2023 to 2027 Departmental Sustainable Development Strategy

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ISSN: 2563-5522 

Errata

Subsequent to the tabling in Parliament and online publication of the 2023 to 2027 Departmental Sustainable Development Strategy, an issue was identified with the version reported where some information was omitted. HTML and PDF versions have been corrected.

Table of contents

Section 1: Introduction to the Departmental Sustainable Development Strategy

The 2022 to 2026 Federal Sustainable Development Strategy (FSDS) presents the Government of Canada's sustainable development goals and targets, as required by the Federal Sustainable Development Act. This is the first FSDS to be framed using the 17 Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) of the United Nations 2030 Agenda and provides a balanced view of the environmental, social and economic dimensions of sustainable development.

In keeping with the purpose of the Act, to make decision-making related to sustainable development more transparent and accountable to Parliament, Indigenous Services Canada supports the goals laid out in the FSDS through the activities described in this Departmental Sustainable Development Strategy (DSDS).

The Federal Sustainable Development Act also sets out 7 principles that must be considered in the development of the FSDS as well as DSDSs. These basic principles have been considered and incorporated in Indigenous Services Canada's DSDS.

In order to promote coordinated action on sustainable development across the Government of Canada, this departmental strategy integrates efforts to advance Canada's implementation of the 2030 Agenda National Strategy, supported by the Global Indicator Framework (GIF) and Canadian Indicator Framework (CIF) targets and indicators. The strategy also now captures SDG initiatives that fall outside the scope of the FSDS to inform the development of the Canada's Annual Report on the 2030 Agenda and the SDGs.

Section 2: Indigenous Services Canada's Sustainable Development Vision

Individuals in a boat with mountains and water in the background

Indigenous Services Canada (ISC) works with partners to improve access to high quality services for First Nations, Inuit and Métis Peoples. ISC addresses key priority areas and focuses on core services linked to advancing health, supporting families, helping build sustainable communities, and supporting Indigenous communities in self-determination. These priorities work together to ensure that the needs and concerns of First Nations, Inuit and Métis Peoples are recognized and addressed.

ISC remains committed to contributing to the Federal Sustainable Development Strategy (FSDS) and to supporting Canada's sustainable development priorities. ISC's sustainable development vision incorporates social, economic, and environmental considerations into departmental decision-making and in co-development with Indigenous peoples. This includes integrating perspectives from national Indigenous organizations such as Inuit Tapiriit Kanatami, Métis National Council, and Assembly of First Nations.

The foundation of ISC’s work is guided by the commitments made to Indigenous Peoples in the areas of health, child and family services, education, infrastructure and environment, economic development, and governance. Over the course of 2022-23, ISC focused on how it could more effectively address policies, programming and data gaps, and better meet the needs to transfer departmental responsibilities to Indigenous communities. Consequently, a renewed Departmental Results Framework was developed to support the Government of Canada’s the evolution of the Government of Canada’s policy agenda and programming with respect to recognizing and advancing priorities of First Nations, Inuit and Métis. This renewed commitment also supports sustainable development through a single core responsibility that focuses on Indigenous Well-Being and Self-Determination.

ISC will continue to ensure that eligible Indigenous individuals have access to services, address socioeconomic gaps and social factors having an impact on Indigenous health and well-being, and collaborate and cooperate with Indigenous Peoples and with the provinces and territories to implement the gradual transfer of service delivery to Indigenous organizations in support of self-determination.

Looking forward, ISC's 2023 to 2027 Departmental Sustainable Development Strategy (DSDS) provides a framework for taking action on climate change, promotion of modern and resilient infrastructure, access to clean drinking water, clean energy, healthy food choices, and building of safe and healthy communities. The DSDS aims to improve the health and socioeconomic outcomes of Indigenous communities, in recognition of their right to self-determination. The DSDS aligns with the Canadian Indicator Framework for the Sustainable Development Goals, the Quality of Life Framework, the Gender Results Framework, and items 2, 5, 6, 11, 13, 18, 19, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, and 26 from the 30 actions to 2030 of Canada's 2030 Agenda National Strategy.

ISC's DSDS aligns with fifteen of the seventeen long-term goals identified in the FSDS or to the United Nations Sustainable Development Goals. Goal specific context that provides more detail on policies and programs will be further elaborated in the introductory text within Section 4.

Section 3: Listening to Canadians

As required by the Federal Sustainable Development Act, ISC has taken into account comments on the draft 2022-2026 FSDS made during the public consultation held from March to July 2022. During the public consultation, more than 700 comments were received from a broad range of stakeholders, including governments, Indigenous organizations, non-governmental organizations, academics, businesses, and individual Canadians in different age groups and of various backgrounds. The draft FSDS was also shared with the appropriate committee of each House of Parliament, the Commissioner of the Environment and Sustainable Development, and the Sustainable Development Advisory Council for their review and comment.

What We Heard

Across the submissions received, ISC identified the following sustainable development priorities and issues:

Prioritize universal clean drinking water access – The call for achieving clean drinking water for communities across Canada, with a specific focus on First Nations reserves, is urgent and demands immediate attention. The sentiment expressed is that if this issue were impacting a major city, it would be swiftly addressed. Therefore, ensuring clean drinking water becomes the topmost priority is advocated. The suggestion is to set ambitious goals, striving for 100% clean drinking water access in all areas inhabited by Indigenous communities.

Enhance disaster risk reduction – Canadians stressed the significance of improving disaster risk reduction efforts in Indigenous and Northern communities. This can be achieved through effective communication and collaboration with local Indigenous organizations, low-income residents, and marginalized communities within Canada.

Indigenous leadership in renewable energy – Comments requested that the government recognize Indigenous self-governance and provide support for Indigenous ownership and leadership in projects involving renewable energy and conservation.

What We Did

The 2023 to 2027 DSDS addresses these comments, as well as other priority areas that support Indigenous involvement and leadership.

ISC remains committed to eliminating long-term drinking water advisories by taking a wrap-around approach to ensure long-term investments are in place to prevent new advisories from occurring, and short-term ones from becoming long-term. As of June 30, 2023, 142 long-term drinking water advisories have been lifted from public systems on reserve since November 2015, with 28 remaining in effect in 26 First Nations. The Government of Canada continues to work in partnership with communities and remains committed to ending all long-term drinking water advisories on public systems on reserve as soon as possible. As identified in Goal 6, initiatives are underway to address all remaining long-term drinking water advisories on public systems on reserve.

The same applies to the risk management of disasters as identified in Goal 13. Through the Emergency Management Assistance Program, ISC will actively collaborate with partners to deliver comprehensive emergency assistance services. ISC supports all four pillars of emergency management to improve community capacity and resilience to disasters. In doing so, the program contributes to the development of healthier and more sustainable communities by preventing, mitigating and reducing the disruption that emergency events such as floods and fires bring to the lives of impacted communities and individuals.

ISC's strategy in Goal 7 for promoting Indigenous self-governance and endorsing Indigenous ownership and leadership in renewable energy and conservation initiatives aligns with the suggestion received. The department will continue to support First Nations efforts to transition from fossil fuel to clean, reliable and affordable energy systems through a combination of alternative energy projects featuring solar, hydroelectric, wind and others. It will also support communities to improve and optimize energy systems through upgrades and energy efficiency projects.

Please find more information on the FSDS public consultation and its results in the FSDS Consultation Report.

Section 4: Indigenous Service Canada's Commitments

Goal 1: No Poverty


Reduce poverty in Canada in all its forms

ISC plays a lead federal role in taking effective action to reduce poverty on reserve. The on-reserve Income Assistance and Assisted Living programs are components of Canada's social safety net similar to provincial and territorial social assistance programs. Currently, ISC is working to improve these programs to help ensure that First Nations have access to culturally appropriate social programs and services that meet their needs. In particular, the department is working towards reforming the on-reserve Income Assistance program in co-development with First Nation partners to ensure the program is more responsive to the needs of individuals and families on-reserve and in Yukon. Similarly, the department is co-developing with its First Nations and Inuit partners options for a new long-term and continuing care framework that promotes client and community centered, holistic, and culturally safe approaches to care. In addition to these on-reserve programs, ISC's Urban Programming for Indigenous Peoples helps support the socio-economic well-being of the urban Indigenous population by providing financial support to a wide range of urban Indigenous organizations offering culturally appropriate programs and services that support vulnerable and at risk urban Indigenous populations (women and girls, seniors, persons with disabilities, and youth). ISC's efforts to offer and/or increase access to programs and services that are culturally relevant and safe, and that help improve the economic and social conditions of Indigenous Peoples are in line with several United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples (UNDRIP) articles.

Target theme:

Poverty Reduction

Target:

By 2030, reduce the poverty rate by 50% from its 2015 level (Minister of Families, Children and Social Development)

Implementation strategy: Make investments to reduce poverty
Departmental actions:

Address poverty on reserves by providing essential support, including funding for basic needs like food, clothing, rent, and utilities allowance.

Assist with special needs, including essential household items, personal incidentals, and doctor-recommended diets.

Offer pre-employment and employment support, including life skills training and job training, to empower individuals towards self-sufficiency.

  • Program: Income Assistance
  • Performance indicator: Percentage of residents living on reserve who are supported through Income Assistance
    • Starting point: 28.3% (2019 to 2020)
    • Target: To be determined by March 2024

How the departmental action contributes to the FSDS goal and target and, where applicable, to Canada's 2030 Agenda National Strategy and Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs):

Low-income individuals and families living on reserve and Status First Nations in Yukon can receive support through the Income Assistance program as a last resort where all other sources of funds have been exhausted. The Program provides funds for First Nations to cover the essential living expenses of eligible individuals and their families (i.e., those ordinarily resident on reserve or status Indians who live in Yukon). This supports Canada's efforts by acting as a social safety net and providing these essential supports on reserve, providing a level of stability to participants with no other means, which also makes a clear correlation with UNDRIP 21.1 and 21.2.

  • Associated Canadian Indicator Framework (CIF) targets or ambitions and/or Global Indicator Framework (GIF) targets:
    • CIF Ambition: Reduce poverty in Canada in all its forms
    • CIF Indicator: Poverty rate, as measured by Canada's official poverty line
    • GIF Target 1.3: Implement nationally appropriate social protection systems and measures for all, including floors, and by 2030 achieve substantial coverage of the poor and the vulnerable
    • GIF Target/SDG 1.2: By 2030, reduce at least by half the proportion of men, women and children of all ages living in poverty in all its dimensions according to national definitions

Implementation strategies supporting the goal

This section is for implementation strategies that support the goal "Reduce poverty in Canada in all its forms" but not a specific FSDS target.

Implementation strategy: Ensuring eligible low-income individuals have access to supports
Departmental action: Fund non-medical, social support services to seniors, adults with chronic illness, and children and adults with a disability (mental and physical) on-reserve to help them maintain their independence within their home communities.
  • Program: Assisted Living
  • Performance indicator: Percentage of cases where a resident on reserve was assessed for services from the Assisted Living Program and received those services
    • Starting point: 95% (2020 to 2021)
    • Target: 99% per year

How the departmental action contributes to the FSDS goal and target and, where applicable, to Canada's 2030 Agenda National Strategy and Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs):

The Assisted Living program provides in-home care, adult foster care, and institutional care for those needing personal non-medical 24-hour care. These program supports are accessible to eligible low-income individuals to help maintain their independence for as long as possible. This residency-based program provides funding to First Nations, provinces and the Yukon Territory on an annual basis through negotiated funding agreements for non-medical social supports, as well as training and support for service delivery so that seniors and persons with disabilities can maintain functional independence within their home communities. The program supports Canada's efforts by providing essential services to clients with no other means, and is also clearly aligned with UNDRIP articles 21.1, 21.2, 22.1, and 24.2.

  • Associated Canadian Indicator Framework (CIF) targets or ambitions and/or Global Indicator Framework (GIF) targets:
    • CIF Ambition: Reduce poverty in Canada in all its forms
    • CIF Indicator 1.3: Implement nationally appropriate social protection systems and measures for all, including floors, and by 2030 achieve substantial coverage of the poor and the vulnerable
    • GIF Target/SDG 1.2: By 2030, reduce at least by half the proportion of men, women and children of all ages living in poverty in all its dimensions according to national definitions
Goal 2: Zero Hunger


Support a healthier and more sustainable food system

As part of Crown-Indigenous Relations and Northern Affairs Canada's Nutrition North Canada initiative, ISC funds and supports community-based nutrition education activities in isolated northern communities to increase knowledge of healthy eating and skill development in selecting and preparing healthy store-bought and traditional or country food, and to improve healthy food access. Communities decide which activities to undertake, based on their local needs and priorities.

ISC continues to work with the Inuit Tapiriit Kanatami to co-chair the Inuit-Crown Food Security Working Group, and to work with Inuit partners and with other federal departments to advance shared actions and deliverables related to food security in the Inuit-Crown Partnership Committee Health and Wellness Work Plan. The Inuit-Crown Food Security Working Group was established in 2019 as a sub-group of the Inuit-Crown Partnership Committee, which provides a whole-of-government approach to addressing food security by leveraging the contribution of multiple Federal Departments and Agencies as well as Inuit Tapiriit Kanatami, the four regional Inuit Land Claim Organizations, Inuit Circumpolar Council Canada, Pauktuutit Inuit Women of Canada, and the National Inuit Youth Council.

Implementation strategies supporting the goal

This section is for implementation strategies that support the goal "Support a healthier and more sustainable food system" but not a specific FSDS target.

Implementation strategy:  Enhance Indigenous and northern food security
Departmental action: Support community-based nutrition education activities in isolated northern communities to increase knowledge of healthy eating and to develop skills in selecting and preparing healthy store-bought and traditional or country food, and to improve healthy food access.
  • Program: Public Health Promotion and Disease Prevention
  • Performance Indicator: Percentage of First Nations and Inuit communities offering nutrition education activities
    • Starting point: 97% (2021 to 2022)
    • Target: 100% by March 31, 2024
  • Performance Indicator: Number of participants taking part in nutrition education programs and activities
    • Starting point: 32,528 (2021 to 2022)
    • Target: At least 30,000 annually

How the departmental action contributes to the FSDS goal and target and, where applicable, to Canada's 2030 Agenda National Strategy and Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs):

ISC's continued support of Nutrition North Canada contributes to ensuring community-based nutrition education activities are available in isolated northern communities to increase knowledge of healthy eating and skill development in selecting and preparing healthy store-bought and traditional or country foods, and to improve healthy food access. When communities deliver nutrition education initiatives or activities, they are helping to enhance Indigenous and northern food security.

  • Associated Canadian Indicator Framework (CIF) targets or ambitions and/or Global Indicator Framework (GIF) targets:
    • CIF Ambition: Canadians have access to sufficient, affordable and nutritious food
    • GIF Target/SDG 2.1: By 2030, end hunger and ensure access by all people, in particular the poor and people in vulnerable situations, including infants, to safe, nutritious and sufficient food all year round
Goal 3: Good Health and Well-Being


Support mental health and adopt healthy behaviours

ISC aims to provide effective, sustainable, and culturally appropriate health programs and services that contribute to the reduction of gaps in health outcomes that persist between Indigenous and non-Indigenous individuals in Canada. The underlying objectives are to support the health needs of First Nations and Inuit by ensuring availability of, and access to, quality health services; supporting greater control of the health system by First Nations and Inuit; and, supporting the improvement of First Nations health programs and services through improved integration, harmonization, and alignment with provincial/territorial health systems.

ISC funds or provides a range of health programs and services to First Nations and Inuit, including community-based health programs to support healthy child development, mental wellness and healthy living. Driven by the government’s commitment to support mental wellness programming, ISC provides funding through its Mental Wellness Program, focusing on Indigenous-led, culturally-relevant, and community-based services such as mental wellness promotion, suicide prevention, crisis response, and substance use treatment and prevention services. These mental wellness supports are strongly guided by Indigenous-led frameworks such as the First Nations Mental Wellness Continuum Framework, Honouring Our Strengths, and the National Inuit Suicide Prevention Strategy. Each of these frameworks outline a comprehensive, strengths-based approach that identifies the need for specific supports for populations at risk, including across genders and for individuals who identify as 2SLGBTQI+. By highlighting key Indigenous social determinants of health, including self-determination, equity, and collaboration across all sectors both nationally and internationally, these frameworks not only support all pillars and goals of the Gender Results Framework, but also are designed to address the gendered impacts and experience of trauma and violence.

Broadband connectivity is crucial for digital health and virtual care, but high-speed internet connections are not yet accessible in all remote First Nations communities. ISC has partnered with Innovation, Science and Economic Development Canada to examine new technologies to improve internet connectivity speeds. While low-earth orbit satellites have been implemented in some remote and isolated communities, ISC will continue engaging with digital health organizations and First Nations partners to implement improvements in addressing service disruptions in community health facilities, public-health surveillance and other eHealth services.

Through improved integration, harmonization and alignment within Canada's health system comprising a complex network of federal, provincial, territorial and Indigenous health authorities (e.g., First Nations Health Authority in British Columbia), the underlying objectives of the department are to answer calls from Indigenous partners for healthcare services that are equitable, accessible, adequately and sustainably funded and self-determined. This includes taking action to address racism, discrimination and systemic violence within the health system.

Target theme:

Mental health

Target:

By March 2027, reduce the percentage of Canadians (aged 15+) with a mental health disorder who have expressed that they have an unmet care need to no more than 22% (Minister of Health)

Implementation strategy: Support distinctions-based approaches to mental wellness for First Nations, Inuit and Métis
Departmental action: Continue to work closely with Indigenous partners to support distinctions-based, Indigenous-led, culturally-relevant and community-based approaches to mental wellness for First Nations, Inuit and Métis. This includes continuing to be guided by Indigenous-led frameworks such as the First Nations Mental Wellness Continuum Framework, Honouring Our Strengths and the National Inuit Suicide Prevention Strategy.
  • Program: Public Health Promotion and Disease Prevention
  • Performance indicator: Percentage of First Nations and Inuit communities with access to mental wellness team services
    • Starting point: 81% as of March 2023
    • Target: 95% by March 2029

How the departmental action contributes to the FSDS goal and target and, where applicable, to Canada's 2030 Agenda National Strategy and Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs):

Mental health and wellness is related to the overall health status of Indigenous individuals and communities. Indigenous peoples in Canada experience inequities in mental wellness outcomes when compared to non-Indigenous people due to historical and ongoing impacts of colonization that is, racism, discrimination, systemic violence, intergenerational trauma. The Mental Wellness Program promotes Indigenous mental health and well-being by supporting First Nations, Inuit, and Métis-led approaches to mental health and wellness which can supplement and offset the lack of culturally safe and competent, community-grounded components in prioritized mental wellness programs and services offered by Provinces and Territories.

ISC is active in bringing together experts and community on the issue, such as through the National Summit on Indigenous Mental Wellness where best practices are shared and new collaborations are made with the goal to improve mental wellness services to Indigenous individuals.

  • Associated Canadian Indicator Framework (CIF) targets or ambitions and/or Global Indicator Framework (GIF) targets:
    • CIF Ambition: Canada prevents causes of premature death
    • GIF Target/SDG 3.4: By 2030, reduce by one third premature mortality from non-communicable diseases through prevention and treatment and promote mental health and well-being (3.4.2 Suicide mortality rate)
    • GIF Target/SDG 3.5: Strengthen the prevention and treatment of substance abuse, including narcotic drug abuse and harmful use of alcohol

Initiatives advancing Canada's implementation of SDG 3 – Good Health and Well-Being

The following initiatives demonstrate how Indigenous Services Canada programming supports the 2030 Agenda and the SDGs, supplementing the information outlined above.

Planned initiative: Elimination of Tuberculosis

ISC's health programs aim to improve Indigenous well-being and contribute to SDG 3 by focusing on healthy living and eliminating tuberculosis in Inuit Nunangat by 2030.

ISC collaborates with Inuit partners, and provides ongoing support through Budget 2018 and Budget 2023 for tuberculosis elimination. The department assisted Inuit Tapiriit Kanatami in developing the Inuit Tuberculosis Elimination Framework, guiding regional action plans for public health programs. ISC's Public Health Surge Team offers in-person and virtual support during tuberculosis outbreaks, including in Inuit Nunangat. Efforts are underway to address delays in accessing tuberculosis drugs not yet approved in Canada through alternative means.

  • Program: Public Health Promotion and Disease Prevention
  • Associated Canadian Indicator Framework (CIF) targets or ambitions and/or Global Indicator Framework (GIF) targets:
    • CIF Ambition: Canada prevents causes of premature death
    • CIF Target 3.11: Eliminate tuberculosis across Inuit Nunangat by 2030, and reduce the incidence of active tuberculosis by at least 50% by 2025
    • CIF Indicator 3.11.1: Tuberculosis incidence per 100,000 population in Inuit Nunangat
Goal 4: Quality Education


Promote knowledge and skills for sustainable development

ISC is dedicated to working closely with Indigenous communities to bridge the knowledge and skills gap, knowledge-sharing, and competency development. ISC's mission revolves around ensuring that quality education and training opportunities are readily available, enabling Indigenous communities to take control of their educational systems. Within this framework, ISC supports and funds a wide range of educational programs and initiatives designed to empower Indigenous communities. These programs encompass early childhood education, research endeavors, knowledge exchange platforms, and competency-building initiatives. These efforts reach out to diverse Indigenous communities, ensuring equitable access to education and skill development opportunities.

For elementary and secondary education programs, ISC collaborates with First Nations to develop transformative models, such as regional education agreements, addressing education goals and advancing First Nations control over self-determined education services. These agreements identify First Nations-developed education strategies and commit to supporting First Nations leaders' vision for high quality, culturally and linguistically appropriate education for their students.

Furthermore, ISC is committed to strengthening the competencies essential for sustainable development within Indigenous communities. By promoting educational access and fostering skill development, ISC aims to empower Indigenous individuals and communities in economic development activities. Through these strategic endeavors, ISC is driving towards a future where knowledge and competencies are shared and leveraged for the betterment of Indigenous communities and the broader Canadian society.

Implementation strategies supporting the goal

This section is for implementation strategies that support the goal "Promote knowledge and skills for sustainable development" but not a specific FSDS target.

Implementation strategy: Continue support for elementary and secondary education for First Nations students ordinarily living on reserves
Departmental action: Sustain support for First Nations' educational autonomy, fostering high-quality, culturally relevant education on reserves. This involves collaborative initiatives, like regional education agreements, and partnerships with First Nations to address educational disparities between First Nations students and their Canadian counterparts.
  • Program: Elementary and Secondary Education
  • Performance indicator:  Number of First Nations under a transformative model (e.g. regional education agreement or school board)
    • Starting point: 206 (2022 to 2023)
    • Target: Maintain or increase results year over yearFootnote 1

How the departmental action contributes to the FSDS goal and target and, where applicable, to Canada's 2030 Agenda National Strategy and Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs):

In April 2019, Canada launched a new policy and funding approach co-developed with First Nations partners, to support elementary and secondary school education for students ordinarily resident on reserve with funding that is comparable to funding in provincial education systems, plus additional funding for language and culture, full-day kindergarten for children aged 4 and 5 and before- and after-school programming, and adult education.

  • Associated Canadian Indicator Framework (CIF) targets or ambitions and/or Global Indicator Framework (GIF) targets:
    • CIF Ambition: Canadians have access to inclusive and quality education throughout their lives
    • CIF Target 4.1.1: High school completion rate
    • GIF Target 4.1: By 2030, ensure that all girls and boys complete free, equitable and quality primary and secondary education leading to relevant and effective learning outcomes
    • GIF Target/SDG 4.2: By 2030, ensure that all girls and boys have access to quality early childhood development, care, and pre-primary education so that they are ready for primary education
Implementation strategy: Support capacity in Indigenous communities
Departmental action: Enhance economic and infrastructure capacity by supporting Indigenous organization-led training and post-secondary success for students which will enable communities to excel in infrastructure planning, management, and green economy prospects.
  • Program: Post-Secondary Education
  • Performance indicator: Number of funded First Nations, Inuit and Métis students who graduate with a post-secondary degree/diploma/certificate
    • Starting point: 2022 to 2023 fiscal year:
    • Target:
      • First Nations: Between 4,110-4,494 by March 31, 2025
      • Inuit: 50 students by March 31, 2025
      • Métis: Maintain or increase results year over year

How the departmental action contributes to the FSDS goal and target and, where applicable, to Canada's 2030 Agenda National Strategy and Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs):

Post-secondary student success is a key element in closing the socio-economic gap between Indigenous and non-Indigenous people, and improving capacity in Indigenous communities to support and administer their economic, infrastructure and environmental needs.

  • Associated Canadian Indicator Framework (CIF) targets or ambitions and/or Global Indicator Framework (GIF) targets:
    • CIF Ambition: Canadians have access to inclusive and quality education throughout their lives
    • CIF Target 4.2.1: Post-secondary education attainment rate
    • GIF Target/SDG 4.3: By 2030, ensure equal access for all women and men to affordable and quality technical, vocational and tertiary education, including university
    • GIF Target 4.4: By 2030, substantially increase the number of youth and adults who have relevant skills, including technical and vocational skills, for employment, decent jobs and entrepreneurship

Initiatives advancing Canada's implementation of SDG 4 – Quality Education

The following initiatives demonstrate how Indigenous Services Canada programming supports the 2030 Agenda and the SDGs, supplementing the information outlined above.

Planned initiative: Investing in education facilities

Through the Capital Facilities Maintenance Program, ISC invests in education facilities in First Nations communities, including new constructions as well as additions, renovations and major repairs to existing schools in First Nations communities. Investments in education facilities support the creation of quality learning environments that are safe and healthy, promoting better educational outcomes for students living on reserves. Schools are often the cornerstone of First Nations communities, providing students with a safe place to learn and grow, and acting as a gathering place for community events and cultural activities.

  • Program: Community Infrastructure
  • Associated Canadian Indicator Framework (CIF) targets or ambitions and/or Global Indicator Framework (GIF) targets:
    • GIF Target 4.a: Build and upgrade education facilities that are child, disability and gender sensitive and provide safe, non-violent, inclusive and effective learning environments for all
Goal 5: Gender Equality


Champion gender equality

ISC is dedicated to advancing gender equality and empowering women through a multifaceted approach. The department participates in educational campaigns to combat gender discrimination and implement tailored programs to combat gender-based violence, fostering safer and more inclusive environments. ISC actively supports women's participation in leadership roles, fostering mentorship programs, training opportunities, and support networks. ISC's commitment extends to advocating for and strengthening gender equality policies, collaborating with stakeholders, and aligning with international agreements such as the 2030 Agenda. Recognizing the nexus between gender equality and climate resilience, ISC's endeavors not only advance Sustainable Development Goal 5 but also bolster Canada's capacity to address climate change impacts. The eradication of gender-based violence remains a central element of ISC's strategy, underscoring the department’s dedication to fostering a more equitable and sustainable future for all.

Target theme:

Take Action on Gender Equality 

Target:

By 2026, at least 37% of the environmental and clean technology sector are women (Minister of Innovation, Science and Industry)

Implementation strategy: Invest in women's skills, employment, and leadership
Departmental action: Fund and support Indigenous women entrepreneurs through funding for the National Aboriginal Capital Corporations Association's Indigenous Women's Entrepreneurship Initiative.
  • Program: Indigenous Entrepreneurship and Business Development
  • Performance indicator: Number of micro-loans provided to Indigenous women entrepreneurs
    • Starting point: 0 (new program)
    • Target: 200 micro-loans over the three years
  • Performance indicator: Percentage increase in number of Indigenous women entrepreneurs accessing financing through Aboriginal financial institutions and Métis capital corporations
    • Starting point: 310 Indigenous women entrepreneurs received financing from National Aboriginal Capital Corporations Association's network in 2020-2021. This includes businesses owned 100% and partially by women.
    • Target:  Increase of 50% by 2025

How the departmental action contributes to the FSDS goal and target and, where applicable, to Canada's 2030 Agenda National Strategy and Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs):

ISC funds the National Aboriginal Capital Corporations Association's Indigenous Women's Entrepreneurship Initiative . The Initiative supports Indigenous women in various stages of engagement with entrepreneurship and invests in their skills, employment, and leadership to address the barriers Indigenous women entrepreneurs face. The initiative also provides anti-bias training to Indigenous Financial Institutions and business support officers to ensure the services and environment are inclusive and supportive of women entrepreneurs. The aim is to increase women's participation in entrepreneurship and increase women's financial independence. This in turn will hopefully contribute to increased socio-economic security and gender equality in the long term.

  • Associated Canadian Indicator Framework (CIF) targets or ambitions and/or Global Indicator Framework (GIF) targets:
    • CIF Ambition: Achieve gender equality and empower all women and girls
    • CIF Ambition 5.2: Gender equality in leadership roles and at all levels of decision-making
    • CIF Target 5.2.1: Proportion of leadership roles held by women
    • GIF Target/SDG 5.1: End all forms of discrimination against all women and girls everywhere
    • GIF Target/SDG 5.c: Adopt and strengthen sound policies and enforceable legislation for the promotion of gender equality and the empowerment of all women and girls at all levels

Target:

By 2026, reduce self-reported rates of intimate partner violence in Canada by up to 5% (Minister for Women and Gender Equality and Youth)

Implementation strategy: Prevent gender-based violence and support survivors
Departmental action: Collaborate with Canada Mortgage Housing Corporation on the implementation of the Indigenous Shelter and Transitional Housing Initiative to support victims of violence.
  • Program: Safety and Prevention Services
  • Performance indicator: Percentage of Indigenous women who report being a victim of intimate partner violence in the previous 12 months.
    • Starting point: 17% (2018)
    • Target: To be determinedFootnote 5
  • Performance indicator: Percentage of requests for overnight residence in ISC-funded shelters by women, children and 2SLGBTQI+ people that are met
    • Starting point: 78% (2020 to 2021)
    • Target: 100% annually

How the departmental action contributes to the FSDS goal and target and, where applicable, to Canada's 2030 Agenda National Strategy and Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs):

The Indigenous Shelter and Transitional Housing Initiative develops and funds shelters and transitional housing for those escaping gender-based violence including Indigenous women and their children, and 2SLGBTQI+ people.

The Initiative will result in a minimum of 38 emergency shelters and 50 transition homes across Canada, including in urban areas and the North. This work supports the distinctions-based programming to safeguard Indigenous women, children and 2SLGBTQI+ people from gender-based violence as outlined in the Final Report of the National Inquiry into Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women and Girls.

  • Associated Canadian Indicator Framework (CIF) targets or ambitions and/or Global Indicator Framework (GIF) targets:
    • CIF Ambition: Eliminate gender-based violence and harassment
    • GIF Target/SDG 5.2: Eliminate all forms of violence against all women and girls in the public and private spheres, including trafficking and sexual and other types of exploitation
Departmental action: Support services for Indigenous communities, women, children, and families across Canada, including First Nations, Inuit, Métis, urban, and gender diverse people through the Pathways Initiative, targeting the specific safety and well-being needs of the communities.
  • Program: Safety and Prevention Services 
  • Performance indicator: Percentage of recipient communities or organizations reporting that their project has improved community safety and well-being.
    • Starting point: To be determined (new program)
    • Target: 90% per year

How the departmental action contributes to the FSDS goal and target and, where applicable, to Canada's 2030 Agenda National Strategy and Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs):

The Pathways to Safe Indigenous Communities Initiative funds projects that support holistic Indigenous community safety and well-being initiatives that prioritize and address the safety and well-being of Indigenous women and girls. Funding provided through the Pathways Initiative aims to:

  • support Indigenous-designed interventions and Indigenous definitions of safe, secure and resilient communities;
  • support programs, services and interventions that address existing and emerging needs relating to the safety and well-being of Indigenous women and girls and 2SLGBTQI+ People; and address community safety and well-being needs that support reconciliation, resiliency, and capacity of Indigenous communities/organizations and their members, contribute to and promote a sense of belonging of community members.
    • Associated Canadian Indicator Framework (CIF) targets or ambitions and/or Global Indicator Framework (GIF) targets:
      • CIF Ambition: Eliminate gender-based violence and harassment
      • GIF Target/SDG 5.2: Eliminate all forms of violence against all women and girls in the public and private spheres, including trafficking and sexual and other types of exploitation

Implementation strategies supporting the goal

This section is for implementation strategies that support the goal "Champion Gender Equality" but not a specific FSDS target.

Implementation strategy: Support Indigenous, culturally-competent GBA Plus
Departmental action: Implement culturally competent GBA Plus (CCGBA Plus), an impacts-focused form of intersectional analysis that has reconciliation at the core and is informed by the work of National Indigenous Women's Organizations and Indigenous Peoples more broadly.
  • Program: Internal Services
  • Performance indicator: Increase quality and consistency of GBA Plus across all sectors and functional areas
    • Starting point: Inconsistent application and quality of CCGBA Plus across and between sectors and functional areas
    • Target: Completion of CCGBA Plus strategy implementation plan, including logic model and indicators, by March 31, 2024.
    • Target: Support sectors to apply CCGBA Plus by developing ISC-specific and function-specific CCGBA Plus guidance, guidelines, training, and other resources (2025 and ongoing).

How the departmental action contributes to the FSDS goal and target and, where applicable, to Canada's 2030 Agenda National Strategy and Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs):

Notable in the ISC context, GBA Plus goes beyond gender to think about all element of individual and community identity. ISC's GBA Plus Responsibility Centre provides capacity building supports, advice, and challenge function/review of all ISC programs and internal services. This is meant to ensure ISC programs and services are inclusive for diverse subpopulations of Indigenous peoples, that barriers to accessing programs or services are anticipated and mitigated, and to support inclusive advancement of the department's mandate and goals, including SDGs. ISC has recently established a GBA Plus working group with Indigenous partners to further decolonize the approach.

CCGBA Plus requires consideration of real and potential barriers and impacts, and pushes for mitigation measures to ensure equitable access and benefit for and between diverse groups of individuals, and communities.

Key activities include advice on collecting, using, and reporting on disaggregated data and qualitative evidence to assess and demonstrate impact on diverse subpopulations of Indigenous peoples, capacity building activities to support programs and internal services throughout the department, and challenge function to advise on all major initiatives requiring senior executive approval.

  • Associated Canadian Indicator Framework (CIF) targets or ambitions and/or Global Indicator Framework (GIF) targets:
    • CIF Ambition: Gender equality in leadership roles and at all levels of decision-making
    • GIF Target/SDG 5.1: End all forms of discrimination against all women and girls everywhere
    • GIF Target/SDG 5.2: Eliminate all forms of violence against all women and girls in the public and private spheres, including trafficking and sexual and other types of exploitation
    • GIF Target/SDG 5.5: Ensure women's full and effective participation and equal opportunities for leadership at all levels of decision making in political, economic and public life
    • GIF Target/SDG 5.6: Ensure universal access to sexual and reproductive health and reproductive rights as agreed in accordance with the Programme of Action of the International Conference on Population and Development and the Beijing Platform for Action and the outcome documents of their review conferences
    • GIF Target/SDG 5.A: Undertake reforms to give women equal rights to economic resources, as well as access to ownership and control over land and other forms of property, financial services, inheritance and natural resources, in accordance with national laws
    • GIF Target/SDG 5.B: Enhance the use of enabling technology, in particular information and communications technology, to promote the empowerment of women
    • GIF Target/SDG 5.C: Adopt and strengthen sound policies and enforceable legislation for the promotion of gender equality and the empowerment of all women and girls at all levels

Initiatives advancing Canada's implementation of SDG 5 – Gender Equality

The following initiatives demonstrate how Indigenous Services Canada programming supports the 2030 Agenda and the SDGs, supplementing the information outlined above.

Planned initiative: Support the implementation of system wide standards to reduce systemic barriers to gender equity and gaps in health services

The vision for ISC's Quality Improvement and Accreditation program is that First Nations and Inuit Individuals, families and communities access and manage accredited health services that meet their needs. It is a continuous process that facilitates access to culturally safe, high-quality health services that meet evidence-based standards and increases credibility and partnerships with regional health systems and peers.

Through investments in the Quality Improvement and Accreditation Program, ISC advances accreditation of health organizations, which can play a pivotal role in mitigating systemic barriers to gender equity by implementing standards that address the following issues identified in research findings:

  • Multiple studies have indicated that individuals feel unsafe within the healthcare system due to anti-LGBTQI+ bias, resulting in delays in seeking necessary care and treatment.
  • Many two-spirit and LGBTQ Indigenous Canadians have expressed concerns about discrimination based on factors such as HIV status, sexual orientation, or identity, which has deterred them from accessing healthcare services.
  • Additionally, alarmingly high rates of lifetime suicidal ideation and suicide attempts among two-spirit and LGBTQ Aboriginal populations underscore the urgent need for action.
  • Privacy and confidentiality concerns have been raised in small rural and on-reserve community health settings, particularly impacting two-spirit individuals.
  • Finally, a Trans research project discovered that 61% of Indigenous respondents had unmet healthcare needs, emphasizing the importance of addressing these disparities through accreditation standards.
  • Program: Health Systems Support
  • Associated Canadian Indicator Framework (CIF) targets or ambitions and/or Global Indicator Framework (GIF) targets:
    • CIF Ambition 5.1: Eliminate gender-based violence and harassment
    • CIF Target 5.1: Fewer women are victims of intimate partner violence and sexual assault
    • CIF Ambition 5.2: Gender equality in leadership roles and at all levels of decision-making
    • CIF Target 5.2: Greater representation of women in leadership roles
    • CIF Ambition 5.3: Canadians share responsibilities within households and families
    • CIF Target 5.3: Equal sharing of parenting roles and family responsibilities
Goal 6: Clean Water and Sanitation


Ensure clean and safe water for all Canadians

ISC is dedicated to ensuring access to safe drinking water and wastewater services in First Nations communities, addressing the challenges faced, despite Canada's reputation for having some of the world's safest drinking water. ISC supports First Nations partners through various initiatives, including a $5.6 billion funding commitment from 2016 to 2024 to upgrade water and wastewater infrastructure on reserves, enhance system operation and maintenance, and improve water monitoring and testing. ISC also collaborates with First Nations to address and prevent long-term drinking water advisories and has advanced reconciliation by approving the Safe Drinking Water Settlement Agreement. ISC continues to work with First Nations to develop innovative approaches, ensuring on-reserve water and wastewater systems are both safe and tailored to meet each community's unique needs.

Target theme:

Drinking water and wastewater

Target:

By March 31, 2026, 97% of Indigenous Services Canada-funded First Nations public drinking water systems produce treated water meeting prescribed bacteriological standards in the Guidelines for Canadian Drinking Water Quality (Minister of Indigenous Services)

Implementation strategy: Continue to take action towards eliminating remaining long-term drinking water advisories on reserve
Departmental action: Work with First Nations to take action in support of the commitment to eliminate remaining long-term drinking water advisories on reserves and increase efforts to ensure that long-term investments and resources are in place to prevent future ones.
  • Program: Community Infrastructure
  • Performance indicator: Percentage of on-reserve public water systems financially supported by ISC that have a low risk rating
    • Starting point: 57% (2019 to 2020)
    • Target: At least 70% by March 2026Footnote 6

How the departmental action contributes to the FSDS goal and target and, where applicable, to Canada's 2030 Agenda National Strategy and Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs):

ISC takes measures to support First Nations-led engagement processes, co-develop long-term strategies for sustainable drinking water and wastewater, and invest in water and wastewater assets, including their operation and maintenance.

Ongoing support is provided to First Nations to lift all long-term drinking water advisories affecting on reserve public First Nations drinking water systems financially supported by ISC.

The performance of public water systems on reserve is assessed annually and includes a risk assessment that evaluates an extensive set of factors that could lead to problems with the wastewater systems. Low risk ratings indicate that the systems operate with minor or no deficiencies.

  • Associated Canadian Indicator Framework (CIF) targets or ambitions and/or Global Indicator Framework (GIF) targets:
    • CIF Ambition: Canadians have access to drinking water and use it in a sustainable manner
    • CIF Target 6.1: All of the long-term drinking water advisories on public systems on reserve are to be resolved
    • CIF Indicator 6.1.1: Number of long-term drinking water advisories on public systems on reserves
    • GIF Target/SDG 6.1: By 2030, achieve universal and equitable access to safe and affordable drinking water for all
    • GIF Target/SDG 6.3: By 2030, improve water quality by reducing pollution, eliminating dumping and minimizing release of hazardous chemicals and materials, halving the proportion of untreated wastewater and substantially increasing recycling and safe reuse globally
    • GIF Target/SDG 6.5: By 2030, implement integrated water resources management at all levels, including through transboundary cooperation as appropriate
    • GIF Target/SDG 6.b: Support and strengthen the participation of local communities in improving water and sanitation management
Departmental action: Support all First Nations communities in ensuring they have ongoing access to a trained Community Based Drinking Water Quality Monitor or an Environmental Public Health Officer to sample and test the drinking water for potential bacteriological contamination.
  • Program: Public Health Promotion and Disease Prevention
  • Performance indicator: Percentage of First Nations drinking water systems that meet the Guidelines for Canadian Drinking Water Quality
    • Starting point: 94% (2019 to 2020)
    • Target: 97% of ISC-funded First Nations water systems meet bacteriological quality standards by March 2026
  • Performance indicator: Percentage of First Nation communities that have access to a Community-based Water Monitor or an Environmental Public Health Officer to sample and test drinking water quality at the tap
    • Starting point: 100% (as of March 31, 2009)
    • Target: 100% by March 31, 2024

How the departmental action contributes to the FSDS goal and target and, where applicable, to Canada's 2030 Agenda National Strategy and Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs):

The Environmental Health Officers and the Community-Based Water Monitors ensure proper sampling and testing procedures are undertaken in First Nations communities to determine whether or not water is suitable for consumption by identifying the presence of potential pathogens.

ISC collaborates with First Nations communities and provides funding for community-based water monitoring. By ensuring technical support and expertise, potential concerns can be identified, and recommendations can be provided to the Chief and Council for action. ISC also assists First Nations in monitoring drinking water quality, providing advice on safety and wastewater disposal, and reviewing infrastructure project proposals from a public health perspective. These measures contribute to understanding drinking water quality issues and their resolution.

  • Associated Canadian Indicator Framework (CIF) targets or ambitions and/or Global Indicator Framework (GIF) targets:
    • CIF Ambition: Canadians have access to drinking water and use it in a sustainable manner
    • GIF Target/SDG 6.1: By 2030, achieve universal and equitable access to safe and affordable drinking water for all
    • GIF Target/SDG 6.3: By 2030, improve water quality by reducing pollution, eliminating dumping and minimizing release of hazardous chemicals and materials, halving the proportion of untreated wastewater and substantially increasing recycling and safe reuse globally
    • GIF Target/SDG 6.5: By 2030, implement integrated water resources management at all levels, including through transboundary cooperation as appropriate
    • GIF Target/SDG 6.b: Support and strengthen the participation of local communities in improving water and sanitation management
Implementation strategy: Support First Nations control of water delivery
Departmental action: Support First Nations communities to assume control and delivery of water and wastewater services, including by transferring water and wastewater services in communities to the Atlantic First Nations Water Authority.
  • Program: Community Infrastructure
  • Performance indicator: Number of co-developed service delivery models based on community engagements within three years of initial investments
    • Starting point: 0 (as of March 31, 2021)
    • Target: 2 by March 31, 2024

How the departmental action contributes to the FSDS goal and target and, where applicable, to Canada's 2030 Agenda National Strategy and Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs):

In alignment with Article 23 of the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples, ISC is supporting First Nations and First Nations-led organizations to assume control of infrastructure service delivery.

These actions will strengthen local and regional capacity for water and sanitation management and contribute to the goal of safe and clean water for all Canadians.

  • Associated Canadian Indicator Framework (CIF) targets or ambitions and/or Global Indicator Framework (GIF) targets:
    • CIF Ambition: Canadians have access to drinking water and use it in a sustainable manner
    • CIF Indicator 6.b.1: Proportion of local administrative units with established and operational policies and procedures for participation of local communities in water and sanitation management
    • GIF Target/SDG 6.b: Support and strengthen the participation of local communities in improving water and sanitation management

Target:

By March 2030, 85% of wastewater systems on reserve achieve effluent quality standards (Minister of Indigenous Services)

Implementation strategy: Implement the Wastewater Systems Effluent Regulations on reserve
Departmental action: Implement the Wastewater Systems Effluent Regulations mandatory minimum effluent quality standards through secondary wastewater treatment and other federal activities.
  • Program: Community Infrastructure
  • Performance indicator: Percentage of on-reserve public wastewater systems financially supported by ISC that have a low risk rating
    • Starting point: 48% (2019 to 2020)
    • Target: At least 60% by March 2026
Departmental action: Support First Nations to design, plan, construct, operate and maintain wastewater systems that meet Wastewater Systems Effluent Regulations requirements on reserve.
  • Program: Community Infrastructure
  • Performance indicator: Percentage of wastewater systems on reserve where effluent quality standards are achieved.
    • Starting point: 59.8% (2021 to 2022)
    • Target: 85% by March 2030

How the departmental actions contributes to the FSDS goal and target and, where applicable, to Canada's 2030 Agenda National Strategy and Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs):

Untreated and undertreated wastewater (sewage) in waterways is an environmental, human health and economic issue.

The Wastewater Systems Effluent Regulations include mandatory minimum effluent quality standards that can be achieved through secondary wastewater treatment and are intended to help keep water clean for both human consumption and animals that live in or near the water.

By supporting First Nations to ensure that wastewater systems on reserve meet Wastewater Systems Effluent Regulations, Indigenous Service Canada will contribute to the goal of ensuring that water is safe and clean for all Canadians.

  • Associated Canadian Indicator Framework (CIF) targets or ambitions and/or Global Indicator Framework (GIF) targets:
    • GIF Target/SDG 6.3: By 2030, improve water quality by reducing pollution, eliminating dumping and minimizing release of hazardous chemicals and materials, halving the proportion of untreated wastewater and substantially increasing recycling and safe reuse globally
    • GIF Target/SDG 6.5: By 2030, implement integrated water resources management at all levels, including through transboundary cooperation as appropriate
    • GIF Target/SDG 6.b: Support and strengthen the participation of local communities in improving water and sanitation management
Goal 7: Affordable and Clean Energy


Increase Canadian's access to clean energy

ISC is firmly committed to collaborating with First Nations communities and other government entities to reduce the reliance on diesel-powered electricity within reserves. This commitment extends to actively supporting First Nations-led initiatives aimed at implementing renewable electricity sources such as solar, hydro, and wind power. Currently, approximately 200 communities across Canada depend entirely on diesel fuel for both heating and power, with the majority being Indigenous communities or those with significant Indigenous populations. These remote communities collectively consume over 680 million liters of diesel annually, with the majority of it being used for heating, a necessity in their challenging environments. Recognizing the environmental and sustainability challenges posed by this dependence on diesel, the Government of Canada is investing in various clean energy projects within Indigenous communities, facilitating their transition from diesel to cleaner and more sustainable energy sources. This initiative not only aligns with environmental goals but also supports the economic and social well-being of these communities.

Target theme:

Renewable and non-emitting sources of electricity

Target:

By 2030, 90%, and in the long term 100% of Canada's electricity is generated from renewable and non-emitting sources (Minister of Natural Resources)

Implementation strategy: Play a leading role to promote clean and renewable energy
Departmental action: Support First Nations efforts to transition from fossil fuel to clean, reliable and affordable energy systems through a combination of alternative energy projects featuring solar, hydroelectric, wind and others. Also support communities to improve and optimize energy systems through upgrades and energy efficiency projects.
  • Program: Community Infrastructure
  • Performance indicator: Number of efficiency or clean energy related projects completed
    • Starting point: 32Footnote 7 projects as of September 30, 2020
    • Target: 82Footnote 7 projects by March 2028
How the departmental action contributes to the FSDS goal and target and, where applicable, to Canada's 2030 Agenda National Strategy and Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs):

ISC is supporting projects to facilitate First Nations to transition from diesel to clean energy. These projects aim to reduce the community's use of diesel for heat and power so that a greater proportion of their energy consumption comes from non-fossil fuel sources.

  • Associated Canadian Indicator Framework (CIF) targets or ambitions and/or Global Indicator Framework (GIF) targets:
    • CIF Ambition 7.3: Canadians have access to clean and renewable energy
Implementation strategy: Support renewable energy deployment
Departmental action: Invest in renewable energy (for example, hydro, solar, tidal, wind and geothermal), grid modernization, and regional transmission projects to replace greenhouse-gas-emitting energy sources and support grid decarbonization.
  • Program: Communities and the Environment
  • Performance indicator: Number of First Nations communities located on reserves that rely on Indigenous Services Canada funded diesel for electricity generation
    • Starting point: 37 (as of 2021 to 2022)
    • Target: At most 24 by March 2025

How the departmental action contributes to the FSDS goal and target and, where applicable, to Canada's 2030 Agenda National Strategy and Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs):

Many remote communities rely exclusively on diesel fuel for electrical power and heat. Reductions in diesel reliance and dependence contribute to the sustainable management of communities and help to address challenges such as public health and safety concerns, environmental impacts (greenhouse gas emissions, contaminated sites), system blackouts, and load restrictions, resulting in the inability to keep pace with community growth and infrastructure needs (i.e. schools, housing, water). It also addresses economic development constraints due to limited diesel system capacity, fluctuating fuel prices, and rising fuel transportation costs due to increased winter road failures.

  • Associated Canadian Indicator Framework (CIF) targets or ambitions and/or Global Indicator Framework (GIF) targets:
    • CIF Ambition 7.1: Canadians reduce their energy consumption
    • GIF Target/SDG 7.1: By 2030, ensure universal access to affordable, reliable and modern energy services
    • GIF Target/SDG 7.2: By 2030, increase substantially the share of renewable energy in the global energy mix
Implementation Strategy: Work with partners on clean and renewable energy
Departmental Action: Advance development of clean and renewable energy through collaboration with Natural Resources Canada (NRCan), Crown-Indigenous Relations and Northern Affairs (CIRNA), Infrastructure Canada, Environment and Climate Change Canada, and the Indigenous Council formed under Wah-ila-toos.
  • Program: Communities and the Environment
  • Performance indicator: Percentage of Indigenous clients reporting easier access to clean energy programming
    • Starting point: 0% in 2021 when Wah-ila-toos was launched
    • Target: 90% by 2027
  • Performance indicator: Percentage of Indigenous peoples participating in engagement sessions that say it was meaningful and inclusive
    • Starting point: 0% in 2021 when Wah-ila-toos was launched
    • Target: 70% by 2027

How the departmental action contributes to the FSDS goal and target and, where applicable, to Canada's 2030 Agenda National Strategy and Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs):

As part of the Wah-ila-toos initiative (an NRCan initiative stemming from Budget 2021 $300 million Off-Diesel funding), ISC is contributing to SDG 7 by working with Natural Resources Canada and Crown-Indigenous Relations and Northern Affairs Canada to reduce dependence on diesel-powered electricity on reserve.

This interdepartmental initiative was gifted the name Wah-ila-toos following a sacred name gifting ceremony held by Grandmothers and Elders. The name Wah-ila-toos represents our collective responsibility to uphold our good relations with each other.

The Wah-ila-toos administrative unit has been established to streamline coordination with NRCan and CIRNA on engagement pathways and the development of a long-term strategy. This centralized single-window function has received over 450 funding requests, with new proposals arriving on a daily basis. A distinctions-based Indigenous Council was established to provide guidance and advice on programs and policy development. The Indigenous Council will also direct an engagement process and develop recommendations on a long-term strategy for the clean energy transition. In 2022-23, 159 agreements were signed (grants and contributions) as of March 31, 2023 with 46 under the Bioheat stream, 17 for Deployment, 37 for Demonstration, and 59 for Capacity Building.

  • Associated Canadian Indicator Framework (CIF) targets or ambitions and/or Global Indicator Framework (GIF) targets:
    • CIF Ambition: Canadians reduce their energy consumption
    • GIF Target/SDG 7.1: By 2030, ensure universal access to affordable, reliable and modern energy services
    • GIF Target/SDG 7.2: By 2030, increase substantially the share of renewable energy in the global energy mix

Implementation strategies supporting the goal

This section is for implementation strategies that support the goal "Increase Canadians' access to clean energy" but not a specific FSDS target.

Implementation Strategy: Streamline federal investments to advance clean, reliable energy in rural, remote, and Indigenous communities
Departmental Action: Work with partners to advance the Indigenous Climate Leadership Agenda to support the clean energy transition for diesel-reliant remote and Indigenous communities, support capacity and development of economically sustainable clean energy projects.
  • Program: Communities and the Environment
  • Performance indicator: Number of projects funded to support First Nations, Inuit and Métis communities' clean energy capacity and readiness
    • Starting point: One regional clean energy initiative stood up in British Columbia started in 2016, with renewal in 2021
    • Target: Four (4) new regional Indigenous clean energy initiatives by March 2024Footnote 8

How the departmental action contributes to the FSDS goal and target and, where applicable, to Canada's 2030 Agenda National Strategy and Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs):

With this Clean Energy funding, the Strategic Partnerships Initiative has stood up clean energy initiatives in Atlantic, Quebec, Alberta, Saskatchewan, and British Columbia (renewal), as well as entered into a partnership with Indigenous Clean Energy social enterprise. Additional funding is needed to support the development of Clean Energy Regional Initiatives in Manitoba and Ontario.

This indicator captures new programming under the Strategic Partnerships Initiative from 2021 to 2024. It will help to build capacity for local, economically sustainable clean energy projects in First Nations, Inuit, and Métis communities and support economic development opportunities.

  • Associated Canadian Indicator Framework (CIF) targets or ambitions and/or Global Indicator Framework (GIF) targets:
    • CIF Ambition: Canadians reduce their energy consumption
    • GIF Target/SDG 7.1: By 2030, ensure universal access to affordable, reliable and modern energy services
    • GIF Target/SDG 7.2: By 2030, increase substantially the share of renewable energy in the global energy mix
Goal 8: Decent Work and Economic Growth


Encourage inclusive and sustainable economic growth in Canada

The Government of Canada is actively working to provide Indigenous and northern communities with access to green employment opportunities through two key initiatives: the Indigenous Skills and Employment Training (ISET) Program and the Skills and Partnership Fund (SPF). These programs align with ISC's broader objective of achieving increased economic productivity through diversification, technological advancement, and innovation, with a specific emphasis on high-value added and labour-intensive sectors. By leveraging the ISET Program and SPF, the government aims to empower Indigenous and northern communities to participate in and benefit from the growing green job sector, fostering economic growth and sustainability while supporting the development of a skilled and diverse workforce in these regions.

ISC is committed to reconciliation with Indigenous Peoples and will continue to explore all available avenues for increasing opportunities for Indigenous businesses to participate in federal procurement processes, including co-development of a Transformative Indigenous Procurement Strategy.

Implementation strategies supporting the goal

This section is for implementation strategies that support the goal "Encourage inclusive and sustainable economic growth in Canada'" but not a specific FSDS target.

Implementation Strategy: Promote economic supports for Indigenous workers, businesses and communities
Departmental Action: Collaborate with provinces and territories through Regional Energy and Resources Tables to implement a mines-to-mobility supply chain strategy, increase the labour market participation of Persons with Disabilities, and adopt a sector-specific approach to workforce support. Additionally, ISC will test community-based solutions for national and regional priorities.
  • Program: Indigenous Entrepreneurship and Business Development
  • Performance indicator: Number of Indigenous-owned and controlled businesses being created or expanded in Canada
    • Starting point: 928 (2021 to 2022)
    • Target: 1,000 by March 31 of each year

How the departmental action contributes to the FSDS goal and target and, where applicable, to Canada's 2030 Agenda National Strategy and Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs):

As part of our commitment to inclusivity and economic growth, we actively support the Aboriginal Entrepreneurship Program (AEP), which seeks to increase the number of viable businesses in Canada owned and controlled by Indigenous people. The AEP funds a broad range of entrepreneurial pursuits and aims to build capacity, reduce barriers, and increase access to capital through strategic partnerships that will enhance economic opportunities for First Nations, Inuit, and Métis people.

The AEP provides $34.5 million in annual funding to support economic development for First Nations, Inuit and Métis entrepreneurs by offering non-repayable equity contributions to support entrepreneurs to start, expand or acquire a business, as well as diverse business services. It also supports loan interests, capacity building and training for Indigenous Financial Institutions.

Through collaboration with communities, Indigenous economic development organizations (such as the National Aboriginal Capital Corporations Association), and other internal and external partners, improvements are being made to accessing capital, promoting a climate of economic development within communities; and, ensuring full economic participation of Indigenous communities and entrepreneurs in the Canadian economy, according to community vision and needs.

  • Associated Canadian Indicator Framework (CIF) targets or ambitions and/or Global Indicator Framework (GIF) targets:
    • CIF Ambition 8.1: Canadians have access to quality jobs
    • CIF Indicator 8.1.1: Unemployment rate
    • CIF Ambition 8.5: Canadians contribute to and benefit from sustainable economic growth
    • CIF Indicator 8.5.1: Gross domestic product per capita
    • GIF Target/SDG 8.3: Promote development-oriented policies that support productive activities, decent job creation, entrepreneurship, creativity and innovation, and encourage the formalization and growth of micro-, small- and medium-sized enterprises, including through access to financial services
    • GIF Target/SDG 8.5: By 2030, achieve full and productive employment and decent work for all women and men, including for young people and persons with disabilities, and equal pay for work of equal value
    • GIF Target/SDG 8.10: Strengthen the capacity of domestic financial institutions to encourage and expand access to banking, insurance and financial services for all
Goal 9: Industry, Innovation, and Infrastructure


Foster innovation and green infrastructure in Canada

Sustainable and reliable broadband connectivity is a key basic element to improve the quality of life and the environment in First Nations communities. The First Nation Infrastructure Fund helps communities to upgrade and increase their public infrastructure, improving connectivity and access to high speed internet. This also helps to modernize community-level health services delivery (especially virtual care tools) in First Nations communities. The better the connectivity, the better the quality and range of virtual care services available to communities. Increased speeds will provide significant improvements in how First Nations participate in the digital economy, allow for the effective operation and maintenance of vital community infrastructure, and enhance the delivery of important socio-economic services. Through the eHealth Infostructure Program, improvements are being made to digital and virtual health care delivery to First Nations individuals, families, and communities.

The Land Use Planning Initiative supports First Nations communities in building capacity for effective land management, including the development and implementation of a land use plan that defines a clear vision for the community based on their priorities and strategies for the use and development of their lands and resources in accordance with their aspirations, needs and interests.

Initiatives advancing Canada's implementation of SDG 9 – Industry, Innovation and Infrastructure

The following initiatives demonstrate how Indigenous Services Canada programming supports the 2030 Agenda and the SDGs, supplementing the information outlined above.

Planned Initiatives: Improving connectivity and access to high speed internet

In addition to collaborating with Innovation, Science and Economic Development Canada on the Universal Broadband Fund, ISC invests in connectivity projects in First Nations communities through the First Nation Infrastructure Fund. Ensuring that First Nations have access to internet speeds comparable to other Canadians is a major step towards delivering on key government priorities, such as reliable public infrastructure and reconciliation.

Reliable high-speed internet is an essential tool for everyone. Increased internet speeds will provide significant improvements in how First Nations participate in the modern digital economy, allow for the effective operation and maintenance of vital community infrastructure, and enhance the delivery of important socio-economic services such as healthcare, education, and emergency and public safety services.

  • Program: Community Infrastructure
  • Associated Canadian Indicator Framework (CIF) targets or ambitions and/or Global Indicator Framework (GIF) targets:
    • CIF Ambition: Canadians have access to modern and sustainable infrastructure
    • CIF Target 9.3: By 2026, 98% Canadian homes and small businesses have access to Internet at speeds of 50 Mbps download / 10 Mbps upload, with the goal of connecting all Canadians to these speeds by 2030
    • CIF Indicator 9.3.1: Proportion of households that have access to broadband Internet service at speeds of 50/10 Mbps
    • GIF Indicator/SDG 9.1: Develop quality, reliable, sustainable and resilient infrastructure, including regional and transborder infrastructure, to support economic development and human well-being, with a focus on affordable and equitable access for all
Planned Initiatives: Improve the efficiency of health care delivery to First Nations individuals, families, and communities

The eHealth Infostructure Program aims to improve the efficiency of health care delivery to First Nations individuals, families, and communities through the use of digital health technologies. This facilitates data collection, communication, management, and utilization, and enables front-line care providers to better deliver health services. The eHealth Program supports and enables public health surveillance; health services delivery (primary and community care included); health reporting, planning and decision-making; and, integration/compatibility with other health service delivery partners.

Through investments in the eHealth Infostructure Program, ISC also aims to improve connectivity for healthcare facilities in remote First Nations communities. It aligns with Canada's Connectivity Strategy's objectives of "broadband speeds of at least 50 Mbps download and 10 Mbps upload" and "mobile wireless coverage is available where Canadians live and work, and along major road corridors". The program funds broadband connectivity installations, and works to increase and sustain better access to healthcare services in these communities.

Planned activities involve expanding connectivity deployments using newer technologies such as Low Earth Orbit Satellites (LEOs) where alternative means (e.g., fibre optics) are limited or not feasible.

  • Program: Primary Health Care
  • Associated Canadian Indicator Framework (CIF) targets or ambitions and/or Global Indicator Framework (GIF) targets:
    • CIF Ambition: Canadians have access to modern and sustainable infrastructure
    • CIF Target 9.3: By 2026, 98% Canadian homes and small businesses have access to Internet at speeds of 50 Mbps download / 10 Mbps upload, with the goal of connecting all Canadians to these speeds by 2030
    • CIF Indicator 9.3.1: Proportion of households that have access to broadband Internet service at speeds of 50/10 Mbps
    • GIF Indicator/SDG 9.1: Develop quality, reliable, sustainable and resilient infrastructure, including regional and transborder infrastructure, to support economic development and human well-being, with a focus on affordable and equitable access for all
Planned Initiatives: Supporting Land Use Planning Initiative

The Land Use Planning Initiative supports First Nations communities in building capacity for effective land management, including the development and implementation of a land use plan that defines a clear vision for the community based on their priorities and strategies for the use and development of their lands and resources in accordance with their aspirations, needs and interests. First Nations supported under this initiative are acknowledging the importance of integrating climate change considerations and effective infrastructure planning into their land use plans. For example, land use plans may include the construction of green energy infrastructure like wind and solar farms on reserves as well as policies designed to reduce or minimize greenhouse gas emissions in existing infrastructure and in construction, transportation, and industry activities on reserves.

  • Program: Communities and the Environment
  • Associated Canadian Indicator Framework (CIF) targets or ambitions and/or Global Indicator Framework (GIF) targets:
    • CIF Ambition: Canadians have access to modern and sustainable infrastructure
    • GIF Indicator/SDG 9.1 and 9.4: By 2030, upgrade infrastructure and retrofit industries to make them sustainable, with increased resource-use efficiency and greater adoption of clean and environmentally sound technologies and industrial processes, with all countries taking action in accordance with their respective capabilities
Goal 10: Reduced Inequalities


Advance reconciliation with Indigenous Peoples and take action on inequality

With the passage of the UN Declaration Act, the Government of Canada must, in consultation and collaboration with Indigenous peoples, take all measures necessary to ensure that the laws of Canada are consistent with UN Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples. ISC supports economic development through the Aboriginal Entrepreneurship Program (AEP), Indigenous Entrepreneurship and Business Development Program, and Communities and the Environment Program. The National Aboriginal Capital Corporations Association's Indigenous Women's Entrepreneurship Program Initiative supports Indigenous women in various stages of engagement with entrepreneurship and invests in their skills, employment, and leadership.

ISC's continued efforts for the co-development and introduction of an Indigenous health legislation can help build a legislative foundation to advance Indigenous health equity through improved access to high-quality, culturally-relevant, and safe care, as well as can help fully implement Joyce's Principle. Indigenous health legislation is being co-developed with First Nations, Inuit, Métis, partners, to ensure legislation is informed by the experiences of Indigenous people, guided by their objectives, and is free from anti-Indigenous racism. ISC initiatives to achieve this goal also include work to advance the implementation of Jordan's Principle and the Inuit Child First Initiative.

Target theme:

Advancing reconciliation with First Nations, Inuit, and the Métis communities

Target:

Between 2023 and 2026, and every year on an ongoing basis, develop and table annual progress reports on implementing the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples Act (Minister of Justice and Attorney General of Canada)

Implementation strategy: Implement the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples Act
Departmental Actions:

Contribute to the development of indicators and targets towards the implementation of Action Plan measures for which ISC has accountability, in consultation and cooperation with Indigenous partners, through Justice Canada's whole-of government, co-developed process, according to timelines and results to be co-determined. This includes measures related to the obligation to ensure bills and regulations are consistent with the UN Declaration.

Consult and cooperate with Indigenous Peoples on the review of and development of new/amended legislation, and regulations.

  • Program: All
  • Performance indicator: Number of laws and regulations that have been reviewed, developed, or amended for consistency with the UN Declaration in consultation and cooperation with Indigenous Peoples.
    • Starting point: New legislated obligation – June 2021
    • Target: 100% annually

How the departmental action contributes to the FSDS goal and target and, where applicable, to Canada's 2030 Agenda National Strategy and Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs):

The department supports the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples Act by building foundational pieces to support community-led control of programs and services and through the ongoing co-design and transfer of programs and services. All of these are critical to advancing self-determination and increasing equity—key objectives of the Act and of the reconciliation with First Nations, Inuit and Métis communities.

The Action Plan released in June 2023 provides a roadmap of actions Canada needs to take in partnership with Indigenous peoples to implement the principles and rights set out in the UN Declaration and to further advance reconciliation in a tangible way.

The Plan also commits to engage and consult with Indigenous partners to establish various implementation, monitoring and oversight processes.

  • Associated Canadian Indicator Framework (CIF) targets or ambitions and/or Global Indicator Framework (GIF) targets:
    • CIF Ambition: Canadians live free of discrimination and inequalities are reduced
    • GIF Target/SDG 10.3: Ensure equal opportunity and reduce inequalities of outcome, including by eliminating discriminatory laws, policies and practices and promoting appropriate legislation, policies and action in this regard

Implementation strategies supporting the goal

This section is for implementation strategies that support the goal "Advance reconciliation with Indigenous Peoples and take action on inequality" but not a specific FSDS target.

Implementation Strategy: Support economic development and entrepreneurship in Indigenous communities.
Departmental Action: Provide financial support, business advisory services, mentorship, and training opportunities for Indigenous entrepreneurs.
  • Program: Indigenous Entrepreneurship and Business Development
  • Performance indicator: Percentage of federal contracts awarded to certified Indigenous businesses
    • Starting point: 17.68% (2022 to 2023)
    • Target: 5%  by March 2026

How the departmental action contributes to the FSDS goal and target and, where applicable, to Canada's 2030 Agenda National Strategy and Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs):

ISC works in collaboration with First Nations to ensure an enabling regulatory and legislative environment for economic development on reserves. The department uses federal programming to advance economic opportunities in Indigenous communities, and increase economic capacity supports, including specialized training opportunities delivered by Indigenous-led organizations. By supporting a new Indigenous Tourism Fund, ISC aims to help the Indigenous tourism industry recover from the pandemic and position itself for long-term, sustainable growth. The department also aims to continue implementing the first Social Innovation and Social Finance Strategy to support social purpose organizations - including Indigenous economic actors - to access flexible financing opportunities that enable them to grow and enhance their impacts.

  • Associated Canadian Indicator Framework (CIF) targets or ambitions and/or Global Indicator Framework (GIF) targets:
    • CIF Ambition: Canadians live free of discrimination and inequalities are reduced
    • CIF Indicator 10.1.1: Gini Coefficient
    • CIF Indicator 10.4.1: Median household after-tax income
    • GIF Target/SDG 10.2: By 2030, empower and promote the social, economic and political inclusion of all, irrespective of age, sex, disability, race, ethnicity, origin, religion or economic or other status
    • GIF Target/SDG 10.3: Ensure equal opportunity and reduce inequalities of outcome, including by eliminating discriminatory laws, policies and practices and promoting appropriate legislation, policies and action in this regard
Departmental Action: Continue to implement Additions to Reserves as they advance reconciliation, fulfill legal obligations, improve treaty relationships, and foster economic opportunities. Additions to Reserve also allow First Nations to leverage their lands to attract investment, create employment and generate own source revenue.
  • Program: Communities and the Environment
  • Performance indicator: Number of Additions to Reserves completed annually
    • Starting point: 40 (2022 to 2023)
    • Target: 50 by March 2025

How the departmental action contributes to the FSDS goal and target and, where applicable, to Canada's 2030 Agenda National Strategy and Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs):

An Addition to Reserve is a parcel of land added to the existing reserve land of a First Nation or that creates a new reserve. Additions to Reserve also allow First Nations to leverage their lands to attract investment, create employment and generate own source revenue.

  • Associated Canadian Indicator Framework (CIF) targets or ambitions and/or Global Indicator Framework (GIF) targets:
    • CIF Ambition 10.4: Canadians live free of discrimination and inequalities are reduced
    • GIF Target/SDG 10.2: By 2030, empower and promote the social, economic and political inclusion of all, irrespective of age, sex, disability, race, ethnicity, origin, religion or economic or other status

Initiatives advancing Canada's implementation of SDG 10 – Reduced Inequalities

The following initiatives demonstrate how Indigenous Services Canada programming supports the 2030 Agenda and the SDGs, supplementing the information outlined above.

Planned Initiatives: Economic Reconciliation
  • Supporting the advancement of self-determination with Indigenous partners is essential to reducing socioeconomic inequalities.
  • Identifying and closing gaps requires capacity and expertise on the part of Indigenous governments, in areas such as strategic planning, results-based management, and the interpretation of socioeconomic data.
  • The Indigenous Governance and Capacity program provides funding for core operations of First Nation governments and supports governance capacity building initiatives. Planned reforms will look to ensure that these programs provide First Nation governments with sufficient, predictable and flexible funding to hire and retain the appropriate financial and administrative staff to support good governance, plan for the future, and advance their vision of self-determination.
  • Closing socioeconomic gaps is a central goal of economic reconciliation (PDF).
    • Program: Indigenous Governance and Capacity Supports, Community Economic Development, Indigenous Entrepreneurship and Business Development
    • Associated Canadian Indicator Framework (CIF) targets or ambitions and/or Global Indicator Framework (GIF) targets:
      • CIF Ambition/Target: Canadians live free of discrimination and inequalities are reduced
      • CIF Indicator 10.1.1: Gini Coefficient
      • GIF Target/SDG 10.3: Ensure equal opportunity and reduce inequalities of outcome, including by eliminating discriminatory laws, policies and practices and promoting appropriate legislation, policies and action in this regard
Planned Initiatives: Health Legislation

ISC's continued efforts for distinctions-based Indigenous health legislation will advance work towards improving access to high-quality, culturally-relevant, and safe health care for Indigenous peoples. To this end, regional and national First Nations, Inuit, Métis partners led numerous engagements within their communities on the vision for distinctions-based Indigenous health legislation. ISC then launched distinctions-based+ co-development processes, which focused on translating what was heard through engagement into proposed legislative options or policy approaches. ISC released a "Key Legislative Elements" document, outlining the proposed preambular recognitions, purpose, and legislative and policy measures, for input from partners. ISC continues to facilitate discussions and partner feedback on this important initiative.

  • Program: Primary Health Care
  • Associated Canadian Indicator Framework (CIF) targets or ambitions and/or Global Indicator Framework (GIF) targets:
    • CIF Ambition: Canadians live free of discrimination and inequalities are reduced
    • CIF Indicator 10.2.1: Proportion of the population reporting discrimination or unfair treatment
    • GIF Target/SDG 10.3: Ensure equal opportunity and reduce inequalities of outcome, including by eliminating discriminatory laws, policies and practices and promoting appropriate legislation, policies and action in this regard
Planned Initiatives: Jordan's Principle

Jordan's Principle and Inuit Child First Initiative (ICFI) work to minimize barriers and address gaps for eligible First Nations and Inuit children in Canada in accessing needed government services. The programs respond to the unmet needs of First Nations and Inuit children no matter where they live in Canada by providing funding to eligible children to access a wide range of health, education and social services they need, when they need them.

First Nations and Inuit children have experienced historical disadvantage due to Canada's repeated failure to take into account their best interest as well as their historical, geographical and cultural needs and circumstances. For this reason, substantive equality for Indigenous children will require that government policies, practices and procedures impacting them take account of their historical, geographical and cultural needs and circumstances and aim to safeguard the best interest of the child as articulated in the United Nations Committee on the Rights of the Child General Comment 11.

Jordan's Principle and ICFI fund a significant number of individual and group requests on and off reserve for a wide range of products, services and supports to improve opportunities for First Nation and Inuit children.

Through Jordan's Principle the Government of Canada contributes to reducing inequalities by assessing the provision of these services and supports through a lens of substantive equality, cultural appropriateness and safeguarding the best interests of the child.

  • Program: Jordan's Principle & the Inuit Child First Initiative
  • Associated Canadian Indicator Framework (CIF) targets or ambitions and/or Global Indicator Framework (GIF) targets:
    • CIF Ambition: Canadians live free of discrimination and inequalities are reduced
    • CIF Indicator 10.2.1: Proportion of the population reporting discrimination or unfair treatment
    • GIF Target/SDG 10.3: Ensure equal opportunity and reduce inequalities of outcome, including by eliminating discriminatory laws, policies and practices and promoting appropriate legislation, policies and action in this regard
Goal 11: Sustainable Cities and Communities


Improve access to affordable housing, clean air, transportation, parks, and green spaces, as well as cultural heritage in Canada

ISC is committed to fostering the co-development of infrastructure plans that target critical requirements within First Nations, Inuit, and Métis communities. One of the key initiatives in achieving this objective is the Community Infrastructure Program, which collaborates closely with provincial, territorial, federal, and Indigenous partners. This program serves as a cornerstone in delivering long-term, sustainable, and predictable funding to support affordable housing initiatives. By working in alignment with these partners, ISC not only contributes to meeting the Reduction or Elimination of Housing Need target for 530,000 households but also ensures that these communities have access to the vital infrastructure they require, promoting the overall well-being and sustainability of Indigenous and northern communities across Canada.

Target theme:

Affordable Housing and Homelessness

Target:

By 2028, reduce or eliminate housing need for 530,000 households (Minister of Housing and Diversity and Inclusion)

Implementation strategy: Support affordable housing and related infrastructure for Indigenous communities
Departmental action: Work to ensure long-term, sustainable and predictable funding to support affordable housing and related infrastructure and accelerate work to close gaps in Indigenous housing and infrastructure.
  • Program: Community Infrastructure
  • Performance indicator: Percentage of First Nations housing that is adequate as assessed and reported by First Nations.

How the departmental action contributes to the FSDS goal and target and, where applicable, to Canada's 2030 Agenda National Strategy and Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs):

On June 8, 2023, the Minister of Indigenous Services announced immediate funding in the amount of $287.1 million to address the critical need for safe and affordable urban, rural and northern Indigenous housing projects. In recognition of the need for immediate action, the National Indigenous Collaborative Housing Incorporated (NICHI) will deliver this funding through a proposal process for infrastructure projects that address immediate and unmet housing needs of Indigenous Peoples in northern, urban and rural communities. The process will prioritize those projects with funding shortfalls which are already underway and those which are ready to begin.

This delivery of immediate funding will proceed on a separate but parallel track to the Canada Mortgage and Housing Corporation's co-development work towards an Urban, Rural and Northern Indigenous Housing Strategy and Housing Centre.

Access to adequate housing and infrastructure is essential to developing healthier and more sustainable Indigenous communities. ISC will continue to support the construction and renovation of housing and infrastructure on-reserve, including supporting First Nations to eliminate all remaining long-term drinking water advisories on reserve and working with First Nations to establish legally enforceable safe drinking water protections, comparable to those in place in provinces and territories. The Department will also continue to support innovation and capacity-building in First Nations to support the gradual transfer of housing and infrastructure service delivery, aligned with the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples.

Since 2016 and as of March 2023, $9.89 billion in targeted funds have been invested, supporting 9,341 infrastructure projects in First Nations, including:

  • 1,206 water and wastewater projects;
  • construction, renovation or retrofit of 19,613 housing units;
  • 301 schools projects, including 68 new schools;
  • 283 health projects, including construction or renovation of 79 health facilities; and,
  • 1,667 projects to support other community infrastructure, including everything from roads and bridges to fire protection to cultural and recreational facilities.

A further $7.05 billion of targeted infrastructure funding will be invested from 2023-2024 onward.

  • Associated Canadian Indicator Framework (CIF) targets or ambitions and/or Global Indicator Framework (GIF) targets:
    • CIF Ambition 11.1: Canadians have access to quality housing
    • CIF Target: Reduce chronic homelessness by at least 31% by March 2024
    • CIF Indicator 11.1.1: Growth rate of people experiencing chronic homelessness
    • GIF Target/SDG 11.1: By 2030, ensure access for all to adequate, safe and affordable housing and basic services and upgrade slums
    • GIF Target/SDG 11.2: By 2030, provide access to safe, affordable, accessible and sustainable transport systems for all, improving road safety, notably by expanding public transport, with special attention to the needs of those in vulnerable situations, women, children, persons with disabilities and older persons
Goal 12: Responsible Consumption and Production


Reduce waste and transition to zero-emission vehicles

ISC holds custody of real property, leases space in facilities across the country, manages fleets of vehicles, maintains medical and scientific equipment, and procures a broad range of goods and services in order to serve Canadians. ISC also provides materiel management and greening government services to Crown-Indigenous Relations and Northern Affairs Canada. In recognition of the importance of Canada's lands and natural resources to Indigenous communities, and pursuant to the department's responsibility to implement the Greening Government Strategy, ISC is committed to lead by example with the reduction of waste from departmental operations and to transitioning to zero-emission vehicles. With ongoing operations in isolated areas across the country, ISC faces unique challenges and thus interesting opportunities to test new solutions for waste diversion in locations without recycling services, to demonstrate the performance and capabilities of new rugged zero-emission vehicles in isolated areas, and to expedite the deployment of vehicle charging infrastructure in or around remote communities that are supported by the department.

ISC's implementation of the Treasury Board of Canada Secretariat's Directive on the Management of Materiel systematizes waste reduction in materiel divestiture, and the department has developed green procurement targets to address waste reduction and zero-emission vehicle procurement targets mandated by the Greening Government Strategy. ISC started voluntarily reporting waste from some departmental operational facilities during fiscal year 2022-23, and the department collaborates with Public Services and Procurement Canada on waste management issues in leased facilities occupied by ISC across Canada.

ISC faced challenges with deploying zero-emission vehicles to support program delivery in remote/isolated areas with unpaved roads in the past, however the increasing availability of rugged zero-emission vehicles has enabled the department to deploy significantly more new zero-emission vehicles since 2020. During the 2022-23 fiscal year, ISC centralized fleet management within the department and concluded a comprehensive review of all on-road vehicles. ISC has also developed a decision tree to guide fleet purchases towards the hybrid and zero-emission vehicles for internal use starting during 2023-24, and is piloting vehicle telematics to assess and optimize vehicle usage and evaluate the entire fleet's potential for electrification. Future fleet review and emission reduction efforts are planned to focus on ISC's smaller fleet of other mobile equipment such as all-terrain vehicles, snowmobiles, and yard maintenance equipment.

Target theme:

Federal Leadership on Responsible Consumption

Target:

By 2030, the Government of Canada will divert from landfill at least 90% by weight of all construction and demolition waste (All Ministers)

Implementation strategy: Maximize diversion of waste from landfill
Departmental action: Ensure construction project general contractors track and disclose the amount of construction and demolition waste generated, as well as the amount diverted from landfill.
  • Program: Internal Services
  • Performance indicator:
    • Percentage by weight of construction and demolition waste diverted from landfill in Crown-owned buildings
      1. Mass of construction and demolition waste generated in the year = [X] tonnes
      2. Mass of construction and demolition waste diverted in the year = [Y] tonnes
      3. Percentage (%) of construction and demolition waste diverted = [Y/X] %
    • Starting point: 0Footnote 10
    • Target: Divert at least 90% by weight of non-hazardous operational waste from landfills annually by 2030

How the departmental action contributes to the FSDS goal and target and, where applicable, to Canada's 2030 Agenda National Strategy and Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs):

Actions that reduce the generation of constructions and demolition waste will help to reduce Scope 3 emissions for the production, transport and disposal of material. Diverting waste from landfill reduces landfill gas and transport hauling emissions. Material recovery via recycling reduces emissions for the extraction and production of virgin materials.

  • Associated Canadian Indicator Framework (CIF) targets or ambitions and/or Global Indicator Framework (GIF) targets:
    • CIF Ambition 12: Canadians consume in a sustainable manner
    • CIF Indicator 12.3.1: Total waste diversion per capita
    • GIF Target: 12.5 By 2030, substantially reduce waste generation through prevention, reduction, recycling and reuse

Target:

The Government of Canada's procurement of goods and services will be net-zero emissions by 2050, to aid the transition to a net-zero, circular economy (All Ministers)

Implementation strategy: Transform the federal light-duty fleet
Departmental action: Purchasing zero emission vehicles to reduce greenhouse gas emissions from conventional fleet operations.
  • Program: Internal Services
  • Performance indicator: Percentage of annual new vehicle purchases that are ZEV or hybrid
    • Starting point: 50% (2022 to 2023)
    • Target: At least 75% of new vehicle purchases each year
  • Performance indicator: Percentage change in Scope 1 GHG emissions from conventional fleet, relative to fiscal year 2005-06 levels
    • Starting point:
      • 2.247 kilotonnes of CO2 equivalent (kt CO2e) in 2005 to 2006
      • 1.742 kt CO2e in 2022-23 (22.5% decrease since 2005 to 2006)
    • Target: 40% reduction by 2025

How the departmental action contributes to the FSDS goal and target and, where applicable, to Canada's 2030 Agenda National Strategy and Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs):

ISC's annual vehicle procurement strategy is committed to sustainability, with a focus on reducing greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. Each year, all new purchases of light-duty fleet vehicles will be either zero-emission vehicles or hybrids. This commitment is part of our broader effort to significantly cut GHG emissions originating from our conventional light-duty fleet. Furthermore, we are actively collaborating with Natural Resources Canada to carry out a comprehensive Fleet Electrification Study, which will play a pivotal role in advancing our sustainable transportation initiatives.

  • Associated Canadian Indicator Framework (CIF) targets or ambitions and/or Global Indicator Framework (GIF) targets:
    • CIF Ambition 12.1: Canadians consume in a sustainable manner
    • CIF Indicator 12.1.1: Proportion of new light duty vehicle registrations that are zero-emission vehicles
    • GIF Target/SDG 12.1: Implement the 10-year framework of programmes on sustainable consumption and production, all countries taking action, with developed countries taking the lead, taking into account the development and capabilities of developing countries

Implementation strategies supporting the goal

This section is for implementation strategies that support the goal "Reduce waste and transition to zero-emission vehicles" but not a specific FSDS target.

Implementation Strategy: Strengthen green procurement criteria
Departmental action: Ensure all procurement and materiel management specialists are trained in green procurement (such as, the Canada School of Public Service course on green procurement, or equivalent) within one year of being identified.
  • Program: Internal Services
  • Performance indicator: Percentage of procurement and materiel management specialists trained in green procurement within one year of being identified
    • Starting point: 100% (2022 to 2023)
    • Target: 100% of procurement officers and materiel management specialists receive training within one year of being identified

How the departmental action contributes to the FSDS goal and target and, where applicable, to Canada's 2030 Agenda National Strategy and Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs):

Green procurement incorporates environmental considerations into purchasing decisions and is expected to motivate suppliers to reduce the environmental impact of the goods and services they deliver, and their supply chains.

  • Associated Canadian Indicator Framework (CIF) targets or ambitions and/or Global Indicator Framework (GIF) targets:
    • CIF Ambition: Canadians consume in a sustainable manner
    • CIF Indicator 12.2.1: Proportion of businesses that adopted selected environmental protection activities and management practices
    • GIF Target/SDG 12.7: Promote public procurement practices that are sustainable, in accordance with national policies and priorities
Implementation Strategy: Remediate high-priority contaminated sites
Departmental action: Improve the environmental condition on reserve lands by reducing contamination through remediation and risk management of contaminated sites.
  • Program: Communities and the Environment
  • Performance indicator: Percentage of high-risk contaminated sites on-reserve where remediation activities are being undertaken
    • Starting point: 18% (2022 to 2023)
    • Target: At least 29% by March 2024Footnote 11
  • Performance indicator: Number of contaminated sites that have completed remediation/risk management activities
    • Starting point: 14 sites (2022 to 2023, FCSAP Phase IV)
    • Target: 25 sites by March 2025 (end of FCSAP Phase IV)Footnote 11

How the departmental action contributes to the FSDS goal and target and, where applicable, to Canada's 2030 Agenda National Strategy and Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs):

Contaminated Sites on Reserve Program works directly with First Nations communities to assess and remediate contaminated sites for which a Crown liability has been established and documented. The Program reduces environmental impacts, makes previously unusable land available for community or economic development, and provides economic benefits and opportunities for First Nations.

Remediation and risk management of contaminated sites contributes to source water protection by eliminating groundwater contamination pathways which could impact drinking water sources. This contributes to the sustainable management of lands the environment and safeguards human health and safety.

  • Associated Canadian Indicator Framework (CIF) targets or ambitions and/or Global Indicator Framework (GIF) targets:
    • CIF Ambition: Canadians consume in a sustainable manner
    • CIF Indicator: 12.2.1 Proportion of businesses that adopted selected environmental protection activities and management practices
    • GIF Target/SDG 12.4: By 2020, achieve the environmentally sound management of chemicals and all wastes throughout their life cycle, in accordance with agreed international frameworks, and significantly reduce their release to air, water and soil in order to minimize their adverse impacts on human health and the environment
Implementation Strategy: Invest in the cleanup, decommissioning and closure of waste infrastructure assets, refuse sites and non-regulated dumpsites
Departmental action: Support First Nations communities through the First Nations Waste Management Initiative in undertaking new waste diversion approaches that meet community needs.
  • Program: Communities and the Environment
  • Performance indicator: Number of waste sites cleaned up, decommissioned or closed
    • Starting point: 8 (2022 to 2023)
    • Target: 60 by March 2028

How the departmental action contributes to the FSDS goal and target and, where applicable, to Canada's 2030 Agenda National Strategy and Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs):

Supporting First Nation communities to clean up, decommission and close waste sites and existing assets enables sustainable management of land and the environment. This allows the land to be utilized for future solid waste management systems or other land uses. Improved solid waste management helps protect the environment, safeguard human health and safety, and improves land management in communities. The First Nations Waste Management Initiative supports communities to undertake new waste diversion programs like recycling and composting. These efforts reduce the amount of waste going to landfill, thus lengthening the lifespan of these facilities.

While communities have had opportunities to access the First Nations Waste Management Initiative since 2016, there still remains a significant challenge in bringing some communities up to the waste management standards of comparable municipalities. Remote access, past substandard waste disposal, and lack of available services are still challenges that communities face. Supporting First Nation communities to clean up, decommission and close waste sites protects community water resources from contamination. This enables the sustainable management of land and the environment and safeguards human health and safety.

  • Associated Canadian Indicator Framework (CIF) targets or ambitions and/or Global Indicator Framework (GIF) targets:
    • CIF Ambition: Canadians consume in a sustainable manner
    • CIF Indicator 12.3.1: Total waste diversion per capita
    • GIF Target/SDG 12.5: By 2030, substantially reduce waste generation through prevention, reduction, recycling and reuse
Implementation Strategy: Invest in waste management programming on reserve
Departmental action: Work with First Nations to develop solid waste management approaches that meet individual community needs.

Activities will include:

1. supporting recycling, composting, and hazardous waste diversion programming, and

2. increasing community awareness.

  • Program: Communities and the Environment
  • Performance indicator: Number of First Nations communities with diversion programs (e.g. recycling, composting, waste reduction, etc.)
    • Starting point: 36 (2022 to 2023)
    • Target: 60 by 2027 to 2028
  • Performance indicator: Percentage of First Nations communities with adequate solid waste management systems
    • Starting point: 40.5% (2022 to 2023)
    • Target: 65% by 2027 to 2028

How the departmental action contributes to the FSDS goal and target and, where applicable, to Canada's 2030 Agenda National Strategy and Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs):

Supporting First Nation communities to reduce waste through education, awareness and capacity building activities. Funding supports communities to divert various streams (including recycling, household hazardous waste, compost, scrap metal, e-waste, etc.), and utilize a properly constructed waste facility.

Adequate solid waste management is defined as the ability of a First Nation community to divert household hazardous waste, divert other waste streams (i.e. paper, plastic, tires, electronics, etc.) and ensure all remaining residual waste is disposed into a properly constructed, managed and maintained waste facility.

  • Associated Canadian Indicator Framework (CIF) targets or ambitions and/or Global Indicator Framework (GIF) targets:
    • CIF Ambition: Canadians consume in a sustainable manner
    • CIF Indicator 12.3.1: Total waste diversion per capita
    • GIF Target/SDG 12.5: By 2030, substantially reduce waste generation through prevention, reduction, recycling and reuse
Goal 13: Climate Action


Take action on climate change and its impacts

ISC is addressing climate change and its impacts through activities mandated by the Greening Government Strategy, including the reporting of emissions and resource usage from departmental operational facilities, developing strategies to reduce emissions, and ensuring that departmental asset portfolios remain resilient to climate change. ISC started reporting emissions for 18 existing facilities in one province for fiscal year 2020-21, and the inventory of reported facilities expanded to 48 facilities across three provinces by 2022-23 through the identification of remaining custodial operational facilities. ISC's reporting of facility emissions to date provides crucial information required for emissions reduction planning and climate change adaptation assessments to be completed by the department during this Strategy.

Climate change is a global issue that is resulting in direct and indirect climate risks affecting the lives of people today and generations to come. ISC's climate change programs support effective research and action on climate change through supporting both climate mitigation and adaptation efforts. Climate risks to human health are increasingly becoming more visible as extreme weather events, wildfires, vectors, and heat waves spread across the country. The Climate Change and Health Adaptation Program (CCHAP), which is distinctly unique among adaptation programs, funds community-driven health research and adaptation actions, supporting First Nations and Inuit communities to identify areas of vulnerability and implement adaptation actions that are of greatest importance to them. By providing financial support, CCHAP creates an opportunity for First Nations and Inuit communities to effectively identify, assess, and adapt to the health risks of climate change according to individual community or regional expressions of health and health systems.

Target theme:

Federal Leadership on Greenhouse Gas Emissions Reductions and Climate Resilience

Target:

The Government of Canada will transition to net-zero carbon operations for facilities and conventional fleets by 2050 (All Ministers)

Implementation Strategy: Implement the Greening Government Strategy through measures that reduce greenhouse gas emissions, improve climate resilience, and green the government's overall operations
Departmental action: Ensure all relevant employees are trained on assessing climate change impacts, undertaking climate change risk assessments, and developing adaptation actions within one year of being identified.
  • Program: Internal Services
  • Performance indicator: Percentage of relevant employees involved in the management of facilities and conventional fleets trained on assessing climate change impacts, undertaking climate change risk assessments, and developing adaptation actions within one year of being identified.
    • Starting point: 0 – to be determined in 2023 to 2024
    • Target: 100% trained by 2024 to 2025

How the departmental action contributes to the FSDS goal and target and, where applicable, to Canada's 2030 Agenda National Strategy and Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs):

Trained staff can identify risk to critical program delivery, and develop responses to increase the resilience of operations to impacts of climate change.

  • Associated Canadian Indicator Framework (CIF) targets or ambitions and/or Global Indicator Framework (GIF) targets:
    • CIF Ambition/Target 13.3: Canadians are well-equipped and resilient to face the effects of Climate change
    • CIF Indicator 13.3.1: Proportion of municipal organization who factored climate change adaptation into their decision-making process
    • GIF Target 13.1: Strengthen resilience and adaptive capacity to climate-related hazards and natural disasters in all countries
    • GIF Target 13.2: Integrate climate change measures into national policies, strategies and planning
Implementation Strategy: Modernize through net-zero carbon buildings
Departmental action: Reduce greenhouse gas emissions from departmental operational facilities.
  • Program: Internal Services
  • Performance indicator: Percentage change in GHG emissions from real property from fiscal year 2005-06
    • Starting point:
      • 0.436 kt CO2e in 2005 to 2006
      • 0.134 kt CO2e in 2022 to 2023 (69% decrease)
    • Target: 40% reduction by 2025

How the departmental action contributes to the FSDS goal and target and, where applicable, to Canada's 2030 Agenda National Strategy and Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs):

Actions that rationalize the portfolio, share facilities, reduce the demand for energy or switch to lower carbon sources of energy will lead to reductions in GHGs from real property operations.

  • Associated Canadian Indicator Framework (CIF) targets or ambitions and/or Global Indicator Framework (GIF) targets:
    • CIF Ambition: Canadians reduce greenhouse gas emissions
    • CIF Indicator 13.1.1: Greenhouse gas emissions
    • GIF Target/SDG 13.2: Integrate climate change measures into national policies, strategies and planning

Target:

The Government of Canada will transition to climate resilient operations by 2050 (All Ministers)

Implementation Strategy: Reduce risks posed by climate change to federal assets, services and operations
Departmental action: Assess the risk of climate change impacts at mission critical assets and where there are moderate to high risks, develop plans to reduce the risk
  • Program: Internal Services
  • Performance indicator: Percentage of mission critical assets where the risk of climate change impacts is assessed
    • Starting point: 0% (2022 to 2023)
    • Target: 100% by 2024 to 2025

How the departmental action contributes to the FSDS goal and target and, where applicable, to Canada's 2030 Agenda National Strategy and Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs):

By assessing the risks of climate change impacts at mission critical assets, and developing plans to reduce the risks, the risk of disruption of critical service delivery to Canadians is reduced.

  • Associated Canadian Indicator Framework (CIF) targets or ambitions and/or Global Indicator Framework (GIF) targets:
    • CIF Ambition/Target 13.3: Canadians are well-equipped and resilient to face the effects of Climate change
    • CIF Indicator 13.3.1: Proportion of municipal organization who factored climate change adaptation into their decision-making process
    • GIF Target/SDG 13.1: Strengthen resilience and adaptive capacity to climate-related hazards and natural disasters in all countries
    • GIF Target/SDG 13.2: Integrate climate change measures into national policies, strategies and planning
    • GIF Target/SDG 13.3: Improve education, awareness-raising and human and institutional capacity on climate change mitigation, adaptation, impact reduction and early warning

Implementation strategies supporting the goal

This section is for implementation strategies that support the goal "Take action on climate change and its impacts" but not a specific FSDS target.

Implementation Strategy: Collaborate on emergency management and disaster risk reduction
Departmental action: EMAP (Emergency Management Assistance Program) actively collaborates with First Nation communities, provincial/territorial governments, and third-party organizations to deliver comprehensive emergency assistance services to on-reserve First Nation communities.
  • Program: Emergency Management Assistance
  • Performance indicator: Percentage of evacuees that have returned to their community within 3 months
    • Starting point: 82% (2022 to 2023)
    • Target: 95% per fiscal year

How the departmental action contributes to the FSDS goal and target and, where applicable, to Canada's 2030 Agenda National Strategy and Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs):

EMAP is designed to be adaptive to the evolving challenges resulting from emergency events, including those intensified by climate change. The program aims to be flexible, culturally sensitive, and responsive to the unique strengths and customs of First Nation communities. By recognizing and addressing the unique needs of these communities, EMAP helps build their capacity to adapt and cope with the impacts of climate change and natural hazards.

This includes offering funding for a wide spectrum of activities, encompassing mitigation, preparedness, response, and recovery measures. The program's design is rooted in flexibility, cultural sensitivity, and a responsiveness to the distinctive requirements of First Nations communities. EMAP not only provides financial support to provinces, territories, and non-governmental organizations involved in on-reserve emergency management but also supports diverse initiatives such as training, emergency planning, hazard assessment, and fire prevention. Additionally, it plays a crucial role in response and recovery efforts for a range of emergencies, including wildfires, floods, storms, and earthquakes. This comprehensive approach not only enables communities to address immediate emergency needs but also empowers them to "build back better" and proactively plan for risk mitigation, ensuring a more resilient and sustainable future.

The performance indicator percentage of evacuees that have returned to their community within 3 months supports Canadians to be well equipped and resilient to face the effects of climate change as well as strengthening resilience and adaptive capacity to climate-related hazards and disasters by reflecting both on the speed and effectiveness of emergency management through response and recovery efforts. A higher percentage signifies that the community's response and recovery mechanisms are efficient and well-equipped to handle the impacts of climate change-related emergencies. It demonstrates the community's resilience, indicating that they have resilient preparedness and mitigation measures and have necessary resources and support systems in place for a swift and smooth return. Timely recovery enables individuals to be repatriated back to their communities in a timely manner after an evacuation, which contributes to their overall resilience in the face of climate change challenges.

  • Associated Canadian Indicator Framework (CIF) targets or ambitions and/or Global Indicator Framework (GIF) targets:
    • CIF Ambition/Target 13.2: Canadians are well-equipped and resilient to face the effects of climate change
    • GIF Target/SDG 13.1: Strengthen resilience and adaptive capacity to climate-related hazards and natural disasters in all countries
Implementation Strategy: Invest in structural mitigation projects to protect First Nations communities from natural disasters
Departmental action: Through the First Nations Infrastructure Fund, ISC supports First Nations communities, band councils, tribal councils and Indigenous organizations in their efforts to implement structural mitigation projects, which will reduce the impacts of natural disasters and climate related extreme weather on First Nations communities (e.g. construction of dykes).
  • Program: Community Infrastructure
  • Performance indicator: Number of ongoing and completed structural mitigation projects
    • Starting point: 45Footnote 12 projects ongoing or completed as of December 31, 2018
    • Target: 200Footnote 12 by March 31, 2028

How the departmental action contributes to the FSDS goal and target and, where applicable, to Canada's 2030 Agenda National Strategy and Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs):

The First Nation Infrastructure Fund invests in infrastructure projects that modify hazards, including removing, reducing or eliminating them, segregating hazards by keeping them away from people and assets, and altering the design and construction of assets to make them resilient to potential hazards.

  • Associated Canadian Indicator Framework (CIF) targets or ambitions and/or Global Indicator Framework (GIF) targets:
    • CIF ambition 13.2: Canadians are well-equipped and resilient to face the effects of climate change
    • GIF Target/SDG 13.1: Strengthen resilience and adaptive capacity to climate-related hazards and natural disasters in all countries
Implementation Strategy: Support climate change adaptation across Canada
Departmental action: Provide funding for community-driven projects in First Nations communities south of the 60th parallel, and northern First Nations and Inuit communities. Funding will support the development of adaptation plans and actions that identify and prioritize the health impacts of climate change.
  • Program: Public Health Promotion and Disease Prevention
  • Performance indicator: Percentage of First Nation and Inuit communities covered by climate change health adaptation funded projects
    • Starting point: 43% (as of March 31, 2023)
    • Target: 61% by March 2027

How the departmental action contributes to the FSDS goal and target and, where applicable, to Canada's 2030 Agenda National Strategy and Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs):

Environmental Public Health Services also support SDG 13 – Climate action via the Climate Change and Health Adaptation Program which is designed to build capacity for climate change and health adaptation by funding First Nations and Inuit communities' efforts to identify, assess, and respond to the health impacts of climate change. First Nations and Inuit communities take action to minimize the health impacts of climate change.

  • Associated Canadian Indicator Framework (CIF) targets or ambitions and/or Global Indicator Framework (GIF) targets:
    • CIF Ambition/Target: Canadians are well-equipped and resilient to face the effects of climate change
    • CIF Indicator 13.3.1: Proportion of municipal organization who factored climate change adaptation into their decision-making process
    • GIF Target/SDG 13.3: Improve education, awareness-raising and human and institutional capacity on climate change mitigation, adaptation, impact reduction and early warning
    • CIF Ambition/Target 13.2: Canadians are well-equipped and resilient to face the effects of climate change
    • GIF Target 13.2: Integrate climate change measures into national policies, strategies and planning
Goal 16: Peace, Justice, and Strong Institutions


Promote a fair and accessible justice system, enforce environmental laws, and manage impacts

When potential adverse effects are identified, the Environmental Review Process ensures that appropriate mitigation measures and best management practices are considered in order to eliminate or reduce impacts on lands, waters, and communities. The Community Economic Development, and Communities and the Environment Programs consult and accommodate Indigenous Peoples and consider Indigenous Knowledge in impact assessment and energy regulation processes.

Implementation strategies supporting the goal

This section is for implementation strategies that support the goal "Promote a fair and accessible justice system, enforce environmental laws, and manage impacts" but not a specific FSDS target.

Implementation Strategy: Meaningfully consult and accommodate Indigenous Peoples and consider Indigenous Knowledge in impact assessment and regulatory processes
Departmental action: Determine whether proposed projects on reserve that are supported by ISC either through funding or an authorization (lease or permit), have the potential to cause significant adverse environmental effects through the Impact Assessment and Environmental Review Process.
  • Program: Community Economic Development, Communities and the Environment
  • Performance indicator: Percentage of impact assessments for which ISC provides input within established timelines.
    • Starting point: 100% (as of 2019)
    • Target: 100% annually
  • Performance indicator: Percentage of projects on reserve for which the required environmental review is complete.
    • Starting point: 100% (as of 2019)
    • Target: 100% annuallyFootnote 13

How the departmental action contributes to the FSDS goal and target and, where applicable, to Canada's 2030 Agenda National Strategy and Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs):

The review of physical activities and works occurring on reserve lands ensures environmental law requirements are met and address community needs. When potential adverse effects are identified, the Environmental Review Process ensures that appropriate mitigation measures and best management practices are considered in order to eliminate or reduce impacts on lands, waters, and communities. Engaging Indigenous communities in these processes further supports this goal in a meaningful way.

  • Associated Canadian Indicator Framework (CIF) targets or ambitions and/or Global Indicator Framework (GIF) targets:
    • CIF Ambition/Target 16.7: Canadians are supported by effective, accountable, and transparent institutions
    • CIF Indicator 16.7.1: Proportion of the population with high levels of confidence in selected institutions
    • GIF Target/SDG 16.6: Develop effective, accountable and transparent institutions at all levels
    • GIF Target/SDG 16.7: Ensure responsive, inclusive, participatory and representative decision-making at all levels
Goal 17:Partnerships for the Goals


Strengthen partnerships to promote global action on sustainable development

ISC supports Crown-Indigenous Relations and Northern Affairs Canada (CIRNAC) as the horizontal lead to advancing reconciliation with Indigenous Peoples. These efforts advance the 2030 Agenda and the Sustainable Development 'Goals' core theme of reconciliation. This work supports the United Nations Declaration Act Action Plan.

Initiatives advancing Canada's implementation of SDG 17 – Partnerships for the Goals

The following initiatives demonstrate how Indigenous Services Canada programming supports the 2030 Agenda and the SDGs, supplementing the information outlined above.

Planned Initiatives: Foster collaboration

ISC supports CIRNAC in its role as horizontal lead to advance the 2030 Agenda and the Sustainable Development Goals' core theme of reconciliation by providing input for Canada's Sustainable Development Goals Annual Report.

ISC works collaboratively with CIRNAC on shared interests to advance reconciliation and renew relationships with First Nations, Inuit and Métis by providing policy and program advice through joint committees at the Director General-level, Assistant Deputy Minister-level and Deputy Minister-level. Joint committee work is focused on intersecting policy and program areas including: closing the infrastructure gap; negotiating and implementing regional education agreements; addressing Indigenous community health care and mental wellness; advancing economic reconciliation with Indigenous partners; working with Provinces and Territories to advance reconciliation; and the United Nations Declaration Act Action Plan.

Supporting CIRNAC as the horizontal lead to advancing reconciliation with Indigenous Peoples.

  • Program: All
  • Associated Canadian Indicator Framework (CIF) targets or ambitions and/or Global Indicator Framework (GIF) targets:
    • CIF Ambition: Canada fosters collaboration and partnerships to advance the SDGs
    • CIF Indicator 17.2.1: Total official support for sustainable development
    • SDG 17: Strengthen the means of implementation and revitalize the Global Partnership for Sustainable Development

Section 5: Integrating Sustainable Development

Individual working

Indigenous Services Canada will continue to ensure that its decision-making process includes consideration of FSDS goals and targets through its SEA process. An SEA for a policy, plan or program proposal includes an analysis of the impacts of the given proposal on the environment, including on relevant FSDS goals and targets.

Public statements on the results of Indigenous Services Canada's assessments are made public when an initiative that has undergone a detailed SEA. The purpose of the public statement is to demonstrate that the environmental effects, including the impacts on achieving the FSDS goals and targets, of the approved policy, plan or program have been considered during proposal development and decision making.

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