First Nations Environmental Contaminants Program for communities and organizations south of 60th parallel

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Important: New in this Call for proposal

This Call for proposals has been revised. Please read through it carefully for changes such as the funding stream, length of agreements, amounts of funding, etc.

The First Nations Environmental Contaminants Program (FNECP) is introducing a new experimental component in this 2023/2024 FNECP Call-for-Proposal (CFP).

The Baseline Assessment Proposal on the State of Health and the Environment (BAPHE) is a new component being funded in support of First Nations capacity to engage in the Impact Assessments process. Under this component, the FNECP will support proposals from First Nation communities that are interested in assessing the baseline health and environment status of their community prior to the implementation of planned large-scale industrial projects on their traditional territories, and when such projects may have potential impacts on the community.

For more information, please refer to the 2023/2024 First Nations Environmental Contaminants Program call for proposals.

Note: Applications to the 2023/2024 FNECP funding should clearly identify the component of the program they are applying to.

What is the First Nations Environmental Contaminants Program?

Indigenous Services Canada's First Nations Environmental Contaminants Program (FNECP) is helping First Nations improve their health and wellbeing by supporting their capacity to identify, investigate and characterize the potential impact of exposure to environmental hazards on their health and environment through community-based research, monitoring, risk assessment and risk communication.

Chemical monitoring and exposure assessments enable First Nations communities and First Nations organizations south of 60° parallel to gather timely and accurate information to identify and characterize human exposures to environmental hazards or to assess the baseline status of human health and the environment prior to the implementation of planned large-scale industrial projects on their traditional territories. This information provides First Nations leaders with an early indication of key contaminant concerns in their community, traditional territory or traditional lands across Canada, creating a foundation for risk mitigation actions.

For the 2023/2024 submission

Primary research proposals should:

Selected research proposals can receive up to $125,000 per project in funding over two years (April 2023 to March 2025).

Knowledge integration proposals

Secondary research that integrates existing scientific data and community-based knowledge sources on risk assessment and risk communication of chemical, biological and radiological exposure in First Nations communities may be supported. This funding stream can be used to support knowledge integration about an environmental public health issue or hazard of concern. In this scenario, this proposal could be submitted prior to and in preparation for submitting a primary research proposal in the next funding period, should the knowledge integration demonstrate the need.

Risk communication proposals

This funding stream can be used for extensive and sophisticated risk communication of the results of previously completed primary research to increase First Nations' awareness of the new knowledge and its implications for human health.

Selected knowledge integration and risk communication proposals can receive up to $25,000 per project in funding over one year (April 2023 to March 2024).

Baseline Assessment Proposals on the state of Health and the Environment (BAPHE).

This new component of the FNECP aims to strengthen First Nations' capacity to engage in the Impact Assessments process, and will support First Nations interested in assessing the baseline health and environment status of their community prior to the implementation of planned large-scale industrial projects on their traditional territories, when such projects may have potential health impacts on the community.

This program supports projects for the maximum length of two years.

Selected research proposals can receive up to $125,000 per project in funding over two-years (April 2023 to March 2025).

Important:

Who can apply for funding?

Important:

The FNECP program requires that:

The scientific/academic partner(s) must be identified in the proposal.

Note: First Nations in British Columbia should apply for funding under the First Nations Health Authority Environmental Contaminants Program. First Nations north of 60° parallel, Metis and Inuit communities/organizations should apply for funding under the Northern Contaminants Program. First Nations communities that are not recognized by the federal government are not eligible for the funding.

What are the areas of primary concern?

Chemical hazards

Below is the list of contaminants that are included as focus areas for the First Nations Environmental Contaminants Program. Other environmental contaminants of potential health concern to First Nations communities (not outlined here) may be a part of research projects under the FNECP if there is documented evidence or peer-reviewed literature of these substances being a hazard to human health:

Biological hazards specifically in traditional/country/local foods

Radiological Hazards

Radon – a radioactive, colourless, odourless gas occurring naturally as an indirect decay product of uranium or thorium.

Important: Primary research projects focusing on radon exposure assessment and monitoring should provide a letter of support from the Director of Housing supporting the project and expressing a commitment to request and provide funds for radon remediation in homes with radon levels exceeding the Health Canada radon guideline (200bq/m2).

Note: The FNECP program generally does not accept drinking water quality research proposals because drinking water quality is monitored systematically and on an ongoing basis in all First Nations communities by First Nations communities and Indigenous Services Canada. Only very novel and/or innovative state-of-the-art research project proposals that aim to contribute to the publishable body of knowledge, which cannot be achieved through the systematic surveillance, might be considered.

Baseline Assessment Proposals on the state of Health and the Environment (BAPHE)

This project should focus on the baseline assessment of human health in combination with environmental conditions (e.g., traditional foods, water, soil and air) in First Nations communities before any large scale projects are implemented in, or in areas surrounding their communities.

Below is a list of focus areas under this component:

How do I submit a proposal?

Please adhere to the following format:

Complete proposals (electronic or hard copy) must be received by Indigenous Services Canada no later than 11:59 pm Mountain Time, December 17, 2022

Proposals may be submitted electronically via email before this deadline. Alternatively, a hard-copy submission may be sent via Canada Post, courier, or fax. Please note that proposals that are submitted exclusively by courier or Canada Post must be postmarked by the submission deadline. Proposals arriving after the deadline will not be eligible for consideration.

Successful applicants will be notified of the funding decisions by March 15th, 2023.

Electronic submissions can be sent to:

fnecp-plcepn@sac-isc.gc.ca

Fax Submissions can be sent to 613-952-8639

Hard/paper-copy submissions can be sent to:

First Nations Environmental Contaminants Program
Environmental Public Health Division
Office of Population and Public Health
Population Health and Primary Care Directorate
First Nations and Inuit Health Branch
Indigenous Services Canada
A.L. 1919D
10 Wellington Street, Suite 1455,
Gatineau, QC, K1A 0H4

Important: The Funding Recipient shall provide the Minister with sixty (60) days to review any reports submitted under this Agreement which contain environmental analysis, findings or recommendations prior to any release of such reports, or disclosure of any of their findings, to the media or the public.

Who can I contact for more information?

For more information on the First Nations Environmental Contaminants Program, including funding eligibility and project ideas, or to submit a proposal, please contact fnecp-plcepn@sac-isc.gc.ca or call (613) 293-5517.

How are eligible proposals evaluated?

This program involves a competitive selection process. As a result, not all eligible proposals that meet mandatory criteria will receive funding.

Proposals that pass Mandatory Criteria Review (MCR) will move on to the Science Peer Review (SPR) followed by the Community-Based Merit Review (CBMR). Scores from both the SPR and CBMR will be tallied and the highest-ranking proposals will be funded up to the maximum of available program funding.

The following are the steps involved in the review process:

A) Mandatory criteria

Indigenous Services Canada's role is to assess the merit of the proposal against the criteria provided below. All criteria below must be met in order for proposals to move onto the next step in the evaluation process (e.g., Science Peer Review).

  • request for funding per proposal for a primary research project OR the baseline assessment of the state of the health and environment project (BAPHE) must not exceed $125,000 over two years (April 2023 to March 2025)
  • knowledge integration and risk communication proposals must not exceed $25,000 per project over one year (April 2023 to March 2024)
  • projects must be community-based (First Nations are the lead on the project)
    • The community, through its representatives must be involved in the project design, implementation and throughout all stages of the project
  • the lead of the primary research project and BAPHE must partner with a PhD or MSc-level scientist(s) who has a strong background in chemical/biological/radiological exposure assessment, and/or human biomonitoring and a track record of peer-reviewed publications in the field of the proposed project
  • the lead of the knowledge integration project must have at least a Bachelor's degree in environmental sciences, health sciences or education
  • the lead of the risk communication project must have or partner with an academically trained expert(s) (at least a BSc or MSc -level) with proven experience in conducting risk communication in the field of the proposed project
  • project outcomes must be linked to the human health impacts or mitigating human health impacts on community members (e.g. use results to develop recommendations for health promotion and disease prevention or to support mitigation measures, such as radon remediation. This requirement applies to the primary research, knowledge integration, and risk communication streams
  • for the BAPHE component, the project should focus on the assessment of baseline state of human health and environmental conditions in First Nations communities
  • primary research project proposals must include conventional research methodologies recommended by Health Canada that assess human exposure and body burden of contaminants through an appropriate combination of the following (knowledge integration/risk communication projects are exempt):
    • sampling of traditional foods, water, indoor air or soil (soil sampling must not pertain to a site risk assessment)

      In combination with

    • an appropriate human health exposure assessment methodology that would enable the examination of a link between environmental exposure and human health. For example, human exposure assessments focused on traditional foods would require dietary surveys through the administration of a 24-hour dietary recall and/or a Food Frequency Questionnaire, or biomonitoring where appropriate
  • the BAPHE project proposals must include conventional methodologies that assess baseline health status and environmental conditions
  • project must include the integration of local and/or traditional knowledge
  • a project that has previously received funding from the First Nations Environmental Contaminants Program must include a summary of the analysis and results from the previous project(s) and, if appropriate, needs to demonstrate how the new proposal builds on previous project results
  • project proposal must demonstrate how it will report on the implementation and results of the project
  • project proposal must state which accredited laboratory will be used to analyze samples (NB: knowledge integration/risk communication projects are exempt from this requirement)
  • projects partnering with other nearby First Nations communities will be given more points than proposals that do not partner with other communities
  • project proposal must include a Band Council Resolution for the community that is applying for the funding and/or a letter of support from the organization that is submitting the proposal. If two or more communities participate in the research project, the partnering community(s) must provide a letter of support(s) acknowledging the partnership
  • project proposal that suggest/plan potential mitigation measures in case any hazards are identified will be given extra points (knowledge integration/risk communication projects are exempt)
  • projects seeking additional funding from external sources must provide a letter of commitment from the funding organization(s)
  • primary research projects focusing on radon exposure assessment and monitoring should provide a letter of support from the Director of Housing supporting the project and expressing a commitment to request and provide funds for radon remediation in homes with radon levels exceeding the Health Canada radon guideline (200bq/m2)
  • project proposal must include all elements outlined in "PROPOSAL TEMPLATE"

B) Science peer review

If the proposal passes Mandatory Criteria Review, it will then undergo an external Science Peer Review, which will cover the suitability of project design, project team expertise, sound methodology, timeframe, budget, etc.

The Science Peer reviewers will use the following criteria to evaluate each eligible proposal.

Table 1: Criteria used by science peer reviewers to evaluate a primary research or BAPHE project proposal
Description Rating
Scientific excellence/expertise of principal investigator and team Relevant academic credentials /20
Relevant experience/ expertise/ knowledge /20
Relevant publication track /10
Methodology Clarity and scope of objectives /20
Clarity, adequacy and sound methodology /20
Suitability of proposal design for meeting the objectives /20
Does the proposal include a review of existing literature on key topics of the proposal?   /10
Does the proposal include a knowledge translation plan?   /20
Achievable within the appropriate timeframe (two years)?   /10
Appropriateness of budget (professional fee and services, community consultations, cost of lab analyses/equipment, stationery, community support (salary and honoraria), travel-associated expenses, etc.)   /25
Overall clarity and organization of a proposal   /25
Total   /200
Table 2: Criteria used by science peer reviewers to evaluate a knowledge integration or risk communication proposal
Description Rating
Scientific excellence/expertise of principal investigator and team: Relevant academic credentials /25
Relevant experience/expertise/knowledge /25
Methodology: Clarity on the objectives, topic and scope of a knowledge integration/risk communication proposal /30
Clarity on search strategy and literature selection criteria /30
Does the proposal include a knowledge translation plan?   /20
Achievable within the appropriate timeframe (one year)?   /10
Appropriateness of budget (professional fees and services, community support (salary/scholarship/honoraria), stationery, travel-associated expenses, etc.)   /30
Overall clarity and organization of a proposal   /30
Total   /200

C) Community based merit review

Once the science peer review is completed, a First Nations-led Selection Committee who have a strong background in environmental monitoring and First Nations' health and community issues, will review and assess aspects in the proposal that include community involvement, strengthening capacity, training, traditional knowledge, etc.

The Selection Committee uses the following criteria to evaluate each eligible proposal.

Table 3: Criteria used by the selection committee to evaluate a primary research or BAPHE proposal
Description Rating
Does the project team include: community-based researcher(s) and community member(s) /20
principal investigator(s)/project leader with recognized skills and relevant expertise? /20
Does the project engage community members with different types of knowledge expertise? This could include: fishers, hunters and trappers /5
environmental specialists /5
health practitioners /5
community planners/coordinators /5
youth, Elders, women /5
Does the project demonstrate a rigorous approach to community engagement? Does the project strengthen capacity in First Nations communities? /10
Does the project involve the community in the research project design development? /10
Does the project provide local training opportunities for First Nations involved? /10
Does the project include the hiring and engagement of community members? /10
Does the project support engagement of youth? Are there any beneficial activities for youth (e.g. learning new skills, knowledge acquired)? /10
Has Traditional Knowledge been integrated into the research? Are Traditional Knowledge Holders (e.g. Elders) engaged throughout all project stages (project development, sample collection, data analysis, communication of results, etc.)? /15
Are there plans to communicate and incorporate Traditional Knowledge into the project results? /10
Does the proposal include well thought out plans for communicating with the community during the project and sharing research results with the community when it is completed? Will the project activities and results be communicated to the community throughout all project stages? /10
Will the results be communicated/disseminated to other interested parties and decision-makers (e.g. funding organizations, other First Nation communities, governments, etc.)? Are there plans to communicate the results regionally, nationally or internationally (e.g., conferences)? /10
Are communications activities well budgeted in their proposal? /5
Is the time frame for completion of the project feasible?   /10
Are the budget and resource requirements realistic and appropriate to the project (professional fee services, community consultations, cost of lab analyses/equipment and facilities, stationery, community support (salary and honoraria), travel-associated expenses, etc.)?   /10
Has co-funding been sought with partners?   /10
Does the proposal suggest/plan potential mitigation measures in case any hazards have been identified?   /20
Is there another community that is partnering with the head proponent?   /25
Total   /240
Table 4: Criteria used by the selection committee to evaluate a knowledge integration or risk communication proposal
Description Rating
Does the project team include: community-based researcher(s) and community member(s), and /20
principal investigator(s)/project leader with recognized skills and relevant expertise? /20
Does the project engage different forms of expertise? This could include environmental specialists, fishers, hunters and trappers, health practitioners, community planners, youth, Elders, women, etc.   /25
Does the project demonstrate a rigorous approach to community engagement? Does the project involve the community in the project implementation? /20
Does the project support engagement of youth? Are there any beneficial activities for youth (e.g., learning new skills, knowledge acquired)? /20
Does the project include the hiring and engagement of community members? /20
Has Traditional Knowledge been integrated into the research? Are Traditional Knowledge Holders (e.g., Elders) engaged in the project? /20
Does the proposal include well thought out plans for communicating with the community during the project and sharing research results with the community when it is completed? Will the project activities and results be communicated to the community? /10
Will the results be communicated/disseminated to other interested parties and decision-makers (e.g. funding organizations, other First Nation communities, governments, etc.)? /10
Are there plans to communicate the results regionally, nationally or internationally (e.g., conferences, workshops, publications in peer-reviewed journals)? /10
Are communications activities well budgeted in their proposal? /10
Is the time frame for completion of the project feasible?   /10
Are the budget and resource requirements realistic and appropriate to the project (professional fee services, community consultations, cost of lab analyses/equipment and facilities, stationery, community support (salary and honoraria), travel-associated expenses, etc.)?   /10
Has co-funding been sought with partners?   /10
Is there another community that is partnering with the lead proponent?   /25
Total   /240

Once proposals have been evaluated, they will be ranked, and funding recommendations will be communicated to the FNECP Secretariat of the EPHD, FNIHB, ISC.

Proposal template

(In preparing your proposal, please use the list of tips and questions provided in each section below)

Proposal element checklist:

Cover page

First Nations Environmental Contaminants Program

Project title:

Research stream/component:

Applicant Information

Name of community or organization:
Address:
Telephone:
E-mail:

Name of Chief:
Address:
Telephone:
E-mail:

Name of community lead/coordinator for project:
Address:
Telephone:
E-mail:

Name of community financial manager:
Address:
Telephone:
Fax:
E-mail:

* Insert official organization logo here

Scientific Partner

Name of academic institution:
Name of Principal Investigator:
Address:
Telephone:
Fax:
E-mail:

Date of Submission:

Amount of Funding Requested from Indigenous Services Canada: $

Plain language summary

(Maximum 1 page)

  • give an overview or a story that explains what you want to research.
    • introduce the question(s) that the project will answer
    • why is this important to your community?
    • how is this project linked to environmental contaminants?
    • how is this project linking environmental contaminants to the health of community members?
    • how will the anticipated results of the project help your community?
  • what activities are you proposing to do to answer these questions?
    • who will be involved (e.g. youth, males, females, hunters, etc.)?
    • where and when will the project work be done?
  • what are the expected outcomes or results of the project?
  • how can the information from this project be useful to others?

TO NOTE: The research proposal needs to demonstrate a strong link between environmental contaminants and the health of First Nations. This link needs to be evident throughout your proposal.

AND

It needs to be clear throughout the proposal that this project is driven by the community in the hopes that the outcomes will benefit that community.

Table of contents

Create a table of contents with page numbers. This is a list that includes all the major sections in your proposal. The sections should be the ones in the column to the left.

Community background

(Maximum 2 pages)

This is the opportunity to share information about the community and why this project is important. Please include the following information in this section:

  1. Some information on the history of your community (e.g. population information, main activities of community members, history of the presence of environmental contaminants, etc.).
  2. Explain what makes your community vulnerable to environmental contaminants (e.g. past and present industrial activities, dependence on country foods, pesticide use, etc.).
  3. How does your community's vulnerability to environmental contaminants impact health issues in your community (e.g. food safety, access to safe drinking well water, altered lifestyles/cultural activities, etc.)?
  4. Are environmental contaminants and their effects on health an issue for particular members of your community (e.g. Elders, women, children, etc.)?

Project description

Introduction

  • describe the project (purpose, scope, type)
  • provide a literature review that summarizes any previous research on your topic (maximum one-two pages) with references). If no information exists, please indicate this. Describe any other similar projects that have been undertaken in First Nations communities. Please cite these studies
  • describe how your project will build on previous research/projects or answer a new question that has not yet been answered or considered
  • indicate if this project is a continuation of any other community research project including the names of any partners and funders. Include a summary of the analysis and results

Rational

  • how have environmental contaminants affected the health of your community and/or how might they affect your community in the future?
  • have steps been undertaken in the past to understand or solve this issue? If so, what were they, and were they effective? Why or why not?
  • how will your community benefit from this project?
  • how will the outcomes of the research be of direct or indirect relevance for other First Nations communities?

Objectives

Objectives are planned outcomes that outline what you intend to achieve through your project in the short and long term. Objectives are measurable and time-sensitive so that they can be evaluated and adjusted if necessary.

  • what are your short-term objectives for this project?
  • what are your long-term objectives for this project?

Develop a few simple objectives for your proposed research. Ask yourselves "What do we want to accomplish with this research?" and "Can we do this throughout this one- or two-year project?" Make sure that your sentences use active verbs. Restrict yourselves to a maximum of 5 objectives. You must be able to measure your progress towards your objectives during the research. Your objectives should also help you select your methodologies, and form a guide to your data analysis and presentation of results.

An example of a short-term objective for a research proposal: "Determine the quantity and frequency of traditional foods consumed by community members over the prior year".

Methodology and data collection

Primary research and BAPHE project proposals

Describe how you will accomplish the research activities outlined in the work plan (e.g. data collection methods including population sampling strategies, community consultations, analyses of results, etc.). Data can include any of the following: interview transcripts, water samples, plant samples, animal samples, photos, videos, etc. Please identify the activity number for each activity.

  • where will the work be conducted?
  • how will the data be collected, analyzed, interpreted, disseminated and stored?
    • where and when will sampling take place?
    • who will participate in the study (e.g. youth, males, females, hunters, etc.)? What sampling method will be used? How many people will be selected?
    • how many samples of water, sediments and types of plants, mammals or fish will be collected? What tissues of animals will be selected?
    • who will analyze the data and interpret the results?
    • how will the data be protected and shared throughout the research project?
    • who will own the data?
    • who will be able to access the data?
    • who will have control over the data?
    • how will the First Nations' principles of Ownership, Control, Access and Possession (OCAP) be respected?
    • if your community has an existing protocol, please include details.
    • which accredited laboratory will you use to analyze your samples for contaminants?

Please see examples of conventional methodologies that may be used in the study. You can include one or a combination of the following:

  • fish, mammals, plants, water, and/or sediment sampling along with sampling protocol pertaining to also assessing the extent of the community members' exposure to the sampled media
  • hair, blood, urine, and/or breast milk sampling along with sampling protocol
  • administration of a 24-hour dietary recall or a Food Frequency Questionnaire to the same individuals as those who supplied hair, blood, urine or breast milk samples
  • administration of semi-structured interviews to the same individuals as those who supplied hair, blood, urine or breast milk samples
  • social, health and lifestyle questionnaire (see example in Annex 3)
  • creation of a seasonal or "harvest" calendar to capture information such as harvesting periods, species, and locations of the harvest to show month-to-month variations and constraints potentially linked to environmental contamination. This calendar can also include information related to pesticide application, snowmelt, storms, industrial production peek, etc.
  • examination of secondary health data such as hospitalization records, nursing station records, etc.
  • collect information on perceptions about the research issue or to capture local histories related to your research topic
Knowledge integration/Risk communication proposals
  • describe the scope of work
  • provide details on search strategy and types of knowledge (e.g., published, verbal communications, interviews, surveys, community reports, etc.) and the type of publications selected (e.g., peer-reviewed journal articles, books, government documents, etc.)
  • list knowledge integration methods and other search tools (e.g., databases) that will be part of the project and/or will be consulted to find relevant sources
  • describe inclusion/exclusion criteria for the selection of literature
  • outline the planned report structure for a knowledge integration/risk communication project

Activities/outcomes

  • describe the research activities that will take place during your research project. Be sure to describe how each activity is connected to your project objectives
  • state the expected results and project deliverables (e.g. reports, publications, conferences/workshops, communication initiatives and/or materials such as newsletters, pamphlets, plain-language summary, videos, etc.)
  • please state if you plan to develop consumption recommendations from the results

Activities are more specific and detailed statements than your objectives. You can have many activities for each one of your objectives.

Please see activities to reach the objective previously given as an example (for a research proposal only):
"Determine the quantity and frequency of traditional foods consumed by community members over the prior year" could be, for example:

Activity 1: "Using the Band Council list, randomly select 40 individuals of different age and gender groups to participate in the research".

Activity 2: "Inform selected participants about the project and seek their written consent".

Activity 3: "Administer a food frequency questionnaire to these participants".

Strengthening Capacity

  • explain how your project will provide/engage your community with new tools/knowledge/methods to increase the ability to better understand and manage the health impacts of environmental contaminants
  • provide detailed information on how this project will support community members' engagement in research. Will any local training be involved?

Traditional Knowledge

  • the integration of traditional knowledge is a key component in research. Explain how your project will incorporate and protect traditional knowledge and culture

Youth

  • the FNECP strongly encourages the engagement of youth in projects. Please provide details as to how youth will be involved. Give examples of planned activities and how they can or will be beneficial (e.g. new skills and knowledge acquired)

Workplan and timelines

Prepare a table with a list of each activity of the project with an assigned activity number, the timelines for each activity, and any factors that might affect timing (e.g. seasons, availability of resources, migration patterns, etc.).

Table: Workplan and timelines
Project objective Activity description Timeline/ dates Factors affecting timing Activity #
         
         
         
         
         
         
         
         

IMPORTANT: Principal investigator(s) are required to be committed to complete the project. If they have to leave the project because of unforeseen reasons, they must notify the community project manager/lead/coordinator and the FNECP secretariat, find a replacement with the same expertise/experience and provide an addendum to the proposal. The replacement must be acceptable to the community.

Project team/partners-who will do the work?

  • this table should include all individuals who will be involved in the project including their name, affiliation, role within the project, and the associated activity number (from the work plan) in which they will be participating. Be sure to list all of the partners that will be involved in this project (e.g. First Nations, government, agencies, groups, associations, academics, professionals, financial contributors, etc.)
  • all scientific project team members and the community project manager/lead/coordinator must provide their resumes or CVs along with a list of relevant publications
Table: Project team and partners, their affiliations and project roles
Name Contact information (phone/email) Affiliation Project role Associated activity #
         
         
         
         
         
         
         
         

Communication and/or dissemination plan

  • describe in detail how the results will be communicated to the community throughout the project (e.g. Facebook, newsletter, a community bulletin, etc.)
  • describe how the results will be communicated or disseminated to other interested parties and decision-makers (e.g. funding organizations, other First Nation communities, governments, etc.)
  • describe how the project's results will be communicated regionally, nationally or internationally (e.g., peer-reviewed publications, presentations at conferences, etc.)

TO NOTE: The FNECP secretariat has to be informed about upcoming scientific publications prepared of funded projects' results.

All scientific publications submitted to peer-reviewed journals as well as conference presentations have to acknowledge the Indigenous Services Canada (FNECP) as a funding program.

IMPORTANT: Think of how you will report sampling results (e.g. hair, blood) to research participants. This should protect the confidentiality of individuals.

Project evaluation

  • indicate how the project will be evaluated and by whom. How will you determine the successes and lessons learned?
  • for suggestions on how you might structure your evaluation please see the information at the end of this document Suggestions for Developing Your Project Evaluation

Budget

Provide a detailed budget breakdown for core expenditures, administrative/management costs and funding/support from other sources for each year of the project, as well as a total budget for the duration of the project. You should feel free to remove or add budget categories based on your own needs.

Core expenditures

Salaries and wages:

Indicate the salaries paid to people specifically hired for the project, and the amount of time they will dedicate to the project ($ per hour/day/week).

Honoraria:

Honorarium compensation for participants (e.g. Elders) is a gratuitous payment as distinguished from compensation for service or hire and is often used as a way to thank them for their time and knowledge. Honoraria should not be used as an alternative to a service contract or as a replacement for salary, wages or professional fees.

Professional service fees (If appropriate):

Indicate the estimated total value of each contract to be awarded under the project, the contractor's name (if known), and the purpose of the contract. For any services provided by a community member (e.g. labourers, Elders), the community member should be identified in the proposal by name.

Travel, accommodations and meal costs:

Include all travel, accommodations and meal costs, and indicate the purpose of travel. Please use government travel rates by visiting the Travel Directive of the Treasury Board of Canada Secretariat website, Appendix C—Meal & Incidental Rates (Canada/USA).

Equipment and facilities:

Equipment cost. Specify the type of equipment that is needed to conduct your project and the extent to which it will be used (e.g. camera, microphone, monitoring or sampling equipment).

Laboratory expenses:

Provide estimates for laboratory testing and analysis (cost per sample) accompanied by laboratory quotes

TO NOTE: All equipment purchased with FNECP funding is to remain the sole property of the First Nations communities and to be used for public good, and not be in the private ownership as a condition of not returning it to the Crown. The project team has to submit a letter from the First Nation's financial officer stating that the equipment will continue to be used for public purposes after the end of the project.

IMPORTANT: Fees for professional services offered by consulting firms cannot exceed 40% of the total fund provided by the FNECP in order to ensure economic equity between the scientific and community partners.

Administrative/management costs

The First Nations and Inuit Health Branch will allow up to 10% of the total agreement amount for administration costs.

Operating costs:
  • office materials and supplies, telephone, printing, computer time, fax, postage
  • supplies (including lab supplies)
  • publication costs (specify publisher and projected date of publication)
  • administration fees (if applicable)

Other costs

If any budget item does not fit into any of the above categories of expenditure, it must be entered as "Other" with a brief description.

Budget Summary

Total funding requested from Indigenous Services Canada = $

Total support from other sources, including in-kind = $

The total cost of the project (Indigenous Services Canada request plus the support from other sources) = $

IMPORTANT: The FNECP funding as well as funding from external sources have to be used exclusively for the objectives as per the proposal.

PLEASE COMPLETE YOUR BUDGET USING THE BUDGET TABLE PROVIDED BELOW.

Use a separate table for each year, and an additional table for the overview of all years.

TO NOTE: Indigenous Services Canada's fiscal year runs from April 1st to March 31st. Please align your budget with these dates.

Table: Project budget
Expense Description Indigenous services Canada funding request Funding from other sources (including in-kind) Comments Associated activity #
Core Expenditures
Salary          
Salary          
Salary          
Honoraria          
Benefits          
Professional services          
Translation          
Training fees          
Transportation, accommodation and meals          
Equipment and facilities          
Laboratory expenses (detailed with cost per sample)          
Other          
Core Expenditures Subtotal 1          
Administrative/Management Costs (maximum 10% of total request from Indigenous Services Canada)
Office materials/supplies          
Copier and photocopies          
Telephone and telecommunication          
Material and equipment rental          
Maintenance and repairs          
Postage, shipping and handling          
Accounting fees          
Human resources, pay-services          
Other          
Admin Subtotal 2          
Total Cost of Project
(subtotal 1 plus subtotal 2)
         

Research ethics review

Every human health research project involving First Nations will be required to obtain an Approval Certificate from at least one Ethics Review Board or committee before receiving funding approval from the FNECP (e.g. University Research Ethics Board).

The Research Ethics Review does not need to be completed at the time of application but will be needed before funding can be provided. Your project team will be responsible for this part of the review.

Letter(s) of support from a mandated authority

  • letter(s) of support by a mandated authority (Band Councils, hunters and trappers organizations, hamlet councils, municipalities, First Nations organization, etc.) for each community involved in your project should be included in your submission The letter(s) should be on official letterhead and be signed by an authorized person
  • all funded projects are required to provide a Band Council Resolution from the community leading the project
  • successful projects might be asked to provide certification documentation for their organization (e.g. letter of incorporation, registration number, bylaw, audited financial statements etc.). It is therefore recommended that applicants keep these files nearby in case the project is funded. Communities are encouraged to communicate with their appropriate authorities/community representatives to obtain any approvals needed for their proposed research

References

Include reference to any documents, publications, or third party information that you used in writing your proposal. This is a very important part of your proposal as it shows that your research would build on existing knowledge.

Appendices

This could include the following:

  • relevant background information (if available)
  • relevant project materials that you may have ready such as interview questions, questionnaires, laboratory quotes, consent forms (sample to follow), etc.

Resumes/CV for each project team member

  • resumes or CVs are required to show that the person conducting the research, and the research team members, have the knowledge and skills required to successfully run this research project
  • all scientific project team members and the community project manager/lead/coordinator must provide their resumes or CVs along with a list of relevant publications

Annexes

Sample consent forms

Place community logo here

Sample consent form

Name of project: ________________________________________

Project start/end date: ________________________________________

Purpose of Project: ________________________________________

Name of Interviewee: ________________________________________

Name of Interviewer(s): ________________________________________

Place: ________________________________________

Date: ________________________________________

I, _____________________ the (state the name of your project).

1) The participants are informed that:

  1. This is an invitation for you to participate in this study,
    1. You have a right to choose to not participate at any time.
    2. You have the right to not answer any questions that you are not comfortable with, before the interview has even started or during the interview.
    3. The data/information collected is going to be permanently stored by (state who will store the data and who will have access to it).
  2. The interview recordings, whether they are audio, video, written or photographic, and the resulting translations, and/or transcriptions and/or images will be used for the following purposes: (list the purposes)
    1.  
    2.  
    3.  

Place community logo here

Sample consent form

(Name your organization or community) will not use the interview recordings, whether they are audio, video, written or photographic, and the resulting translations and/or transcriptions and/or images, for any other purposes without the consent of the interviewee.

Participant Name (Print Name)

Date

Participant Signature

Date

Witness Signature

Date

(Name of organization or community) agrees to use the information according to the terms outlined above.

Signature of Interviewer

Date

Copy Provided to Participant:

YES

NO

Suggestions for developing you project evaluation

(Not mandatory but very useful)

Evaluation techniques

Below please find some evaluation techniques you might want to include as part of your project evaluation:

Activity Logs: Track regular activities and provide a running account of what happened. These can provide anecdotal information that is not usually captured in more formal surveys or consultations. Keeping an activity log is a great tool to assist in writing reports, providing regular updates on initiatives, and providing valuable qualitative data to evaluations.

Surveys: Surveys consist of a series of closed or open-ended questions. They can be done by hand, on-line, over the telephone, through email or face-to-face. Surveys are easy to administer; however, developing questions that are easy to understand and measure can be difficult. Plan to test out survey questions on colleagues and members of your target audience ahead of time so you can modify them accordingly.

Interviews: An interview is a conversation between two or more people where questions are asked by the interviewer to obtain information from the interviewee. Interviews can be done over the telephone, on the radio or face-to-face.

Focus groups: Focus groups provide opportunities for an in-depth engagement. Traditionally they consist of between 6 to 10 participants with a particular interest, involvement or stake in the subject being discussed. During focus groups, a facilitator leads the group through a series of questions with a recorder summarizing the discussions.

Community engagement: Community engagement brings together interested people for information and discussion of an issue. Community engagement is open to the public and can attract either a small or a large group based on the level of interest in the issue being discussed. During community engagement, presentations are given followed by a facilitated discussion.

Audits: An audit is a form of evaluation that assesses an organization, system, process, project or product. It can consist of simple inventories (e.g. how many community freezers are in a community) or be more detailed such as the assessment of how many community members have access to safe drinking water. An audit can be performed at the beginning of a project to provide a baseline for future measurements. By doing this you are able to track changes, modify activities and determine their impact.

Developing a project evaluation table

To structure your project evaluation you might want to consider developing a table that includes your objectives and activities. If you want to develop a table, below are some suggestions that might be helpful.

  • fill in the objectives and activities by copying what you have already completed in the previous sections of the proposal
  • for each activity, include performance indicators that will be used to evaluate the activities. Performance indicators are qualitative or quantitative measures used to monitor project performance. Quantitative indicators are statistical measures such as number, frequency, percentile, ratios, variance, etc. Qualitative indicators are judgment and perception measures such as the presence or absence of specific conditions, the extent and quality of participation, or level of satisfaction
  • for each performance indicator, describe how data will be collected and what tools will be used (some techniques are described above)
  • include any comments (if needed) to further explain what you plan to do
Table: Project evaluation
Project objectives Project activities Performance indicators Data collection techniques/tools Comments
         
         
         
         
         
         
         
         

Example of the social, health and lifestyle questionnaire

The social, health and lifestyle questionnaire below is derived from the First Nations Food, Nutrition & Environment Study (FNFNES), and can be used/modified as needed. Please refer to: www.fnfnes.ca

III. Social, health and lifestyle questionnaire

This questionnaire is short and addresses questions about your household and the role and use of traditional food in your household. Remember, traditional food is food that is coming from the local land and environment, such as fish, birds, land animals and plants. Can I start with the first question?

1. How many persons, including yourself, live in your household now? (i.e., this month) Include children and adults, but not visitors. To live in your household, this means that they have meals and sleep there at least 3 nights per week.

  1. how many are less than 15 yrs of age _____
  2. how many are between 15 and 65 _____
  3. how many are over 65 _____

2. How many persons, including yourself, living in your household are either self-employed or an employee now? (i.e., this month)

  1. full-time (≥ 35 hours/week) _____
  2. part-time (< 35 hours/week) _____

3. What is your main source of income? (circle one)

  1. wages/salary/self-employment
  2. pension/seniors benefits
  3. social assistance
  4. worker's compensation/employment insurance

4. How many years of school have you completed? Please don't count partial years, kindergarten or grades repeated _____ years

4b. Have you obtained the following diplomas, certificates, or degrees?:

a. high school diploma

yes

no

 

b. GED (high school equivalency)

yes

no

not applicable

c. vocational training certificate

yes

no

 

d. CEGEP diploma (Quebec only)

yes

no

not applicable

e. bachelor's degree

yes

no

 

f. master's degree

yes

no

 

g. doctorate degree

yes

no

 

5. During the past year, did you personally:

a. hunt or set snares for food?

yes

no

b. fish?

yes

no

c. collect wild plant food?

yes

no

d. collect seafood?

yes

no

e. plant a garden?

yes

no

6. During the past year, did anyone else in your household:

a. hunt or set snares for food?

yes

no

b. fish?

yes

no

c. collect wild plant food?

yes

no

d. collect seafood?

yes

no

e. plant a garden?

yes

no

7. In the following question, we would like to know how you compare traditional (wild) and market (store-bought) foods:

  1. What do you think are the most important benefits of traditional food? Please state as many as you wish.
 
 
 
 

Traditional Food Attributes:

  • 1= healthy/nutritious
  • 2= natural/safe
  • 3= availability
  • 4= cheap/free
  • 5= taste
  • 6= cultural
  • 7= variety
  • 8= filling
  • 9= medicinal
  • 10= physical activity
  • 11= family time
  • 12= fresh
  • 13= no answer, don't know
  • 14= other
  1. What do you think are the most important benefits of traditional food? Please state as many as you wish.
 
 
 
 

Market Food Attributes:

  • 1= availability/ convenient
  • 2= variety
  • 3= healthy/ nutritious
  • 4= labelling
  • 5= fresh
  • 6= survival
  • 7= taste
  • 8= food safety
  • 9= cheaper
  • 10= no answer/ don't know/ none
  • 11= other

8a. Would your household like to have more traditional food?

yes no (if no, go to Q. 9)

8b. Can you tell me what prevents your household from using more traditional food?

 
 
 
 

Barriers:

  • 1= lack of equipment/ transportation
  • 2= lack of hunter
  • 3= lack of time
  • 4= lack of availability
  • 5= lack of money to buy
  • 6= lack of knowledge
  • 7= difficult to access
  • 8= Government restrictions
  • 9= physical/ health reasons
  • 10= cost of equipment/ gas
  • 11= too tired
  • 12= pesticides/contaminants
  • 13= don't eat TF
  • 14= no answer/ don't know
  • 15= no barrier/ have enough TF
  • 16= other

8c. Some families might say, "We worried whether our traditional food would run out before we could get more." In the last 12 months, did that happen often, sometimes, or never for your household?

a. often

b. sometimes

c. never

d. don't know or refused

8d. Some families might say, "The traditional food that we got just didn't last, and we couldn't get any more." In the last 12 months, did that happen often, sometimes, or never for your household?

a. often

b. sometimes

c. never

d. don't know or refused

9a. Have you noticed any significant climate change in your traditional territory in the last 10 years?

yes no (if no, go to Q. 10)

9b. Can you tell me one way how this has affected traditional food availability in your household?

 
 
 
 

10a. Do any of the following affect (or limit) where you can hunt, fish or collect berries?

a. mining

yes

no

do not know

b. forestry

yes

no

do not know

c. oil and gas

yes

no

do not know

d. hydro

yes

no

do not know

e. farming

yes

no

do not know

f. Government restrictions

yes

no

do not know

g. other

(specify): __________

10b. Are any of the following traditional foods less available because of the above limits?

a. moose

yes

no

do not know

b. deer

yes

no

do not know

c. small mammals

yes

no

do not know

d. salmon

yes

no

do not know

e. other fish

(specify): ____________________

f. shellfish

yes

no

do not know

g. berries

yes

no

do not know

h. other plants

yes

no

do not know

 

if yes, please specify: ____________________

i. other traditional foods

yes

no

do not know

 

if yes, please specify: ____________________

11. In general, compared to other people of your age, would you say your health is:

  1. excellent
  2. very good
  3. good
  4. fair
  5. poor

12. Which of the following statements best describes your activities for most days when you are in the community?

  1. I am usually sitting and do not walk around very much.
  2. I stand or walk around quite a lot, but I do not have to carry or lift things very often.
  3. I usually lift or carry light loads or I have to climb stairs or walk up hills often.
  4. I do heavy work or carry heavy loads.

13. In general, compared to other people of your age, are you physically:

  1. more active
  2. less active
  3. about average
  4. don't know

14a. Did you smoke cigarettes yesterday? yes no

14b. [if yes above, ask] How many? __________

15. Have you ever been told by a health care provider that you have:

a. pre-diabetes (borderline diabetes)

yes

no

b. diabetes

yes

no

If yes, circle type if known: Type 1 / Type 2 / unknown

c. cardiovascular (heart) disease

yes

no

d. other chronic illness

yes

no

If yes, please specify ______________________________

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