Some communities, agencies and organizations across the country have expressed the need for new performance measures and data systems to address the unique requirements of child and family services and to respect Indigenous data sovereignty. These data improvements will allow for continued monitoring of outcomes, particularly those related to sex and gender, and ensure equity in the provision of prevention support and services to meet the needs of children, youth and families.

GBA+ has a significant and direct impact on the Family Violence Prevention Program (FVPP). By providing operational funding to 46 emergency shelters in First Nations communities and supporting family violence prevention programming, the FVPP assists Indigenous women and children escaping violence. In May 2020, the Government of Canada announced $44.8 million over five years to build 10 new shelters in First Nations communities and two in the territories to help protect Indigenous women and children fleeing domestic violence. Additionally, the 2020 Fall Economic Statement announced $724.1 million to launch a comprehensive Violence Prevention Strategy to expand access to a continuum of culturally relevant supports for Indigenous women, children and LGBTQ and two-spirit people facing gender based violence. This strategy will support new shelters and transition housing for First Nations, Inuit and Métis across the country, including on reserve, and in the North and in urban areas. On January 26, 2021, the Government of Canada committed to fund the construction and operations of shelters for Inuit women and children across Inuit Nunangat as well as in urban centres through this initiative.

Through collaboration with its regional colleagues and network of shelters, the FVPP is currently in the process of redeveloping its Data Collection Instrument in order to better integrate a GBA+ lens. In doing so, the FVPP will be better able to monitor and report on shelter access and needs among the network of shelters and within First Nations communities.

Results-Based Innovation

ISC will implement several innovative, distinctions-based approaches to child and family service programs in 2021–22. For example, the department is forecasting an enhancement to the Community Well-Being and Jurisdiction Initiative. ISC will advance with First Nations partners some recommendations of the Institute of Fiscal Studies and Democracy Report entitled Funding First Nations Child and Family Services: A Performance Budget Approach, with the goal of improving the funding structure and performance measurement of the FNCFS program. With regard to engagement with Indigenous leaders on the ongoing implementation of the Act respecting First Nations, Inuit and Métis children, youth and families, the department will continue to advance co-development and improve the sharing of inter-jurisdictional data reporting to address the over-representation of Indigenous children and youth in care. ISC is seeking to set up a table on data under the Joint National Working Group created for the Canada-Assembly of First Nations Protocol to support implementation of the Act. Distinctions-based working groups are planned to start in early 2021 to co-develop data and reporting strategies with Indigenous, provincial and territorial partners, along with experts in child and family services and data.

Further, the co-development approach that will be used to engage Indigenous partners on the design and delivery of continuum of long-term care services is heavily centred on First Nations and Inuit culture and will represent significant innovation in the way health and social services are designed. This may include improved policy guidance and funding options for multi-use facilities which may combine compatible elements of residential options with services like addictions treatment, adult foster care, family violence shelters and prevention, fetal alcohol system disorder treatment, early childhood learning, home care, long-term care, day programming, seniors retirement living and other elements in a culturally-relevant and safe context.

Finally, feedback received through the First Nations-led Income Assistance engagement process is expected to lead to the co-development of incremental policy and program improvements. Next steps could include consideration of innovative approaches and pilot projects.

Key risks

One of the main uncertainties related to health and social services is the redirection of health resources required to address the pandemic, which may continue to impact the department's and communities' capacities to address other pressing health concerns. There is also a risk that additional waves of COVID-19, or multiple concurrent events, may reduce the department's ability to deliver regular programs and services, and may severely limit the communities' resilience.

The pandemic and associated public health restrictions could continue to cause a wide range of challenges and uncertainties for ISC's child and family services programs, including challenges relating to consultation and engagement processes with Indigenous partners, and in-person program operations. Despite these challenges, the department will continue to be flexible so that all government and Indigenous stakeholders involved in the delivery and reform of child and family services continue to be well positioned for engagement. For example, ISC will continue to make concessions for reporting requirement deadlines and claim submissions, which were significantly affected by the 2020 lockdown. The department will continue to provide additional flexibility and support to Indigenous communities that might delay their exercise of jurisdiction under the new Indigenous child and family service legislation where those communities are focusing instead on public health measures.

With regard to social services in general, one of the key risks being faced is that lockdown and social distancing measures may lead to under-reporting on some key social metrics (e.g. family violence, mental wellness), which may reduce the department's and communities' ability to adequately identify and address community needs.

Further, there is a risk that increased volume of incoming requests for health and social services may affect the department's ability to process and deliver decisions within compliance timelines. Finally, the ability for communities and ISC to attract and retain skilled and qualified personnel on reserve (e.g. nurses, technicians, teachers, environmental public health officers, and others) may be at risk due to a number of factors, including social and economic (e.g. additional demands on staff due to the pandemic, combined with surge capacity needs in health authorities), caused Environmental Program Health Officers to leave ISC, thereby reducing the capacity to meet program functions in communities.

The department will take all possible measures to monitor, assess, prevent, mitigate and respond to these risks as needed throughout 2021–22.

Planned results for Health and Social Services

Departmental result Departmental result indicator Target Date to achieve target 2017–18
actual result
2018–19
actual result
2019–20
actual result
Indigenous Peoples and communities are healthier Active tuberculosis incidence rate among Inuit living in Inuit Nunangat Three-year average of 0 cases per 100,000 population March 2030 Not applicablea Not applicablea 200.0
(2015–2017)

189.9
(2014–2016)

181.3
(2013–2015)b
Active tuberculosis incidence rate among First Nations on reserve Three-year average of 22 cases per 100,000 population March 2028 Not applicablea Not applicablea 26.3
(2015–2017)

26.5
(2014–2016)

26.7
(2013–2015)b
Rate of newly reported cases of HIV among First Nations Three-year average of 19 cases per 100,000 population March 2028 Not applicablea Not applicablea 15.0
(2016–2018)

13.6
(2015–2017)

13.2
(2014–2016)c
% of First Nations adults with diabetes accessing newer, novel medications and not on insulin 20% March 2022 Not applicablea Not applicablea 24.50%
Indigenous Peoples receive social services that respond to community needs % of First Nations and Inuit communities with access to mental wellness team services 50% March 2022 47% 50% 50%
% of First Nations communities offering family support services aimed at keeping families together To be established with partners by March 2021d To be established with partners by March 2021d Not applicablea Not applicablea 51%
% of First Nations children on reserve in care To be established with partners by March 2021e To be established with partners by March 2021e 6% 5.77% Not availablef
% of residents living on reserve who are supported through Income Assistance To be established with partners by March 2023g To be established with partners by March 2023g Not applicable 27.70% Not availableh
# of individuals who received services under Urban Programming for Indigenous Peoples To be established by March 2022d To be established with partners by March 2022 Not applicablea Not applicablea Not availablei
Indigenous students receive an inclusive and quality education # of First Nations students who are provided full-day kindergarten services in First Nations administered schools To be established with partners by March 2022d To be established with partners by March 2023j Not applicablek Not applicablek 8,089
% of students attending First Nations administered schools who are taught at least one subject in a First Nations language Interim target: 89–93%

Final target to be established with partners by March 2022(d, l)
To be established with partners by March 2023l Not applicable 88.60% 82%m
% of First Nations on reserve students who graduate from secondary school Interim target: increase percentage over time

Final target to be established with partners by March 2022n
To be established with partners by March 2023 41% 40.50%p 39.90%p
# of funded First Nations, Inuit, Métis students who graduate with a post-secondary degree/diploma/certificate Interim targets: First Nations: 4,110–4,494

Inuit: 50

Métis: TBD

Final targets to be developed with First Nations, Inuit and Métis partners by March 2022(j, l, o)
March 2025 3,686 3,852p 3,602p
  • a  This was a new indicator introduced in 2019–20.
  • b  Latest tuberculosis data provided by the Canadian Tuberculosis Reporting System (CTBRS), Public Health Agency of Canada (PHAC), 2010–2017. The CTBRS is a case-based surveillance system that maintains non-nominal data on people diagnosed with active TB disease in Canada. Data is collected annually from the provinces and territories, analyzed by the PHAC, and validated by each province and territory. Note that this data does not include British Columbia.
  • c  Latest HIV data provided by the National HIV/AIDS Surveillance System (HASS), PHAC, 2011–2018. The HASS system is a passive case-based surveillance system that collates data voluntarily submitted to PHAC from all provincial and territorial public health authorities. Note that this data should be interpreted with caution as it does not include British Columbia, Quebec, or Saskatchewan. Ethnicity data is either not reported by these provinces or not disaggregated by Indigenous subgroup.
  • d  Efforts are underway to establish targets in the context of co-development and engagement with Indigenous partners rather than being set unilaterally.
  • e  The Department continues to engage with Indigenous partners including the Consultation Committee on Child Welfare and the National Advisory Committee on First Nations Child and Family Services Program Reform to examine the suite of Program outcomes and their indicators. The Institute of Fiscal Studies and Democracy (IFSD) also recently released a report with wide-ranging recommendations for reforming the delivery of First Nations child and family services. Discussions with partners and consideration of IFSD's recommendations will help form the basis for a new performance measurement framework and options for a new Program funding methodology. A target date is to be determined.
  • f  Based on the current reporting cycle, the most recent finalized data is from 2018–19. Recipient reporting/data submissions have not been finalized for the 2019–20 fiscal year.
  • g  A national engagement process and joint technical working group with the Assembly of First Nations is underway to co-develop indicators and targets. In the meantime, the department will aim to decrease the percentage. Data compilation and reporting for this program is typically one year behind the year it covers. Target and date to achieve will be defined with First Nations partners by March 2023 through the evaluation response plan since the program is expected to undergo reforms and changes to indicators may occur. COVID-19 may also impact the timelines.
  • h  Data compilation and reporting for this program is typically one year behind the year it covers.
  • i  Final 2020–21 Activity Reports to be completed by Urban Programming for Indigenous Peoples recipients have been delayed due to COVID-19. Without these reports, the results cannot be analyzed and the target cannot be identified.
  • j  To ensure co-development processes provide sufficient time to meet the needs of all partners that need to be consulted the timeframe has been extended until March 2022 to provide such time for adequate engagement.
  • k  Due to programming changes, 2019–20 was the first year of data collection and reporting on this indicator.
  • l  An interim target was previously established, however, this target was not established/co-developed with Indigenous partners. The final target is to be established with partners by March 2022.
  • m  As of 2019–20, this indicator is collected in aggregate form rather than individual student data. As a result, 2019–20 is the first year of baseline data for the new method of collection for this indicator. The result for this indicator in 2019–20 is lower than previous years due to the new method of collection.
  • n  The department is developing a new graduation rate methodology in response to the 2018 OAG audit. Baseline data first needs to be generated using this new methodology before targets can be established. Baseline data for this new methodology is expected to be generated during the 2021–22 fiscal year.
  • o  As a result of the new Inuit and Métis Post-Secondary Strategies, baseline data is not yet available for this indicator for Inuit and Métis.
  • p  Due to the program reporting cycle which is based on the school year, data is reported in the year after it is received.
Planned budgetary financial resources for Health and Social Services
2021–22
budgetary spending (as indicated in Main Estimates)
2021–22
planned spending
2022–23
planned spending
2023–24
planned spending
5,837,808,255 5,837,808,255 5,397,624,340 5,634,901,559
Planned human resources for Health and Social Services
2021–22
planned full-time equivalents
2022–23
planned full-time equivalents
2023–24
planned full-time equivalents
1,538 1,318 1,400

Financial, human resources and performance information for the Indigenous Services Canada's program inventory is available in the GC InfoBase.

Governance and Community Development

Description

These services are commonly delivered in partnership with Indigenous communities and institutions and are focused on strong community governance and physical foundations. They include supports for governance capacity in areas such as community planning and financial management. They also include support for investments in community infrastructure, land and resource management, and economic development.

Planning highlights

To achieve progress in this area, ISC will focus on four departmental results.

1. Indigenous communities advance their governance capacity

In order to advance reconciliation and support Indigenous communities in self-determination, an important part of the department's focus involves providing funding and other supports for Indigenous governments to increase their governance capacity and carry out the day-to-day business operations of government. Effective governance not only supports the transfer of services but is also key to socio-economic progress and the overall well-being of Indigenous communities. ISC will continue to support Indigenous communities in implementing and developing strong, effective, sustainable governments in support of Canada's constitutional and statutory obligations. At the same time, the department recognizes the need to break away from colonial approaches and do things in a new way—where Indigenous communities lead the way by facilitating capacity development for their own governments, institutions and leadership.

The Economic and Fiscal Snapshot 2020 included renewed investments in governance capacity development ($24.2 million in 2020–21 and $24.2 million in 2021–22). In 2021–22, with these renewed investments, ISC will continue to advance the Indigenous Community Development National Strategy, as well as continue to support Indigenous communities in strengthening their governance capacity and advancing Indigenous self-determination through community-led plans. The department will continue to uphold and implement the Truth and Reconciliation Commission Call to Action #57 (providing increased cultural and historical training to public servants) and Article 23 of the UNDRIP (inclusion of Indigenous Peoples in the development and administration of health and socio-economic programs that affect them) through the delivery of Indigenous Community Development training to federal employees to enhance cultural competency in the public service.

2. Indigenous Peoples have reliable and sustainable infrastructure

With regard to the COVID-19 pandemic, the department will continue to support Indigenous communities in preventing, monitoring and responding to public health needs, including support for surge health infrastructure solutions and implementing community-level public health plans and collective emergency responses.

In addition to increasing governance capacity, community development requires reliable and sustainable infrastructure in order to provide a platform capable of supporting healthy communities. One of the most important infrastructure needs in many Indigenous communities today is having safe, clean and reliable drinking water and wastewater systems. In 2021–22, ISC will continue to work in partnership with Indigenous communities towards eliminating all long-term drinking water advisories (LTDWAs) on public systems on reserves, and will continue to take steps to ensure that water stays safe to drink.

As of January 28, 2021, there were 57 LTDWAs in effect on public systems on reserves in 39 First Nations communities. As the COVID-19 pandemic continues to evolve, new access restrictions are being imposed in some communities. Supply chains face delays. Additionally, issues typical on any infrastructure project, such as weather, site conditions, and construction challenges, continue to require mitigation. ISC continues to support First Nations in their pandemic response and plans are in place to support continuity of water and wastewater service provision throughout the pandemic, including eliminating drinking water advisories.

The Government of Canada remains committed to ensuring that all First Nations communities have access to safe, clean and reliable drinking water. One specific aspect of this commitment is the ongoing implementation of an action plan aimed at eliminating all long-term drinking water advisories affecting public systems on reserve. Initiatives are underway to address all remaining long-term drinking water advisories.

Since 2016, the Government of Canada has made $2.19 billion in commitments to First Nations to build and repair water and wastewater infrastructure and support effective management and maintenance of water systems on reserves.

In November 2020, an additional $1.5 billion was announced to help accelerate the work being done to end all long-term drinking water advisories on public systems on reserves, to better support the operation and maintenance of systems, and to continue program investments in water and wastewater infrastructure. This funding includes $616.3 million over six years, and $114.1 million ongoing, to increase the support provided for operations and maintenance of water and wastewater infrastructure on reserves.

Initiatives are underway to address all remaining LTDWAs. As part of the $1.5 billion in water and wastewater infrastructure investments announced in the 2020 Fall Economic Statement, $309.8 million was announced to continue work to lift all LTDWAs on public systems on reserves as soon as possible. ISC will continue to work with affected First Nations to address their advisories and the underlying causes of advisories. Every advisory is unique and ISC is exploring every possible solution with community leadership to be able to successfully lift all LTDWAs.

However, infrastructure needs go far beyond water systems. Among other things, the pandemic has emphasized the need for safe and enhanced infrastructure, including repairing and improving roads, bridges, homes, schools, fire protection systems and waste management. Throughout 2021–22, ISC will engage with Indigenous partners to identify critical infrastructure gaps in Indigenous communities and to begin co-developing distinctions-based, long-term infrastructure plans, designed to address them. ISC will continue to enhance the community infrastructure program on reserve by reviewing and updating program policies in collaboration with First Nations. The policy updates aim to better reflect the changing operational needs of the infrastructure program and to better support Indigenous self-determination in building and managing their own infrastructure assets. The department will continue to actively co-develop service delivery models that transfer the control of housing and infrastructure programs to Indigenous institutions.

In 2021–22, ISC also plans to finalize funding agreements for the construction of Mercury Treatment Centres in two First Nations communities affected by mercury contamination. In addition to the millions of dollars provided to victims of mercury contamination in the Asubpeeschoseewagong Netum Anishinabek and Wabaseemoong First Nations, along with annual testing and monitoring, the department plans to fund the construction and operation of Mercury Treatment Centres in both communities. Over the next two years, in collaboration with Indigenous leaders and the Province of Ontario, ISC will support the construction of the Mercury Treatment Centres. The Centres will include highly specialized treatment services, and a new water treatment plant, which will accompany the Mercury Treatment Centre in Asubpeeschoseewagong Netum Anishinabek.

The department will also continue to support First Nations communities to plan and implement projects that reduce dependence on diesel-powered electricity on reserves, and will support Indigenous-led efforts to implement renewable electricity options such as solar, hydro and wind. In doing so, ISC will promote collaboration with Indigenous partners on developing clean energy solutions.

ISC will continue to co-develop innovative approaches to emergency service delivery, including multilateral agreements with provinces and territories, service providers, or partnerships that support distinctions-based, community-specific needs. The Emergency Management Assistance Program (EMAP) will continue to work with other programs and partners to identify linkages between emergency management planning and mitigation with broader infrastructure initiatives and policies. For instance, leveraging the assessments funded through the EMAP and risk assessment data could help inform and support components of infrastructure projects that would help mitigate the impacts of smoke from wildland fires. Another example of this is the partnership with the Aboriginal Firefighters Association of Canada to develop a National Indigenous Fire Safety Council (formerly known as the Indigenous Fire Marshal Project). In 2021–22, ISC will continue to support the development of scope, governance structure and program delivery options for the Council with an objective of helping to close the gap in the level of fire protection services in Indigenous communities.

In addition, the department is working with Public Safety Canada, other government departments, and the Assembly of First Nations to review options for First Nations Home Flood Insurance, gain a better understanding of the unique contexts on reserves, and identify gaps.

3. Land and resources in Indigenous communities are sustainably managed

Strong and reliable infrastructure must be accompanied by effective land and resource management in order to maintain sustainable communities in years to come. For example, investments in waste management are critical to protecting and reducing potential risks to health and safety. In that vein, ISC will extend the First Nations Waste Management Initiative into 2021–22 and beyond with the goal of providing First Nations communities with services comparable to those available off-reserve. Guided by the advice of the National Indigenous Advisory Committee on Solid Waste Management, the First Nations Waste Management Initiative will continue to increase the portion of funding and services delivered directly by Indigenous partner organizations, and will support Indigenous employment in the delivery of waste management services.

ISC will continue to work with First Nations to reduce environmental risks, and risks to human health and safety, through the assessment and remediation of contaminated sites on reserve lands via the Contaminated Sites On Reserve Program and the Federal Contaminated Sites Action Plan. The department will continue its collaboration with Environment and Climate Change Canada, as well as Indigenous leaders, to identify and co-develop options to address environmental issues on reserve, including addressing existing regulatory and capacity gaps. ISC will continue to support impact assessment processes for projects both on and off-reserves to ensure that Indigenous communities are not adversely impacted by development and resource extraction projects on their lands and territories. In this context, the department will continue to support the Indigenous Centre for Cumulative Effects, including the development of tools and resources to enhance Indigenous capacity for environmental monitoring and management. ISC's investments will take into consideration potential challenges due to COVID-19, and will consider contingency projects in light of ongoing restrictions in communities, including options where site work can be isolated from community residents.

In 2021–22, in partnership with Indigenous organizations, the department will also continue to modernize reserve land and natural resources policies in the Lands Management Manual to improve land administration under the Indian Act. Given the impacts of COVID-19 and the need to reduce risks associated with physical gatherings, while ensuring that First Nations have the necessary tools to advance economic development and land management objectives, the department continues to explore options to modernize the Indian Referendum Regulations. These options include regulatory amendments to enable online voting and expanding First Nations' role in referendum administration.

ISC also plans to modernize its Lands, Resources and Environmental Management Information Technology Systems, such as the National Additions to Reserve Tracking System (NATS), the Resource Information Management System 2 (RIMS2) for oil and gas royalty management, the Integrated Environment Management System (IEMS), and the Indian Land Registry System (ILRS), to enhance service delivery to Indigenous communities and partners using innovative technologies. The department will continue to provide operational support to First Nations in advancing their additions to reserve proposals pursuant to settlement agreements or to support community and economic development. The department will also continue the incremental work to reform the Reserve Land and Environment Program to provide support for First Nations managing their lands under the Indian Act, in collaboration with the National Aboriginal Land Managers Association. These supports will include continued investment for training First Nation land managers through the Professional Land Managers Certification Program, and seeking improved funding, among other resources and services.

At a minimum, ISC plans to support 10 new First Nations signatories to the Framework Agreement on First Nation Land Management, and will continue to support Indigenous-led community land use planning for a minimum of 25 First Nations, including land surveys to enhance planning and management and to facilitate economic development. ISC will increase support for the devolution of capacity development programming to national Indigenous institutions such as the First Nations Land Management Resource Centre and the National Aboriginal Land Managers Association, along with fostering the growth of regional service delivery hubs where appropriate. The department also plans to transition its support for First Nations law-making, enforcement and training with respect to matrimonial real property after the sunset of the formal Matrimonial Real Property program at the end of 2020–21.

4. Indigenous communities build economic prosperity

Where there is reliable infrastructure and effective land and resource management, there are conditions that encourage opportunities for economic growth. Unfortunately, the global pandemic has shifted the allocation of resources away from regular business supports toward a crisis-management emphasis on keeping small and medium-sized Indigenous businesses afloat. Instead of lending for business creation or expansion, the focus has been on working with the National Aboriginal Capital Corporations Association (NACCA) and the Métis Capital Corporations (MCC) to provide grants and loans to cover basic operating costs and avoid bankruptcy.

In 2021–22, ISC will continue to work with Indigenous-owned businesses, entrepreneurs and the tourism sector to support the growth of the Indigenous economy. ISC will continue to modernize its economic development programs, and collaborate with Indigenous communities on developing a federal Indigenous tourism strategy. Additionally, ISC will continue to work with Public Services and Procurement Canada to create more opportunities for Indigenous businesses to grow by creating a new target of at least 5% of federal contracts awarded to Indigenous-led organizations.

Under the Strategic Partnerships Initiative, ISC and Public Services and Procurement Canada are supporting various capacity-building projects and offering additional navigator resources to indigenous entrepreneurs in order to win federal contracts.

In the context of COVID-19, the department is providing support to Indigenous businesses through three separate programs to deliver:

  • $306.8 million via the network of Aboriginal Financial Institutions and the five Métis Capital Corporations. These funds provide support to small and medium size businesses, and their entrepreneurs, in the form of grants and loans to cover operating expenses during the pandemic;
  • $133 million for support directly to collectively owned Indigenous businesses, such as First Nation band-owned business, as well as support to micro entrepreneurs and tourism businesses; and
  • $332.8 million allocated to partially off-set the loss of own-source revenue of collectively owned businesses where these revenues were being used to pay for critical services at the community level.

The first two programs are far into the delivery stage while the latter support program was announced more recently and is just getting underway.

In 2021–22, the department's focus will primarily remain on providing supports to Indigenous businesses that will help them to get through the pandemic and position for strong recovery post-pandemic. ISC will track and report on indicators specifically related to emergency COVID-19 supports, and will continue to strengthen its relationship with the NACCA and the MCC in order to co-develop plans for rebuilding the Indigenous economy after the pandemic. In addition, the department will invest $332.8 million in 2021–22 to support First Nations, Inuit and Métis communities to fund important programs that were impacted by loss of Own Source Revenue caused by the pandemic.

ISC will continue to work with Indigenous-owned businesses, entrepreneurs and the tourism sector to support the growth of the Indigenous economy. ISC will also continue to modernize its economic development programs, and collaborate with Indigenous communities on developing a federal Indigenous tourism strategy. The department will continue to work with Public Services and Procurement Canada and the Treasury Board Secretariat to create more opportunities for Indigenous businesses to grow by creating a new target of at least 5% of federal contracts awarded to Indigenous-led organizations.

Gender-based analysis plus

In 2021–22, ISC and its federal partners will support and engage Indigenous organizations to collect data on vulnerable sub-populations to understand the barriers they face, identify program and service gaps, and co-develop solutions to address them. In 2020–21, the Native Women's Association of Canada produced Indigenous Housing: Policy and Engagement - Final Report to Indigenous Services Canada, which outlined best practices to be applied across the country in support of housing needs for people living with a disability, Indigenous women and families, youth, and LGBTQ2+ persons. ISC is providing funding for a subsequent report, which is anticipated to be completed and presented in 2021–22. The report will summarize the impacts of COVID-19 on housing for Indigenous women.

Through the Aboriginal Entrepreneurship Program, ISC has approved almost $0.5 million in funding for the Native Women's Association of Canada to deliver a project entitled "Finding Our Way Safely: Addressing the role of transportation safety in violence against Indigenous women, girls, and gender-diverse people". This project will develop and deliver training for transportation and hospitality services and operators, focusing on creating an understanding of the sexism and racism experienced by Indigenous women, Two Spirit and gender diverse people, risks they experience while travelling, signs of human trafficking and exploitation, as well as strategies to offer assistance and increased safety while travelling.

Results-Based Innovation

In 2021–22, ISC will support and promote innovative approaches that enhance sustainable operations and maintenance of First Nations-owned water and wastewater facilities, including working with Tribal Councils and other Indigenous Representative Organizations to pilot the development and delivery of Centralized Water and Wastewater Hub services to help First Nations communities support the effective operation of their water systems. The department will also continue to support two procurement pilot projects in Indigenous communities, involving Indigenous-specific tenders on water and wastewater projects.

Further, ISC will work with interested Indigenous partners on proof-of-concept projects and the development of service delivery models to support and give effect to transfer of housing and infrastructure programs and services to Indigenous-led organizations. Indigenous control over design and delivery is key to building strong and resilient organizations. ISC will continue to collaborate with Indigenous partners to develop rigorous processes for supporting new program approaches with a view to self-determination through reliable and sustainable infrastructure.

Key risks

One of the key risks to the achievement of ISC's governance and community development objectives is the risk that momentum and progress on governance efforts may not be sustained due to the impacts of the current pandemic context. The current global shortage for supplies, equipment and capacity, compounded with the pandemic measures in place, may cause additional delays to the implementation of various infrastructure projects and might have a significant impact on forecasted costs. Restrictions on travel and community closures may lead to delays in land management decision-making processes. Such delays risk hindering not only land management but also project implementation, service delivery and First Nations' economic and infrastructure development (including post-COVID recovery initiatives). The department's ability to clearly identify communities' needs and prioritize resources accordingly (including project monitoring and compliance) is strongly dependent on community access and site visits.

Further, there is a risk that Indigenous businesses' recovery may be delayed if support funding is not allocated in a timely manner. Indigenous communities' recovery may also be impacted by application fatigue given the number of programs through which they have to apply to receive funding. ISC will continue to take measures to mitigate these risks, such as ensuring financial flexibility in order to allocate funds to the most pressing issues, especially in the context of the pandemic, and developing processes to improve opportunities for Indigenous businesses' recovery.

There is also a risk that there will not be predictable, sustainable and sufficient funding to support infrastructure needs for schools, housing and other community infrastructure. This would significantly limit the department's ability to meet emerging needs in First Nation communities for these assets and could impact the longevity of existing infrastructure assets.

The department will take all possible measures to monitor, assess, prevent, mitigate and respond to these risks as needed throughout 2021–22.

Planned results for Governance and Community Development

Departmental result Departmental result indicator Target Date to achieve target 2017–18
actual result
2018–19
actual result
2019–20
actual result
Indigenous communities advance their governance capacity % of First Nations with a completed community-led plan 48%a March 2024 Not applicable Not applicable 37%
Indigenous Peoples have reliable and sustainable infrastructure # of long-term drinking water advisories affecting public water systems on reserve 0 Has not been setb 69 59 61
% of First Nations housing that is adequate as assessed and reported by First Nationsc 75% March 2022 75% 75% 72.70%
% of First Nations schools with a condition rating of "good" or "new" 60%d March 2025 59% 60% 59%
% of First Nations health facilities with a condition rating of "good" 70% March 2022 Not applicable Not applicable 87%
# of First Nations communities located on reserves that rely on ISC funded diesel for electricity generation 24 March 2025 Not applicable Not applicable 38
% of long-term evacuees who have returned home or have a scheduled date within two years after their evacuation 90%e March 2022 Not applicablef 95.40% 82.70%
Land and resources in Indigenous communities are sustainable managed % of First Nations with community-led Land use plans 27% March 2022 Not applicableg 23.60%g 24%
% of First Nation communities with adequate solid waste management systems 37%h March 2022 Not applicableg 12%g 23%
% of high risk contaminated sites on reserve where clean-up or containment is occurring to reduce risk 41%i March 2022 Not applicableg 23.60%g 41%
Indigenous communities build economic prosperity % increase of Indigenous businesses created and/or expandedj 2% March 2022 1,277g 1,229g 1,156
% of First Nation communities where non-government revenues represent 25% or more of total revenues 18% March 2022 Not applicableg 13%g Not availablek
  • a  The target for 2021–22 has been updated from 35% to 48% based on an analysis of data collected to date in 2020–21. This target was set in consideration of the reported impact COVID-19 has had on intended community-led planning activities. It was also set in consideration of the many regions that, in recognition of the strong planning capacity built through the community-led planning processes, many Indigenous communities have reallocated Community Planners/Navigators to aid in their pandemic response.
  • b  The Government of Canada continues to work in partnership with communities and remains committed to ending all long-term drinking water advisories on public systems on reserve as soon as possible. Initiatives are underway to address all remaining long-term drinking water advisories on public systems on reserve. A new date to achieve the target has not been set. ISC continues to actively work with First Nations to address drinking water issues, including by assessing timelines, estimating appropriate target dates, and advancing projects in a way that respects public health measures.
  • c  This indicator measures outcomes of housing assessments reported as adequate on an annual basis. The annual result is based on finalized data from the previous fiscal year. The result for 2020–21 will be reported by First Nations communities in early 2021 through the Community Infrastructure and Housing Annual Report.
  • d  The target has been revised from 65% to 60% to reflect a new methodology. Previously, all schools were captured including schools not supported by the Education Infrastructure Program. The methodology has been revised to only capture ISC-supported schools. The new target also takes into account the sunsetting of the Education Infrastructure Program in 2021, and consideration of the COVID-19 impacts where construction sites have either closed or slowed down, delaying a number of projects and increasing their overall delivery costs.
  • e  The target has been revised from 100% to 90%. The percentage reflects a combination of variables that impact the repatriation date, such as timeframes for house repairs/replacement events or COVID-19 delays. In cases without a repatriation date, the majority of evacuees will be repatriated within two years. Of note, First Nations experienced over 8 times less long-term evacuees in 2019–20 than the last five-year average. Throughout 2019–20, there were a total of 70 long term evacuees with no scheduled return home date, including previous long-term and new evacuees from 2019–20.
  • f  This was a new indicator introduced in 2019–20, however data was available to provide a result for the 2018–19 fiscal year.
  • g  This indicator was transferred to ISC in 2019 as per Order in Council P.C. 2019-1109. Previous results were reported by CIRNAC.
  • h  The target was revised from 35% to 37% based on anticipated program funding for 2021–22.
  • i  The target was revised from 29% to 41% based on anticipated program funding from 2020 to 2025.
  • j  This indicator was reframed in 2021–22 to measure the percentage increase of businesses created and/or expanded. It previously measured the number of business created and/or expanded. Providing support for Indigenous business development is demand driven and fluctuates from year to year. Although the overall growth in Indigenous business development over multiple years is positive, there may be decreases in any given year. This year will be significantly impacted by the pandemic-related restrictions.
  • k  Results are based on previous year data. Results for 2019–20 will be available March 2021.
Planned budgetary financial resources for Governance and Community Development
2021–22
budgetary spending (as indicated in Main Estimates)
2021–22
planned spending
2022–23
planned spending
2023–24
planned spending
3,069,685,325 3,069,685,325 2,047,057,448 2,055,966,428
Planned human resources for Governance and Community Development
2021–22
planned full-time equivalents
2022–23
planned full-time equivalents
2023–24
planned full-time equivalents
1,410 1,273 1,252

Financial, human resources and performance information for the Indigenous Services Canada's program inventory is available in the GC InfoBase.

Indigenous Self-Determined Services

Description

These services are designed and delivered by Indigenous Peoples for Indigenous Peoples. They include services for which the control, authority and/or jurisdiction has been formally transferred to Indigenous communities or organizations, as supported through departmental funding.

Planning highlights

To achieve progress in this area, ISC will focus on two departmental results.

1. Indigenous Peoples control the design, delivery and management of services

ISC's ultimate goal is to transfer the control of high-quality services to Indigenous Peoples so that the department itself is no longer needed. That goal is firmly entrenched in the department's enabling legislation, the Department of Indigenous Services Act, and is woven through its mandate and all of its programs, services and partnerships.

Enhancing Indigenous control over the design and delivery of services is critical to realizing a future with fully equal, nation-to-nation, Inuit-to-Crown, and government-to-government relationships where Indigenous communities are self-determining, empowered nations. With that goal in mind, ISC remains committed to supporting Indigenous communities by building a new fiscal relationship with First Nations that is forward-looking, long-term, reliable, flexible and predictable. ISC will continue to implement the 10-year grant, which has been co-developed with First Nations partners like the AFN and the First Nations Financial Management Board (FMB), in order to provide greater long-term financial flexibility and predictability. The department expects to provide 115 grants to eligible First Nations by March 2022, and will continue to work with the FMB to ensure that First Nations remain eligible for the grant, as well as to include Indigenous Peoples in the research, co-development and implementation processes.

The department will also continue to collaborate with Indigenous partners to further co-develop the transfer payment policy and governance program reforms. ISC plans to coordinate a departmental response to the interim recommendations of the AFN-ISC Joint Advisory Committee on Fiscal Relations to further advance the new fiscal relationship. ISC is also working to co-develop a mutual accountability framework with First Nations that replaces the Default Prevention and Management Policy with a new, proactive approach that supports capacity development. Additionally, the department will continue to work with Indigenous leaders to finalize and develop baseline indicators for a National Outcome-Based Framework to comprehensively measure and track the closure of socio-economic gaps.

2. Indigenous self-determined services are improving outcomes for communities

In 2021–22, self-determined services will continue to provide greater flexibility for Indigenous Peoples to address specific local needs in their communities. By extension, addressing specific local needs will close socio-economic gaps, improve the quality of life in Indigenous communities, and encourage the realization of self-governing nations.

Data governance is an important part of measuring and tracking outcomes of specific programs and initiatives in Indigenous communities. As part of the broad data governance context, ISC will continue to work closely with Indigenous partners and institutions to help them build the data governance and data management capacity they will need to measure and build their path towards complete self-determination. ISC will provide support toward four key data initiatives, including co-development of a mutual accountability framework, the National Outcome-Based Framework, as well as co-development of baseline indicators to measure and track the closure of socio-economic gaps.

Further, the department will continue to collaborate with stakeholders and Indigenous partners on data innovation and data partnership activities in order to take a comprehensive approach to measuring the closure of socio-economic gaps. This work will include setting up distinction-based group tables on data to work collaboratively on the measurement of gaps. In addition, the department will work closely with Indigenous partners to address data gaps in longstanding departmental outcome measures such as the Community Well-Being Index, while exploring opportunities to ensure that the specific local data needs of different communities are recognized.

In 2021–22, ISC will continue to support the co-development of the First Nations Housing Strategy and related approaches to ensure its successful implementation. The department will continue to advance the transfer of housing and infrastructure programs and services to Indigenous institutions in a way that delivers improved, distinctions-based outcomes from the ground up.

In addition, ISC will continue to advance key health transformation efforts in Quebec, Ontario, Saskatchewan, Nova Scotia and northern Manitoba that are expected to increase and improve regional capacity for health governance. The department will continue to work with partners in other parts of the country to identify regional and sub-regional opportunities for increasing Indigenous control over health services. In British Columbia, ISC will continue to support British Columbia's First Nation Health Authority to deliver self-determined health services to nearly all First Nations communities in the province.

With regard to long-term continuum of care engagement, the 2018 Report of the Standing Committee on Indigenous and Northern Affairs outlined many gaps in the continuum of care in First Nations communities. Following that report, Budget 2019 announced $8.5 million to co-develop a new and more holistic long-term care strategy with First Nations and Inuit partners. In 2021–22, ISC will help the AFN and ITK to implement an Indigenous-led engagement process to address and resolve gaps in long-term care services. The engagement process will be designed to ensure that Indigenous leaders control the management of high quality long-term care services in circumstances tailored to their unique communities' needs.

ISC will also continue to co-develop and implement regional education agreements and other Indigenous-led education models that respond to the education goals and priorities set by First Nations, advancing Indigenous control over self-determined education services. These agreements identify Indigenous-controlled education strategies and allow the Government of Canada to support Indigenous schools and communities in the way that Indigenous leaders see fit, while ensuring that Indigenous students receive a high-quality, linguistically- and culturally- appropriate education. The department will continue to work through established Permanent Bilateral Mechanisms with First Nations, Inuit and Métis Nations to identify joint education priorities, as well as co-develop policies, programs and services options and monitor their progress.

Gender-based analysis plus

ISC will continue to rely on practices rooted in the co-developed principles of mutual accountability, including the co-development of a National Outcome-Based Framework, which should allow for gender-disaggregated analysis at the national level. ISC will co-develop approaches to address gender considerations in reporting with linkages to the United Nations SDGs, including by identifying and taking steps to address data gaps. For example, ISC is reviewing the Institute of Fiscal Studies and Democracy's (IFSD) Phase 2 report, "Funding First Nations child and family services (FNCFS): A performance budget approach to well-being", and its proposed 75 "Measuring to Thrive" indicators for First Nations children on reserve.

Results-Based Innovation

ISC will continue to achieve results-based innovation by working with Indigenous partners on new and progressive approaches, including gamification, user-centred design, co-development and open policy making to improve services and support Indigenous Peoples to independently determine and deliver high-quality services. The department will use its Results-Based Innovation Network, which includes members across all sectors at ISC and external partners with expertise in Indigenous innovation, as a key driver in results-based innovation and integrate innovation through its programs. This network promotes results-based innovation by:

  • providing a space for employees and partners to identify and prioritize innovation opportunities;
  • encouraging discussions of best practices;
  • providing sectors with mentorship and partner-engagement resources; and
  • educating members on what results-based innovation means in the Indigenous services context.

Key risks

While the department is committed to advancing self-determined services for Indigenous Peoples, the lack of appropriate capacity and infrastructure is a crucial concern that many Indigenous communities share.

Further, a significant risk is that the vision to move toward self-determination may not be supported by non-Indigenous Canadians. There is a risk that the impetus and efforts for self-determination may be too closely dependent on the current political climate.

In addition, the inability to quantify and measure progress toward self-determination due to the gaps in shared results and data may lead to program resources being allocated to larger or more organized communities capable of demonstrating more success, instead of smaller communities where the impact could be greater.

The department will take all possible measures to monitor, assess, prevent, mitigate and respond to these risks as needed throughout 2021–22.

Planned results for Indigenous Self-Determined Services

Departmental result Departmental result indicator Target Date to achieve target 2017–18
actual result
2018–19
actual result
2019–20
actual result
Indigenous Peoples control the design, delivery and management of services # of eligible First Nations communities that have opted in to a grant to support the new fiscal relationship 115a March 2022 Not applicableb Not applicableb 85
# of First Nations communities that have opted in to a self-determined service agreement To be established by March 2021c To be established by March 2021c Not applicableb Not applicableb 240
Indigenous self-determined services are improving outcomes for communities Average Community Well-Being index score for First Nations communities in a New Fiscal Relationship funding agreement To be established with partnersc To be established with partnersd Not applicableb Not applicableb Not applicableb
Average Community Well-Being (education score) for First Nations communities in a self-determined services agreement To be established with partners by March 2022c To be established with partners by March 2023c Not applicablee Not applicablee Not applicablee
% of British Columbia First Nations adults reporting that their health is excellent or very good 50% March 2028 33%f 33%f 33%f
% of First Nations communities with access to mental wellness team services Not applicableg Not applicableg Not applicable Not applicable Not applicable
% of residents living on reserve who are supported through Income Assistance Not applicableg Not applicableg Not applicable Not applicable Not applicable
% of First Nations on reserve students who graduate from secondary school Not applicableg Not applicableg Not applicable Not applicable Not applicable
% of First Nation housing that is adequate as assessed and reported by First Nations Not applicableg Not applicableg Not applicable Not applicable Not applicable
  • a  This target includes the 110 First Nations who have signed grant agreements as of December 1, 2020, and is based on preliminary analysis of an anticipated 5 new grant agreements being signed by eligible First Nations effective April 1, 2021.
  • b  This was a new indicator introduced in 2019–20.
  • c  Target to be established with partners when sufficient data becomes available. In the meantime, ISC will aim to achieve an increase.
  • d  The establishment of targets is not relevant within the context of self-determined services whereby First Nations have the flexibility to design and deliver services based on their own plans and priorities.
  • e  This was a new indicator introduced in 2020–21.
  • f  Data is based on survey results with a five-year cycle. Last available data for First Nations (on reserve) is from the 2015–16 Regional Health Survey.
  • g  These program level indicators were introduced in 2020–21 to report on annual results of First Nations communities that have opted in to a grant to support the new fiscal relationship. However, in the context of self-determined services such as the grant, whereby First Nations have the flexibility to design and delivery services based on their own plans and priorities, the establishment of targets at the program level for grant recipients would not be meaningful or relevant. The department will continue to work with First Nation partners to develop meaningful indicators for both parties that better reflect self-determined services moving forward. The results for these indicators will be reported in the 2020–21 ISC Departmental Results Report.
Planned budgetary financial resources for Indigenous Self-Determined Services
2021–22
budgetary spending (as indicated in Main Estimates)
2021–22
planned spending
2022–23
planned spending
2023–24
planned spending
2,422,137,941 2,422,137,941 2,464,294,624 1,871,224,919
Planned human resources for Indigenous Self-Determined Services
2021–22
planned full-time equivalents
2022–23
planned full-time equivalents
2023–24
planned full-time equivalents
7 0 0
The variance in FTEs for 2022–23 and 2023–24 is mainly due to the sunset of funding for the New Fiscal Relationship secretariat in 2021–22.

Financial, human resources and performance information for the Indigenous Services Canada's program inventory is available in the GC InfoBase.

United Nations' 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development and the UN Sustainable Development Goals

In September 2015, Canada joined 192 United Nations (UN) Member States and adopted the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development. The UN 2030 Agenda is a global framework of action that integrates social, economic, and environmental dimensions of sustainable development, as well as peace, governance, and justice elements. In addition to supporting Environment and Climate Change Canada with the development of the Federal Sustainable Development Strategy, ISC also collaborates with Employment and Social Development Canada and the Treasury Board of Canada Secretariat in the advancement of the UN 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development.

ISC will continue to advance the UN Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) across all of its core responsibilities, programs and services, working collaboratively with partners to improve access to high quality services for First Nations, Inuit and Métis. The department's vision of supporting and empowering Indigenous Peoples to independently deliver high quality services aligns closely with the social, economic and environmental pillars of sustainable development. Bearing in mind the overarching goal of "no one left behind" set out in the UN Agenda 2030, the department is committed in the Indigenous context to addressing the root causes of poverty and helping Indigenous Peoples improve socio-economic conditions in their communities.

In 2021–22, ISC will lead SDG 6 on clean water and sanitation. The work being done with the AFN advancing First Nation-led engagements and options on safe drinking water legislation and informing the co-development of the long-term water and wastewater strategy is in line with GBA+ principles. This will lead to reliable and sustainable infrastructure that supports the well-being of Indigenous Peoples by closing gaps between Indigenous and non-Indigenous communities in terms of equal access to quality water.

As of September 30, 2020, more than $1.74 billion of targeted funds has been invested to support 657 water and wastewater projects in 581 First Nations communities, serving approximately 462,000 people. The 2020 Fall Economic Update announced over $1.5 billion in additional investments, starting in 2021, to help accelerate the work being done to end all long-term drinking water advisories on public systems on reserves, to better support the operation and maintenance of systems, and to continue program investments in water and wastewater assets.

Internal Services: planned results

Description

Internal Services are those groups of related activities and resources that the federal government considers to be services in support of Programs and/or required to meet corporate obligations of an organization. Internal Services refers to the activities and resources of the 10 distinct services that support Program delivery in the organization, regardless of the Internal Services delivery model in a department. These services are:

  • Management and Oversight Services
  • Communications Services
  • Legal Services
  • Human Resources Management Services
  • Financial Management Services
  • Information Management Services
  • Information Technology Services
  • Real Property Management Services
  • Materiel Management Services
  • Acquisition Management Services

Planning highlights:

In 2021–22, ISC will continue to support its programs and planned activities by:

  • continuing to promote and increase Indigenous recruitment, development and retention in employment at all levels. In particular, the department will focus on recruiting and retaining Indigenous students and developing Indigenous employees for leadership positions within the federal public service;
  • continuing implementation of the Indigenous Cultural Competency Learning Policy (implemented in 2020–21), helping staff better perform their functions, and contribute to building a culturally safe environment for Indigenous Peoples;
  • continuing to work collaboratively with partners to provide First Nations, Inuit and Métis communities with timely and relevant information they need to access high quality services. This will be accomplished through a variety of digital and traditional communication methods to support Indigenous communities in responding to the COVID-19 pandemic and local emergencies, address anti-Indigenous racism in health care, and communicate about Jordan's Principle, health and social services, and child and family services;
  • maintaining and providing the INSTAT (Indigenous and Northern Statistics) service, which is the main point of contact within the department for authoritative demographic and socio-economic information. This service will be used to promote greater accountability, transparency and oversight, strengthen ISC's Corporate Risk profile, ensure oversight of plans, decisions and results, and conduct internal audits and financial reviews to maximize the efficiency and effectiveness of human and financial resources;
  • optimizing service delivery through an improved digital by design approach and the departmental data strategy; strengthening governance around security issues, emergency management issues and decision making; providing employees and stakeholders with the tools and technology they need to do their jobs effectively; and providing access services, particularly in the context of the COVID-19 pandemic;
  • ensuring that real property is managed in a sustainable and financially responsible manner throughout its life cycle. Through strengthened procurement policies in support of the Procurement Strategy for Aboriginal Business, ISC will maximize the participation of and benefit to Indigenous Peoples, businesses and communities as part of reconciliation between Indigenous people and non-Indigenous Canadians. The department will continue to implement measures to meet the requirements of the Directive on Government Contracts, including real property leases in the Nunavut Settlement Area to provide reasonable support and assistance to Inuit firms in order to enable them to compete for government contracts;
  • implementing a National Workplace Strategy in support of priorities for workplace modernization, integrating environmental initiatives, incorporating Indigenous culture, diversity and inclusion, and improving employee well-being and work experience;
  • offering robust, timely, and meaningful evidence to help shape and support the re-design of the departments' policies and programs, and to inform and influence improved service delivery and the transfer of services to Indigenous partners; and
  • continuing to strengthen its approach to results-based management. The results and indicators found in this report are unchanged from the previous year in anticipation of more substantive changes in 2022–23, which will consider contextual factors such as new mandate letter commitments, ISC enabling legislation, ISC strategic plan, UNDRIP and co-development with Indigenous partners. A strengthened results-based management approach will include the integration of results, resources and risks into business planning for informed decision-making and reporting. This will ensure that Parliamentarians and Canadians receive transparent, clear and useful information on the results achieved and the resources used to do so.
Planned budgetary financial resources for Internal Services
2021–22
budgetary spending (as indicated in Main Estimates)
2021–22
planned spending
2022–23
planned spending
2023–24
planned spending
169,788,003 169,788,003 158,528,769 152,222,407
Planned human resources for Internal Services
2021–22
planned full-time equivalents
2022–23
planned full-time equivalents
2023–24
planned full-time equivalents
1,400 1,315 1,307

Spending and human resources

This section provides an overview of the department's planned spending and human resources for the next three consecutive fiscal years and compares planned spending for the upcoming year with the current and previous years' actual spending.

Planned spending

Departmental spending 2018–19 to 2023–24

The following graph presents planned (voted and statutory) spending over time.

Text alternative for Departmental spending 2018–19 to 2023–24

This stacked bar graph depicts actual spending from 2018 to 2021, forecast spending from 2020 to 2021, and planned spending from 2021 to 2024:

  • In 2018–19, total actual spending was $11,587 million. Of this amount, $11,506 million is voted spending and $81 million is statutory spending.
  • In 2019–20, total actual spending was $13,275 million. Of this amount, $13,139 million is voted spending and $136 million is statutory spending.
  • In 2020–21, total forecast spending was $17,774 million. Of this amount, $16,017 million is voted spending and $1,758 million is statutory spending.
  • In 2021–22, total planned spending is $13,506 million. Of this amount, $13,385 million is voted spending and $121 million is statutory spending.
  • In 2022–23, total planned spending is $12,064 million. Of this amount, $11,949 million is voted spending and $115 million is statutory spending.
  • In 2023–24, total planned spending is $11,937 million. Of this amount, $11,819 million is coted spending and $119 million is statutory spending.

Due to rounding, figures may not add to totals shown.

Budgetary planning summary for core responsibilities and Internal Services (dollars)

The following table shows actual, forecast and planned spending for each of Indigenous Services Canada's core responsibilities and to Internal Services for the years relevant to the current planning year.

Core responsibilities and Internal Services 2018–19
expenditures*
2019–20
expenditures
2020–21
forecast spending
2021–22
budgetary spending (as indicated in Main Estimates)
2021–22
planned spending
2022–23
planned spending
2023–24
planned spending
Services and Benefits to Individuals 1,678,872,561 1,865,336,041 2,545,388,614 2,006,677,872 2,006,677,872 1,996,581,074 2,223,103,661
Health and Social Services 6,208,068,152 6,562,978,810 8,481,904,932 5,837,808,255 5,837,808,255 5,397,624,340 5,634,901,559
Governance and Community Development Services 3,062,438,396 3,328,800,660 4,892,273,961 3,069,685,325 3,069,685,325 2,047,057,448 2,055,966,428
Indigenous Self-Determined Services 491,076,435 1,297,567,333 1,631,192,619 2,422,137,941 2,422,137,941 2,464,294,624 1,871,224,919
Subtotal 11,440,455,544 13,054,682,844 17,550,760,126 13,336,309,393 13,336,309,393 11,905,557,486 11,785,196,567
Internal Services 146,561,915 219,866,093 223,517,863 169,788,003 169,788,003 158,528,769 152,222,407
Total 11,587,017,459 13,274,548,937 17,774,277,989 13,506,097,396 13,506,097,396 12,064,086,255 11,937,418,974
*  The 2018–19 expenditures have been reinstated to reflect the 2019–20 Departmental Results Framework.

The 2019–20 expenditures were $13,274.5 million, a net increase of approximately $1,687.5 million over 2018–19. This is primarily due to:

  • an increase in funding related to the transfer from CIRNAC primarily for the Individual Affairs Program, Lands and Economic Development Programs and internal services as per Order in Council P.C. 2019-1109;
  • a net increase in funding for the elementary and secondary as well as post-secondary education programs;
  • a net increase in funding for Child and Family Services;
  • a net increase in funding for health, social and education services and support for First Nations children under Jordan's Principle and for supporting Inuit children through the Inuit Child First Initiative; and
  • a net increase in funding for the non-insured health benefits for First Nations and Inuit.

Spending is expected to increase by $4,499.7 million between 2019–20 expenditures and 2020–21 forecast spending. This is primarily due to:

  • an increase in funding related to COVID-19 initiatives, such as:
    • Indigenous Community Support Fund;
    • enhancing public health measures to COVID-19 in First Nations and Inuit communities;
    • Income Assistance;
    • supporting Indigenous businesses;
    • supporting a safe restart in Indigenous communities;
    • supporting students and youth impacted by COVID-19; and
    • supporting Indigenous mental wellness.
  • a net increase in funding for Child and Family Services.

Spending is expected to decrease by $4,268.2 million between 2020–21 forecast spending and 2021–22 planned spending. This is primarily due to:

  • a sunset (at the end of 2021–22) of funding for COVID-19 initiatives; and
  • a net decrease in funding for Child and Family Services.

Spending is expected to decrease by $1,568.7 million between 2021–22 and 2023–24 planned spending. This is primarily due to:

  • a net decrease in funding to improve access to safe, clean drinking water in First Nation communities. The program funding for water and wastewater infrastructure and for environmental public health services as well as for the acceleration of measures to lift all long-term drinking water advisories on public systems on reserve sunset at the end of 2021–22;
  • a net decrease in funding for health, social and education services and support for First Nations children under Jordan's Principle (sunsetting at the end of 2021–22) and for supporting Inuit children through the Inuit Child First Initiative;
  • a sunset (at the end of 2022–23) of funding to support the implementation of the British Columbia Tripartite Framework Agreement on First Nation Health Governance for the transfer to the First Nations Health Authority;
  • a sunset (at the end of 2021–22) of funding for supportive care and the continuation of public health responses in Indigenous communities (COVID-19);
  • a net decrease in funding for various other programs, such as Urban Programming for Indigenous Peoples, income assistance, infrastructure, and health programming;
  • a net increase in funding for the elementary and secondary as well as post-secondary education programs; and
  • a net increase in funding for the non-insured health benefits for First Nations and Inuit.

Decisions on the renewal of the sunset initiatives will be taken in future budgets and reflected in future estimates.

2021–22 Budgetary planned gross spending summary (dollars)

The following table reconciles gross planned spending with net planned spending for 2021–22.

Core responsibilities and Internal Services 2021–22
planned gross spending
2021–22
planned revenues netted against expenditures
2021–22
planned net spending
Services and Benefits to Individuals 2,058,428,838 (51,750,966) 2,006,677,872
Health and Social Services 5,838,125,420 (317,165) 5,837,808,255
Governance and Community Development Services 3,069,685,325 0 3,069,685,325
Indigenous Self-Determined Services 2,422,137,941 0 2,422,137,941
Subtotal 13,388,377,524 (52,068,131) 13,336,309,393
Internal Services 212,036,003 (42,248,000) 169,788,003
Total 13,600,413,527 (94,316,131) 13,506,097,396

Planned human resources

The following table shows actual, forecast and planned full-time equivalents (FTEs) for each core responsibility in Indigenous Services Canada's departmental results framework and to Internal Services for the years relevant to the current planning year.

Human resources planning summary for core responsibilities and Internal Services
Core responsibilities and Internal Services 2018–19
actual full‑time equivalents
2019–20
actual full‑time equivalents
2020–21
forecast full‑time equivalents
2021–22
planned full‑time equivalents
2022–23
planned full‑time equivalents
2023–24
planned full‑time equivalents
Services and Benefits to Individuals 1,142 1,528 1,732 1,553 1,536 1,396
Health and Social Services 1,391 1,460 1,569 1,538 1,318 1,400
Governance and Community Development Services 1,024 1,476 1,616 1,410 1,273 1,252
Indigenous Self-Determined Services 0 0 0 7 0 0
Subtotal 3,557 4,464 4,917 4,508 4,127 4,048
Internal Services 653 1,229 1,427 1,400 1,315 1,307
Total 4,210 5,693 6,344 5,908 5,442 5,355

The decreases in FTEs from 2021–22 to 2023–24 are primarily due to:

  • the sunset of funding related to address sex-based inequities in Indian status registration and funding to address sex-based inequities in Indian status resolved by the removal of the 1951 cut-off;
  • a net decrease in 2022–23 due to the sunset of First Nation funding and sunset of First Nations Water and Wastewater Enhanced program funding;
  • a decrease of funding under Governance and Community Development Services to improve access to safe, clean drinking water in First Nation communities. The program funding for water and wastewater infrastructure and for the acceleration of measures to lift all long-term drinking water advisories on public systems on reserve sunset at the end of 2021–22; and
  • the sunset of funds in 2021–22 for the New Fiscal Relationship secretariat.

Estimates by vote

Information on the Indigenous Services Canada's organizational appropriations is available in the 2021–22 Main Estimates.

Future-oriented Condensed statement of operations

The future‑oriented condensed statement of operations provides an overview of the Indigenous Services Canada's operations for 2020–21 to 2021–22.

The amounts for forecast and planned results in this statement of operations were prepared on an accrual basis. The amounts for forecast and planned spending presented in other sections of the Departmental Plan were prepared on an expenditure basis. Amounts may therefore differ.

A more detailed future‑oriented statement of operations and associated notes, including a reconciliation of the net cost of operations to the requested authorities, are available on the Indigenous Services Canada's website.

Future‑oriented Condensed statement of operations for the year ending March 31, 2022 (dollars)
Financial information 2020–21
forecast results
2021–22
planned results
Difference (2021–22 planned results minus 2020–21 forecast results)
Total expenses 18,011,533,485 13,613,759,445 (4,397,774,040)
Total revenues 230,358,953 94,316,131 (136,042,822)
Net cost of operations before government funding and transfers 17,781,174,532 13,519,443,314 (4,261,731,218)

Expenses

Total expenses for 2021–22 are planned at $13,614 million, representing a $4,398 million decrease from the previous year's forecasted total expenses of $18,012 million. Expenses by core responsibility are as follows:

  • Health and Social Services $5,831 million (43%);
  • Governance and Community Development $3,031 million (22%);
  • Indigenous Self-determined Service $2,422 million (18%); and
  • Service and Benefits to Individuals $2,098 million (15%).

The remainder of the total expenses includes Internal Services in the amount of $232 million (2%). The majority of the decrease in expenditures from 2020–21 to 2021–22 represents funding from the COVID-19 pandemic which is not included in the planned results for 2021–22.

Revenues

Total revenues for 2021–22 are planned at $94 million, representing a $136 million decrease over the previous year's total revenues of $230 million. Respendable revenues represent $46 million (49% of total revenues) and revenues from the provision of financial and administrative services represent $42 million (45% of total revenues).

Corporate information

Organizational profile

Appropriate minister: The Honourable Marc Miller

Institutional head: Christiane Fox

Ministerial portfolio: Department of Indigenous Services

Enabling instrument: Department of Indigenous Services Act, S.C. 2019, c. 29, s. 336.

Year of incorporation / commencement: 2019

Special operating agency: Indian Oil and Gas Canada

 

Adjudicative and advisory bodies: National Indigenous Economic Development Board

Raison d'être, mandate and role: who we are and what we do

"Raison d'être, mandate and role: who we are and what we do" is available on the Indigenous Services Canada's website.

For more information on the department's organizational mandate letter commitments, see the mandate letter and supplementary mandate letter for the Honourable Marc Miller.

Operating context

Information on the operating context is available on the Indigenous Services Canada's website.

Reporting framework

The Indigenous Services Canada approved departmental results framework and program inventory for 2020–21 are as follows.

Core Responsibility 1: Services and Benefits to Individuals

These services and benefits are mainly delivered directly to Indigenous Peoples by the Department. They include, among other services and benefits, individual First Nations and Inuit clinical care and health-related benefits such as pharmacy, dental and vision care. The Department is also responsible for determining individuals' entitlement to Indian registration and for the issuance of various proofs of registration, including the Secure Certificate of Indian Status (SCIS), which can be used to access various programs and services.

Departmental Results Indicators Program Inventory
Quality and timely services are delivered directly to Indigenous people Percentage of First Nations adults who rate the quality of health care services delivered in their community as good or excellent
  • Supplementary Health Benefits
  • Clinical and Client Care
  • Community Oral Health Services
  • Individual Affairs
Percentage of prior approval requests for medication coverage completed within 24 hours
Percentage of eligible First Nations and Inuit who received at least one non-insured health benefit in a year
Percentage of eligible applicants issued a Secure Certificate of Indian Status within 16 weeks from the application date
Health services delivered to Indigenous people contribute to improved health outcomes Percentage of First Nations and Inuit adults who reported being in very good or excellent health

Core Responsibility 2: Health and Social Services

These services are primarily delivered in partnership with Indigenous communities and organizations, provinces/territories and agencies. Together, they focus on health and well-being for Indigenous people. They include health services to strengthen Indigenous communities in areas such as healthy living, communicable disease control, healthy child development and community care. They also include social services with an emphasis on children and families, as well as education services from kindergarten to post-secondary.

Departmental Results Indicators Program Inventory
Indigenous Peoples and communities are healthier Active tuberculosis incidence rate among Inuit living in Inuit Nunangat
  • Jordan's Principle
  • Mental Wellness
  • Healthy Living
  • Healthy Child Development
  • Home and Community Care
  • Health Human Resources
  • Environmental Public Health
  • Communicable Disease Control and Management
  • Education
  • Income Assistance
  • Assisted Living
  • First Nations Child and Family Services
  • Family Violence Prevention
  • Urban Programming for Indigenous Peoples
Active tuberculosis incidence rate among First Nations on reserve
Rate of newly reported cases of HIV among First Nations
Percentage of First Nations adults with diabetes accessing newer, novel medications and not on insulin
Indigenous Peoples receive social services that respond to community needs Percentage of First Nations and Inuit communities with access to mental wellness team services
Percentage of First Nations communities offering family support services aimed at keeping families together
Percentage of First Nations children on reserve in care
Percentage of residents living on reserve who are supported through Income Assistance
Number of individuals who received services under Urban Programming for Indigenous Peoples
Indigenous students receive an inclusive and quality education Number of First Nations students who are provided full-day kindergarten services in First Nations administered schools
Percentage of students attending First Nations administered schools who are taught at least one subject in a First Nations language
Percentage of First Nations on reserve students who graduate from secondary school
Number of funded First Nations, Inuit and Métis students who graduate with a post-secondary degree/diploma/certificate

Core Responsibility 3: Governance and Community Development Services

These services are commonly delivered in partnership with Indigenous communities and institutions and are focused on strong community governance and physical foundations. They include supports for governance capacity in areas such as community planning and financial management. They also include support for investments in community infrastructure, land and resource management, and economic development.

Departmental Results Indicators Program Inventory
Indigenous communities advance their governance capacity Percentage of First Nations with a completed community-led plan
  • Health Facilities
  • e-Health Infostructure
  • Health Planning, Quality Management and Systems Integration
  • Indigenous Governance and Capacity
  • Water and Wastewater
  • Education Facilities
  • Housing
  • Other Community Infrastructure and Activities
  • Emergency Management Assistance
  • Indigenous Entrepreneurship and Business Development
  • Economic Development Capacity and Readiness
  • Land, Natural Resources and Environmental Management
  • Statutory, Legislative and Policy Support to First Nations Governance
Indigenous Peoples have reliable and sustainable infrastructure Number of long-term drinking water advisories affecting public water systems on reserve
Percentage of First Nations housing that is adequate as assessed and reported by First Nations
Percentage of First Nations schools with a condition rating of "good" or "new"
Percentage of First Nations health facilities with a condition rating of "good"
Number of First Nations communities located on reserves that rely on Indigenous Services Canada funded diesel for electricity generation
Percentage of long-term evacuees who have returned home or have a scheduled date within two years after their evacuation
Land and resources in Indigenous communities are sustainably managed Percentage of First Nations with community-led Land Use Plans
Percentage of First Nations communities with adequate solid waste management systems
Percentage high risk contaminated sites on reserve where clean-up or containment is occurring to reduce risk
Indigenous communities build economic prosperity Percentage increase of Indigenous businesses created and/or expanded
Percentage of First Nations communities where non-federal government revenues represent 25% or more of total revenues

Core Responsibility 4: Indigenous Self-Determined Services

These services are designed and delivered by Indigenous people for Indigenous Peoples. They include services for which the control, authority and/or jurisdiction has been formally transferred to Indigenous communities or organizations, as supported through departmental funding.

Departmental Results Indicators Program Inventory
Indigenous Peoples control the design, delivery and management of services Number of eligible First Nations communities that have opted in to a grant to support the new fiscal relationship
  • New Fiscal Relationship
  • Self-Determined Services
  • British-Columbia Tripartite Health Governance
Number of First Nations communities that have opted in to a self-determined service agreement
Indigenous self-determined services are improving outcomes for communities Average Community Well-Being index score for First Nations communities in a New Fiscal Relationship funding agreement
Average Community Well-Being (education score) for First Nations communities in a self-determined services agreement
Percentage of British Columbia First Nations adults reporting that their health is excellent or very good
Percentage of First Nations communities with access to mental wellness team services
Percentage of residents living on reserve who are supported through Income Assistance
Percentage of First Nations on reserve students who graduate from secondary school
Percentage of First Nations housing that is adequate as assessed and reported by First Nations

Supporting information on the program inventory

Supporting information on planned expenditures, human resources, and results related to the Indigenous Services Canada's program inventory is available in the GC InfoBase.

Supplementary information tables

The following supplementary information tables are available on the Indigenous Services Canada's website:

Federal tax expenditures

Indigenous Services Canada's Departmental Plan does not include information on tax expenditures that relate to its planned results for 2021–22.

Tax expenditures are the responsibility of the Minister of Finance, and the Department of Finance Canada publishes cost estimates and projections for government‑wide tax expenditures each year in the Report on Federal Tax Expenditures. This report provides detailed information on tax expenditures, including objectives, historical background and references to related federal spending programs, as well as evaluations, research papers and gender-based analysis. The tax measures presented in this report are solely the responsibility of the Minister of Finance.

Organizational contact information

Indigenous Services Canada
Les Terrasses de la Chaudière
10 Wellington Street, North Tower
Gatineau, Quebec
K1A 0H4
Internet: https://www.canada.ca/en/indigenous-services-canada.html
Email: aadnc.webmestre-webmaster.aandc@canada.ca

General and statistical inquiries and publication distribution
Telephone (toll-free): 1-800-567-9604
TTY (toll-free): 1-866-553-0554
Email: aadnc.infopubs.aandc@canada.ca

Departmental library
Telephone: 819-997-0811
Email: aadnc.reference.aandc@canada.ca

Media inquiries — Communications
Telephone: 819-953-1160
Email: SAC.media.ISC@canada.ca

Appendix: definitions

appropriation (crédit)

Any authority of Parliament to pay money out of the Consolidated Revenue Fund.

budgetary expenditures (dépenses budgétaires)

Operating and capital expenditures; transfer payments to other levels of government, organizations or individuals; and payments to Crown corporations.

core responsibility (responsabilité essentielle)

An enduring function or role performed by a department. The intentions of the department with respect to a core responsibility are reflected in one or more related departmental results that the department seeks to contribute to or influence.

Departmental Plan (plan ministériel)

A report on the plans and expected performance of a department over a 3‑year period. Departmental Plans are tabled in Parliament each spring.

departmental priority (priorité ministérielle)

A plan or project that a department has chosen to focus and report on during the planning period. Departmental priorities represent the things that are most important or what must be done first to support the achievement of the desired departmental results.

departmental result (résultat ministériel)

A consequence or outcome that a department seeks to achieve. A departmental result is often outside departments' immediate control, but it should be influenced by program-level outcomes.

departmental result indicator (indicateur de résultat ministériel)

A factor or variable that provides a valid and reliable means to measure or describe progress on a departmental result.

departmental results framework (cadre ministériel des résultats)

A framework that consists of the department's core responsibilities, departmental results and departmental result indicators.

Departmental Results Report (rapport sur les résultats ministériels)

A report on a department's actual accomplishments against the plans, priorities and expected results set out in the corresponding Departmental Plan.

experimentation (expérimentation)

The conducting of activities that seek to first explore, then test and compare, the effects and impacts of policies and interventions in order to inform evidence-based decision-making, and improve outcomes for Canadians, by learning what works and what doesn't. Experimentation is related to, but distinct form innovation (the trying of new things), because it involves a rigorous comparison of results. For example, using a new website to communicate with Canadians can be an innovation; systematically testing the new website against existing outreach tools or an old website to see which one leads to more engagement, is experimentation.

full‑time equivalent (équivalent temps plein)

A measure of the extent to which an employee represents a full person‑year charge against a departmental budget. Full‑time equivalents are calculated as a ratio of assigned hours of work to scheduled hours of work. Scheduled hours of work are set out in collective agreements.

gender-based analysis plus (GBA+) (analyse comparative entre les sexes plus [ACS+])

An analytical process used to assess how diverse groups of women, men and gender-diverse people experience policies, programs and services based on multiple factors including race, ethnicity, religion, age, and mental or physical disability.

government-wide priorities (priorités pangouvernementales)

For the purpose of the 2021–22 Departmental Plan, government-wide priorities refers to those high-level themes outlining the government's agenda in the 2020 Speech from the Throne, namely: Protecting Canadians from COVID-19; Helping Canadians through the pandemic; Building back better – a resiliency agenda for the middle class; The Canada we're fighting for.

horizontal initiative (initiative horizontale)

An initiative in which two or more federal organizations are given funding to pursue a shared outcome, often linked to a government priority.

non‑budgetary expenditures (dépenses non budgétaires)

Net outlays and receipts related to loans, investments and advances, which change the composition of the financial assets of the Government of Canada.

performance (rendement)

What an organization did with its resources to achieve its results, how well those results compare to what the organization intended to achieve, and how well lessons learned have been identified.

performance indicator (indicateur de rendement)

A qualitative or quantitative means of measuring an output or outcome, with the intention of gauging the performance of an organization, program, policy or initiative respecting expected results.

performance reporting (production de rapports sur le rendement)

The process of communicating evidence‑based performance information. Performance reporting supports decision-making, accountability and transparency.

plan (plan)

The articulation of strategic choices, which provides information on how an organization intends to achieve its priorities and associated results. Generally a plan will explain the logic behind the strategies chosen and tend to focus on actions that lead up to the expected result.

planned spending (dépenses prévues)

For Departmental Plans and Departmental Results Reports, planned spending refers to those amounts presented in the Main Estimates.

A department is expected to be aware of the authorities that it has sought and received. The determination of planned spending is a departmental responsibility, and departments must be able to defend the expenditure and accrual numbers presented in their Departmental Plans and Departmental Results Reports.

program (programme)

Individual or groups of services, activities or combinations thereof that are managed together within the department and focus on a specific set of outputs, outcomes or service levels.

program inventory (répertoire des programmes)

Identifies all of the department's programs and describes how resources are organized to contribute to the department's core responsibilities and results.

result (résultat)

An external consequence attributed, in part, to an organization, policy, program or initiative. Results are not within the control of a single organization, policy, program or initiative; instead they are within the area of the organization's influence.

statutory expenditures (dépenses législatives)

Expenditures that Parliament has approved through legislation other than appropriation acts. The legislation sets out the purpose of the expenditures and the terms and conditions under which they may be made.

strategic outcome (résultat stratégique)

A long-term and enduring benefit to Canadians that is linked to the organization's mandate, vision and core functions.

target (cible)

A measurable performance or success level that an organization, program or initiative plans to achieve within a specified time period. Targets can be either quantitative or qualitative.

voted expenditures (dépenses votées)

Expenditures that Parliament approves annually through an Appropriation Act. The vote wording becomes the governing conditions under which these expenditures may be made.

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