Indigenous Services Canada: 2018 to 2019 Departmental Results Report

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Minister's message

The Honourable Marc Miller

I am pleased to present the 2018–19 Departmental Results Report for Indigenous Services Canada (ISC). This report, based on priorities outlined in our 2018–19 Departmental Plan, details the progress we have made over the past year as our new department continues to take shape.

As Minister of Indigenous Services, I am proud to lead a department that works collaboratively with partners to improve access to high quality services for First Nations, Inuit and Métis. Our work supports the self-determination of Indigenous peoples so that in the future, the services we currently offer are developed, governed, and delivered by Indigenous peoples.

As a relatively new department, we have set an ambitious agenda to accelerate the Government of Canada's commitment to a renewed relationship with Indigenous peoples, based on the recognition of rights, respect, co-operation, and partnership. Since its creation in 2017, ISC's work has focused on five key priorities: keeping children and families together, improving health outcomes, quality education, reliable infrastructure, and economic prosperity. Thanks to significant investments we are making progress. With Budget 2019, the total federal government investments in Indigenous programs are more than $17 billion in 2021–22, an increase of 50% compared to the year the Government was elected.

In 2018–19, Bill C-92, An Act respecting First Nations, Inuit and Métis children, youth and families, was co-developed with Indigenous partners and will come into force on January 1, 2020. The Act affirms the inherent rights of First Nations, Inuit and Métis to exercise their jurisdiction over child and family services; contributes to the implementation of the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples (UNDRIP); and establishes national principles such as best interests of the child, cultural continuity and substantive equality to help guide the provision of child and family services in relation to Indigenous children. In short, this law affirms jurisdiction over Indigenous children to where it belongs: with Indigenous communities.

We have also taken concrete steps to keep children with their families and connected to their communities and culture. We continue to implement the Canadian Human Rights Tribunal orders prior to September 2019 in relation to the over-representation of Indigenous children in care, including nearly doubling investments in child and family services funding to $1.2 billion annually and by approving nearly 500,000 health, social and education products, services and supports for First Nations children through Jordan's Principle.

In the key area of education, we are transforming education on-reserve through regional education agreements, tailored to the education goals and priorities of First Nations. On April 1st 2019, a new co-developed funding approach took effect, funding First Nations education on reserves at par with the level of funding in provincial education systems. On top of that, it dedicated additional funding for culture programming, and additional resources for full-day kindergarten for kids ages 4 and 5. In addition, we worked on distinctions-based post-secondary education strategies with our Indigenous partners.

Ensuring First Nations and Inuit have timely access to health services is critical. In the past year, ISC has strengthened services for children in the areas of Jordan's Principle, maternal child health and the creation of the Inuit Specific Child First Initiative. We are working in partnership with First Nations organizations to support them in identifying, designing and delivering health service solutions that better meet the needs of their communities, and are also working with First Nations and Inuit partners to reduce the unacceptably high rates of infectious diseases, including tuberculosis and sexually transmitted and blood-borne infections. We have also increased access to mental wellness teams, suicide prevention initiatives and we continue to support community-led strategies to improve mental wellness.

Throughout 2018–19, we continued to make significant investments in infrastructure. We've lifted 87 long term drinking water advisories since forming government in 2015, and we are on track to lifting all long-term drinking water advisories for public systems on reserve by March 2021. We have also made sustainable investments to prevent 143 short-term advisories from becoming long-term, to expand delivery systems, to build capacity of and retain local water operators, and to support regular monitoring and testing. Investments continue to be made to build, renovate and maintain other vital community infrastructure, including schools, housing and health facilities.

To further advance self-determination and empower communities, we worked with our partners to roll out 10-year grants that provide stable and long-term funding to 85 communities, with others in the works. This predictable funding provides communities with the stability to make strategic investments to achieve prosperity in the way that best suits them. We continued the co-development of a mutual accountability framework, aligned with the United Nations Sustainable Development goals. We continue to work with urban First Nations, Inuit and Métis partners to provide sufficient, predictable, long-term funding to help contribute to their economic growth and path to self-determination.

We have taken many steps forward over the past year, but there is still much more to do, in full partnership with Indigenous peoples, to achieve our important mandate.

I hope this report proves useful, and that it informs better policy and better outcomes.

Thank you.

The Honourable Marc Miller, P.C., M.P.
Minister of Indigenous Services Canada

Results at a glance

Total actual spending: $11,587,017,459
Total full-time equivalents: 4,210
Core responsibilities Actual spending Full-time equivalents
First Nations and Inuit Health 3,879,614,779 2,211
Individuals and Families 4,878,181,605 518
Community and Regional Development 2,682,659,160 828
Internal Services 146,561,915 653

Indigenous Services Canada (ISC) completed its first full year as a department in 2018–19. ISC was created to improve access to high-quality services for First Nations, Inuit and Métis peoples; support and empower Indigenous peoples to control the delivery of those services; and improve quality of life, and safety in their communities. ISC continues to advance work that closes socio-economic gaps and improves the quality of services for First Nations, Inuit, and Métis peoples, in partnership with them, and in a way that promotes self-determination.

The end goal is not only that the design, delivery and control of services – in all areas – are led by and for Indigenous peoples, but also that the Department will disappear over time. ISC will reach this end goal by promoting innovation, improving accountability to Indigenous peoples, taking a distinctions-based approach in the delivery of services and developing partnership models.

In 2018–19, ISC and Indigenous peoples worked together to achieve progress in the following 5 priorities, which are: Keeping children and families together; Establishing quality education; Improving health outcomes; Building reliable infrastructure, including housing and water; and Establishing a new fiscal relationship.

Keeping children and families together

Establishing quality education

Improving health outcomes

Building reliable infrastructure, including housing and water

Establishing a new fiscal relationship

For more information on ISC's plans, priorities and results achieved, see the "Results: what we achieved" section of the report.

Results: what we achieved

First Nations and Inuit Health

Description

Contributes to improved First Nations and Inuit health by providing or funding health programs and services to First Nations and Inuit communities, and by providing supplementary health benefits to eligible First Nations and Inuit individuals.

Results

To achieve progress in this area, the Department focused on the following 4 Departmental Results.

1. First Nations and Inuit individuals and communities are healthier

ISC continued to work with First Nations and Inuit partners to improve health outcomes for individuals and communities by enhancing access to quality health services while taking measures to address specific health gaps in key areas such as maternal and children's health, mental wellness and supports for youth as well as addressing infectious diseases such as tuberculosis and HIV. In 2018–19 the Department:

  • Established an Indigenous Women's Well-being Advisory Committee made up of representatives from national indigenous organizations, national indigenous women's organizations, the National Aboriginal Council of Midwives, the National Aboriginal Circle Against Family Violence, and the Society of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists of Canada. The Committee's objective is to help bring forward gendered perspectives into ISC policies and programs. The Committee identified women's sexual and reproductive health as a key area of focus.
  • Invested more than $41 million new funds for Aboriginal Head Start On-Reserve agreements for early learning activities.
    • This funding was accessed through the Indigenous Early Learning and Child Care Framework which was co-developed with the Assembly of First Nations (AFN), Inuit Tapiriit Kanatami (ITK), and the Métis National Council which significantly increased funding available for early learning and child care activities. The Framework and the collaborative work to implement it over time respond to the Truth and Reconciliation Commission of Canada's Call to Action #12 to develop culturally-appropriate early childhood education programs for Indigenous families.
  • Began 3 midwifery demonstration projects, one in each province of Manitoba, Saskatchewan, Alberta and a fourth is under development in the North. In regions without demonstration projects, smaller investments were made to lay a foundation to support Indigenous midwifery.
  • Completed the Continuum Approach to Oral Health Services for First Nations and Inuit, including measures for data improvement.
  • Increased the number of communities where oral health services are available, from 237 in 2016–17 to 303 in 2018–19; an increase of 66 communities during this time period.
  • Continued working with Inuit partners, provinces and territories to develop a long-term Inuit-specific approach to help better address the unique health, social and education needs of Inuit children.
  • As of March 31, 2019, approved 140,332 products, services, and supports for First Nations children and youth under Jordan's Principle, which was an increase of 63,441 over the previous fiscal year. Services can include but are not limited to: education supports; respite care; healthy child development programs and services; mental wellness; and other health services (e.g., dental and orthodontic treatments, pharmacy, vision care).

Signed a memorandum of understanding with 11 First Nations and the Province of Alberta towards fully implementing Jordan's Principle in November 2018.

  • Assisted First Nations children to access the products, services, and supports they need using the Jordan's Principle National Call Centre. From April 1, 2018 to March 31, 2019, a total of 5,376 calls were received, 1,852 of which generated a request for services.
    • The Department conducted a survey to assess client satisfaction with accessing services and supports under Jordan's Principle. Respondents reported the following:
      • Perception that child's well-being has improved (84%)
      • Satisfaction with all Jordan's Principle products/services/supports (92%)
      • Received all Jordan's Principle products/services/supports (81%)

Additionally, almost all respondents (99%) stated that they were treated with respect and dignity and 84% stated that their physical, emotional, social and spiritual needs were considered.

The Youth Hope Fund was launched in 2018 to provide a distinctions-based approach for First Nations and Inuit youth to develop and lead projects on life promotion and suicide prevention.

  • Increased access to mental health and substance use resources. For example:
    • the number of First Nations and Inuit communities that have access to federally-funded mental wellness teams increased from 86 to 344. A total of 52 new teams were created, bringing the total to 63.
    • the online chat counselling service portion of the Hope for Wellness Help Line was launched in May 2018. It was accessed almost 300 times by March 31, 2019.
    • the number of interactions with cultural support providers offered by the Indian Residential Schools Resolution Health Support Program (from 2011–12 to 2017–18) is more than 10 times the number of professional counselling sessions that took place.
  • Participated in the Inuit Public Health Task Group, which supported the development of the Inuit Tuberculosis Elimination Framework. The Framework was released by ITK in December 2018 as the next step in addressing the unacceptably high rates of tuberculosis (TB) among Inuit living in Inuit Nunangat. In 2016, the reported rate of active TB among Inuit living in Inuit Nunangat was over 300 times the reported rate of active TB among Canadian-born, non-Indigenous people.
    • Using this framework as guidance, the 4 Inuit regions developed region-specific action plans which reflect each region's priorities, needs and strengths. This approach also ensured that interventions in each action plan are informed by local TB epidemiology and health systems.
    • Provided advice to Inuit partners, using evidence-based tools, to enhance TB screening and treatment in high burden tuberculosis communities. ISC also provided technical expertise to Inuit working groups, which support self-determination and the development of region-specific targets and action plans.

New funding approaches were identified this fiscal year, that allow for the allocation of resources based on the needs and priorities of Inuit Nunangat, rather than on the federal role in programming north or south of 60°.

  • Continued to make demonstrable progress towards the United Nations' 90-90-90 HIV treatment targets, through initiatives such as the "Know Your Status" (KYS) program in Saskatchewan. Under this program, the number of First Nations communities with access to full or partial KYS programs increased from 26 to 73 communities between 2016–17 and 2018–19 in this province.
2. First Nations and Inuit have improved access to supplementary health benefits

The Department continued to fund a range of medically necessary health-related goods and services, which are not otherwise available to First Nations and Inuit through private plans or other programs. Supplementary health benefits include prescription and over-the-counter medication, dental care, vision care, medical supplies and equipment, mental health counselling, as well as medical transportation for clients to access medically necessary health services that are not otherwise available on reserve or in the community of residence. In 2018–19, ISC:

  • Provided coverage of mental health counselling benefits, expanded through Budget 2017. From 2017–18 to 2018–19, Non-Insured Health Benefits (NIHB) mental health counselling expenditures increased by 29%.
  • Increased service fees paid to professional mental health providers and provided $5.7 million in 2018–19 for traditional healing services in support of mental health (to support a range of service delivery and preparation activities).
  • Started providing coverage for escorts (typically a partner or family member) to accompany pregnant women traveling for childbirth. In 2018–19, there were over 1,094 clients who traveled for childbirth. Of those, 92.4% (1,011) traveled with at least one escort.
  • Began a comprehensive inventory and analysis of current dental contracts and other funding arrangements with communities, with the intent of identifying challenges and opportunities for increasing the number of such arrangements in the next fiscal year.
    • Additionally, the Department announced increased coverage for fluoride treatment (clients of all ages are now eligible) in the December 2018 NIHB Program Update, as well as posting on-line and promoting through various Government of Canada (GC) social media channels (Healthy FN/I Facebook, GC Indigenous twitter account).
  • Published quarterly NIHB Updates to share plain-language benefit information and keep clients, providers, and stakeholders informed of benefit coverage changes. They are published on the website, promoted on GC social media, and shared widely by email. Working with NIHB Navigators, ISC developed a printable "Dental Client Quick Reference Sheet" to share information on NIHB dental benefits and oral health. The NIHB Drug Exception Centre began taking calls from clients to answer questions about their medication benefits and received over 7,000 calls in 2018.
  • Moved 2 recipientsFootnote 1 into more flexible funding agreements, as part of a framework for increasing flexibility for recipients under NIHB funding arrangements. Regional Contribution Agreement teams were put in place across regions and will support additional recipients being moved to more flexible arrangements next fiscal year. In addition, other innovative service delivery arrangements supported this year included:
    • expanding after-hours call-center supports provided to clients by a First Nations organization to include both medical transportation and mental health counseling
    • increasing service provision by physicians travelling to 4 Northern First Nations communities, serving a population of over 14,000 NIHB clients
    • increasing First Nations control of the delivery of mental health counselling benefits through 7 First Nations communities and Tribal Councils in Northern Saskatchewan
  • Hosted regular bilateral meetings with representatives of the Inuit Tapiriit Kanatami to ensure the NIHB reflects the needs of First Nations and Inuit. In 2018–19, the NIHB Program produced an Inuit NIHB Client Data Report and an NIHB Progress List for the National Inuit Committee on Health. The following benefits offered under this Program were also reviewed, as part of the ongoing NIHB Joint Review being undertaken with the Assembly of First Nations, and implementation plans were either approved or in development:
    • Dental and Vision Care
    • Pharmacy
    • Medical Supplies and Equipment
  • Worked closely with Crown-Indigenous Relations and Northern Affairs (CIRNAC) to provide coverage to new clients that have become eligible for benefits as a result of legislative amendments to the Indian Act (former Bill S-3) and to the Qalipu Mi'kmaq First Nation Act.
3. First Nations and Inuit health is supported by modern infrastructure and greater Indigenous governance

Modern infrastructure is necessary to ensure First Nations and Inuit patients receive the best care possible. The Department supports the development and delivery of health programs and services through investments in health facilities infrastructure, with the lens that First Nations and Inuit communities know best what their needs and requirements are. ISC collaborates with partners with a goal of eventually becoming a funder and governance partner, without having a role in programs design and delivery. In 2018–19, ISC:

  • Advanced alternative health service delivery models agreements with Quebec and Saskatchewan.
    • continued to negotiate Tripartite Memorandums of Understanding between the Federal and Provincial Governments and the Assembly of First Nations (Quebec-Labrador), through which the partners have committed to collaborating in the development of a new health and social services governance structure
    • on May 18, 2018, Onion Lake Cree Nation in Saskatchewan and the Government of Canada signed a Memorandum of Understanding committing the partners to developing a new funding arrangement that reflects the Treaty relationship with the Crown
  • Progressed on development of new models of health transformation and possible devolution in Ontario with Nishnawbe Aski Nation, Anishinabek Nation, Six Nations and Treaty 3. Specifically, in 2018–19, ongoing support was provided to advance the design and development of First Nations-driven solutions, by supporting community engagement and the establishment of implementation and governance structures to guide this work.
    • Progress made also included the Matawa Tribal Council assuming environmental public health services and current plans for nursing devolution
    • Progress also included Fort Frances Tribal Area Health Services, building on successful devolution of nursing services 2 years ago and current plans for the devolution of environmental public health and health system transformation
  • Continued to explore opportunities for new approaches in Atlantic Canada and the Alberta Region. For example:
    • Phased out the closure of the Labrador Health Secretariat (created in 2001 to cultivate community capacity to deliver health programs) which has marked a shift toward a Nation-to-Nation relationship and has also resulted in an increase in a trained workforce within Labrador Innu communities to deliver healing programs and services
    • Signed, in November 2018, a memorandum of understanding (MOU) on Jordan's Principle with the province of Alberta and the First Nations Health Consortium to co-ordinate services in Alberta, address a series of gaps, and share information to effectively facilitate First Nations children's access to the services they require
  • Reached significant milestones in the Department's governance and funding partnership with First Nations in British Columbia. In May 2018, a tripartite Memorandum of Understanding was signed between the Federal and Provincial Governments and the First Nations Health Council in BC, through which the partners have committed to establishing a new approach for federal and provincial investments in mental health and wellness services. This new funding approach will allow First Nations to plan, design, and deliver a continuum of community-based mental health and wellness services based on their health plans and priorities.
  • Collaborated with the First Nations Health Authority, Health Canada, and the Public Health Agency of Canada in the development of a Declaration of Commitment to Advance Cultural Safety and Humility in Health and Wellness Services and Organizations. Through this Declaration, the partners have committed to work together to promote the principles of cultural safety and humility within the health care system in British Columbia and to support work in advancing this issue nationally.
  • As a result of Budget 2016 investments in health infrastructure, completed, as of March 31, 2019, a total of 178 health facility infrastructure projects.
4. Responsive primary care services are available to First Nations and Inuit

Primary care services are crucial to improving the health status of First Nations and Inuit individuals, families and communities, especially in cases where services would otherwise be hours away. In 2018–19, ISC:

  • Increased to 33% (up from 25% in 2015–16) the number of communities receiving clinical and client care services that have access (remote or on the ground) to a nurse practitioner.
  • Conducted a regional scan of medication access issues in remote communities and identified potential mitigating measures as part of the AFN-NIHB Joint Pharmacy Review. Budget 2017 also provided funding to improve client access to pharmacy services in remote communities.
  • Enhanced the delivery of primary care in northern communities in Manitoba, by providing health transformation funding to the Manitoba Keewatinowi Okimakanak (MKO). This investment includes the development of a Winnipeg-based physician clinic that recruits physicians to deploy to northern communities. This model will provide more local access to physicians for people living in northern, remote communities and enhance continuity of care for people travelling for medical appointments.
  • Budget 2017 funding provided $3.8 million with $500,000 allocated to year 2 (2018–19) to improve client access to pharmacy services in remote communities. Results in 2018–19 include:
    • In Quebec, regional first responder initiatives are underway in 3 communities to provide equitable access to First Responder services or emergency transportation. In 2018–19, funding covered the costs of salaries, gas, maintenance, registrations, insurance, and uniforms
    • In the Ontario Region, ISC worked with internal and external partners to develop strategies for the integration of community paramedics into community interdisciplinary health care teams
    • The Manitoba Region began the initial phase of an outpatient dispensing model allowing for clients to have improved access to medication in 2 pilot sites
    • Ongoing funding was provided to Alberta Region to support their tele-pharmacy initiative and to hire a part time Emergency Medical Responder (EMR) Coordinator to mobilize local community members as EMRs and augment with contracted paramedics when needed. An additional paramedic was also provided for one remote and isolated First Nations community
  • Contributed to workforce stabilization, through the development of the ISC Nursing Services Response Centre. The Centre offered a single-window approach for supports to front line nurses. The Nursing Retention and Recruitment Strategy also assisted the Department in maintaining a qualified pool of health professionals through national recruitment efforts. In addition, front-line nurses met both of the following targets for mandatory training compliance:
    • existing nurses have obtained recertification in each of the 5 mandatory training courses prior to their expiration (80% target for each course)
    • newly hired nurses have successfully completed all 5 mandatory training courses prior to being deployed to First Nations communities (100% target for all newly hired)
  • Provided home care nurses, in all regions, with training through Pallium Canada to enhance capacity to deliver culturally-appropriate palliative care services early, effectively and compassionately.
Results achieved
Departmental results Performance indicators Target Date to achieve target Actual results
First Nations and Inuit individuals and communities are healthier % of First Nations and Inuit adults who reported being in "excellent" or "very good" health First Nations and Inuit: 50% March 2028 First Nations: 37.8%a

Inuit:41.2%b
First Nations and Inuit life expectancy at birth First Nations
Males: 79.3
Females: 81.7

Inuit
Males: 73.5
Females: 76.4
March 2028 First Nations
Males: 76.4
Females: 79.3

Inuit
Males: 70.8
Females: 74.0
% of First Nations and Inuit communities with access to mental wellness team services 34% March 2019 50%
% of the recommended number of sampling weeks that public water systems in First Nations communities were monitored for bacteria 82% March 2022 84%
First Nations and Inuit have improved access to supplementary health benefits % of clients who received at least one non-insured health benefit per year 70% or more March 2019 72.6%
% of clientsc who received preventive dental services 69%–73% March 2019 71.3%
First Nations and Inuit health is supported by modern infrastructure and Indigenous governance % of nursing stations, health centres and treatment centres with telehealth access 95% March 2019 99%
Number of clinical telehealth sessions delivered to First Nations clients 13,000 March 2022 14,092
% of health facilities that have been newly constructed or undergone major renovations in the past 10 years 20%–30% March 2024 13%d
% of First Nations and Inuit communities that control the design, delivery and management of health programs and services 78% to 83% March 2019 80%
Responsive primary care services are available to First Nations and Inuit Number of approved requests for products and services to support First Nations children under the Jordan's Principle 185,000 March 31, 2020 140,332e
% of communities receiving clinical and client care services in remote and isolated communities with access to nurse practitioner services 27% March 2019 33%
% of First Nations on reserve who reported needing services at home for a physical or mental condition and were receiving these services 49% 2023–24 48.7%
% of First Nations adults in communities where clinical and client care services are delivered who rate the quality of health services in their community as either excellent or very goodf 52% 2023–24 45.7%
a The result is from the 2015−16 Regional Health Survey.
b The result is from the 2017 Aboriginal Peoples Survey.
c The term "clients" in this context refers to "dental claimants".
d The result represents the percentage of health facilities that have been newly constructed between 2008 and 2018, as well as those health facilities that have received major renovations between 2016 and 2018. This number will be revised to include the percentage of health facilities that have undergone major renovations between 2008 and 2016 once this information is available.
eAs of March 31, 2019.
f Please note that the question from the Regional Health Survey asks about "excellent or good". The indicator was adjusted in the 2019–20 Departmental Plan.
Budgetary financial resources (dollars)
2018–19
Main Estimates
2018–19
Planned spending
2018–19
Total authorities available for use
2018–19
Actual spending (authorities used)
2018–19
Difference
(actual spending minus planned spending)
3,092,364,290 3,092,364,290 4,091,002,957 3,879,614,779 787,250,489

The difference between 2018–19 planned spending and actual spending primarily reflects incremental funding provided through Supplementary Estimates, Budget Implementation Vote, and Treasury Board Vote 10 for:

  • health, social and education services and support for First Nations children under Jordan's Principle (+$323.3 million)
  • Non-Insured Health Benefits for First Nations and Inuit (Budget 2018) and sex-based inequities in Indian status registration (+$204.7 million)
  • the Clinical and Client Care Program and e-Health Infostructure Program (Budget 2018) (+$89.3 million)
  • increased health support for survivors of Indian Residential Schools and their families (Budget 2018) (+$74.5 million)
  • Indigenous Early Learning and Child Care Framework (+$71.4 million)
  • building healthier First Nations and Inuit communities (+$55.5 million)
  • health infrastructure projects on-reserve (+$49.4 million)
  • addictions treatment and prevention services in First Nations and Inuit communities (Budget 2018) (+$39.8 million)
  • First Nations Water and Wastewater Enhanced Program and to monitor and test on-reserve drinking water (+$26.6 million)
  • health transformation (Budget 2018) (+$20.8 million)
  • infrastructure projects in Indigenous communities (+$20.1 million)
  • Inuit health (Budget 2018) (+$12.8 million)
  • recommendations in the National Inquiry into Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women and Girls Interim Report (+$10.5 million)

The increase in funding is also offset by the actual expenditures that were lower than expected due to the demand-driven nature of the programs, such as:

  • Non-Insured Health Benefits for First Nations and Inuit (Budget 2018) (-$102.4 million)
  • Health, social and education services and support for First Nations children under Jordan's Principle (-$101.6 million)
Human resources (full-time equivalents)
2018–19
Planned full-time equivalents
2018–19
Actual full-time equivalents
2018–19
Difference
(actual full-time equivalents minus planned full-time equivalents)
1,985 2,211 226

The difference between 2018–19 planned FTEs and actual FTEs primarily reflects an incremental increase in resources provided through Supplementary Estimates, Budget Implementation Vote, and Treasury Board Vote 10 to support the government priorities in First Nations and Inuit Health programs and services mainly through:

  • First Nations Water and Wastewater Enhanced Program and to monitor and test on-reserve drinking water
  • increased health support for survivors of Indian Residential Schools and their families (Budget 2018)
  • building healthier First Nations and Inuit communities
  • Indigenous Early Learning and Child Care Framework
  • health infrastructure projects on-reserve

Financial, human resources and performance information for ISC's Program Inventory is available in the GC InfoBase.

Individuals and Families

Description

Support the well-being of Indigenous children, individuals and families on reserve and in urban centres through the delivery of services. This includes funding essential to First Nations for: elementary, secondary, and post-secondary students; culturally-appropriate services for children in-care; family violence protection and prevention services; support for seniors, adults, and children with chronic diseases and disabilities; and income assistance for individuals and families in financial need. Also included are programs and services for Indigenous peoples transitioning to or living in urban centres.

Results

To achieve progress in this area, the Department focused on the following 3 Departmental Results.

1. Indigenous students receive an inclusive and high quality education

Between 2006 and 2016, the proportion of Registered IndiansFootnote 2 living on reserve aged 18 to 24 who have attained a high school education increased by 10 percentage points. However, while educational outcomes for Registered Indians on reserve are improving, there remains a persistent gap. In 2016, the proportion of on-reserve Registered Indians, aged 18-24, who had at least attained a high school education, was half of that of their non-Indigenous counterparts (44% compared to 88%). The Department recognizes that the persistent gap in educational attainment indicates a need to fundamentally rethink how education programming is managed and funded by the Federal Government. In 2018–19, to continue to improve current and future program delivery for Indigenous students, ISC in collaboration with Indigenous partners:

  • Established a new policy framework for First Nations elementary and secondary education. This new co-developed policy and funding approach for First Nations kindergarten to grade 12 education on reserves began April 1, 2019. This new approach includes:
    • replacing proposal-based programs with access to predictable core funding
    • aligning core funding to be comparable to provincial systems across the country while working towards funding enhancements to better account for remoteness, school size, language and socio-economic conditions
    • providing First Nations schools with $1,500 per student, per year, to support language and culture programs
    • providing support for the expansion to full-day kindergarten in First Nations schools for children aged 4 and 5
    • ensuring special education funding is more predictable, with fewer application-based requirements
  • Supported the development and negotiation of regional education agreements:
    • In July 2018, the federal government, British Columbia, and the First Nations Education Steering Committee renewed the British Columbia Tripartite Education Agreement. The Agreement was signed on January 23, 2019. This Agreement expands federal and provincial funding commitments for First Nations education and solidifies a tripartite governance relationship aimed at addressing the unique needs of First Nations students.
    • In March 2019, the federal government and the Kee Tas Kee Now Tribal Council negotiated an agreement to create the Kee Tas Kee Now Tribal Council Education Authority. This new Education Authority provides aggregated service delivery to 5 communities in Alberta.
  • In September 2018, the federal government, the Assembly of First Nations, Inuit Tapiriit Kanatami and the Métis National Council jointly announced the first Indigenous Early Learning and Child Care (IELCC) Framework, led by Employment and Social Development Canada. In addition to investments under the Multilateral Early Learning and Child Care Framework with provinces and territories, starting in 2018, the IELCC Framework provides additional investments of up to $1.7 billion over 10 years. These investments aim to strengthen and increase access to quality early learning and child care services that reflect the unique cultures, needs and priorities of First Nations, Inuit, and Métis children and families. This is part of supporting and creating more high-quality, affordable child care in Indigenous communities across the country.
  • Continued to provide support to First Nations and Inuit post-secondary students, while conducting a review of federal support for Indigenous post-secondary students. The Métis Nation was also an active partner in the review. In conjunction with this review, the Department also worked with partners to develop distinctions-based post-secondary education strategies that respond to the different priorities of First Nations, Inuit and Métis partners.
  • Worked with Employment and Social Development Canada to bring changes to First Nations post-secondary student support programs that reflect early engagement with the Assembly of First Nations. These changes will improve flexibility for students, such as increasing maximum amounts payable, expanding eligible expenditures and allowing students more time to complete their programs. In addition, students who are registered under the Indian Act but do not have Canadian citizenship (for instance, a First Nations community that spans across the Canada/United States border) now have access to the Canada Student Loan Program, since the start of the 2018–19 school year.
2. Indigenous children and families receive child and family wellness services

Ensuring that children and families stay together continues to be a top priority for the Department as it supports the well-being of Indigenous peoples through the delivery of services. Profound reform of the child welfare system is in progress so that it is truly child-centred, community-directed, and focused on prevention. The goal is to ensure children remain in their communities, are connected to their language and culture, and that Indigenous peoples control and design their child welfare systems. This requires working in full partnership with Indigenous peoples with the active inclusion of provinces and territories. To advance this reform in 2018–19 and to help ensure that Indigenous children and families receive child and family services, the Department:

  • Implemented Canadian Human Rights Tribunal orders (including the February 2018 order). Accordingly, provided funding, retroactive to January 2016, to First Nations Child and Family Services (FNCFS) agencies based on actual needs for maintenance; prevention; intake and investigation; legal fees and building repairs; small agencies; child service purchase amounts (for additional services, e.g. groceries, bills, childcare, cleaning and professional services); and for band representatives in Ontario. The increased funding is meant to provide FNCFS agencies with adequate and predictable resources to develop and deliver culturally-based child welfare standards and services, including prevention services.

Letter of understanding signed between the Cowichan Tribes and the Governments of Canada and British Columbia to support the development of a framework and process for Cowichan Tribes to exercise their jurisdiction over child and family services for their members in January 2019.

  • Implemented a new stream of funding, the Community Well-being and Jurisdiction Initiative, totaling approximately $105  million in 2018–19, which provided First Nations communities with greater access to culturally-appropriate prevention and early intervention services, while promoting the continuity of family, community and cultural connections for First Nations children in care.
  • Co-developed federal legislation with Indigenous partners (First Nations, Inuit and Métis leaders and experts; treaty nations; provinces and territories; and those with lived experience) to affirm Indigenous peoples' jurisdiction over child and family services. To support these efforts, 65 engagement sessions were held across the country, with nearly 2,000 participants. On June 21, 2019, Bill C-92: An Act respecting First Nations, Inuit and Métis children, youth and families, received Royal Assent.
  • Continued work with the Inuit Tapiriit Kanatami, through the Inuit-Crown Partnership Committee, on a work plan to support culturally-appropriate reform of child and family services; and supported priorities of the Métis Permanent Bilateral Mechanism by funding the Métis National Council for engagement on the co-development of federal legislation. A memorandum of understanding (MOU) was signed in December of 2018 (renewed June 2019), which formalizes the negotiation of a 10-year Métis Nation Child and Family Services Accord. Work is underway to establish the working group and begin discussions.
  • Established or continued trilateral tables in most provinces and territories, with the exception of Nunavut, NWT and New Brunswick. The trilateral tables focus on the harmonization of provincial and territorial legislation with federal legislation and support communities to provide needs-based services and programs.
  • Began engaging with Indigenous partners, provinces and territories to co-develop a data and reporting strategy to increase inter-jurisdictional data collection, sharing and reporting to better understand the rates and reasons for apprehension. The Department implemented a new on-line data reporting system for prevention programing, which will support identifying and sharing best practices and results.

The Department provides funding designed to ensure the safety and security of Indigenous women, children and families. This requires working in full partnership with Indigenous peoples, and the active inclusion of provinces and territories. In 2018–19, the Department:

  • Supported First Nations women, children, and families with family violence shelter services through funding a network of shelters on reserve and prevention activities on and off reserve.
    • In collaboration with the Canada Mortgage and Housing Corporation's (CMHC) Shelter Enhancement Program, ISC expanded the current network of 41 on-reserve shelters available throughout Canada with the construction of 5 new shelters in British Columbia, Saskatchewan, Manitoba, Ontario and Quebec to further the reach of prevention-based services and supports. The Manitoba shelter was opened in November 2018. By Fall 2019, it is expected that the remaining 4 new shelters will be fully operational.
    • ISC reimbursed the Governments of Alberta and Yukon for costs to shelter families and children living on reserve fleeing violence.
    • ISC provided financial support to over 300 prevention activities for both on and off reserve Indigenous populations. Prevention projects on reserve are targeted for community needs, and both prevention and shelter activities are tailored to meet cultural needs.
  • Provided annual core funding to the National Aboriginal Circle Against Family Violence to act as a national coordinator by supporting shelters and their staff through training forums, prevention activities, research and collaboration with key partners.
  • Engaged with Indigenous partners, including Indigenous women's organizations, advocates, provinces and territories, and other Government departments on a regular basis, including through bi-weekly discussions with the provinces and territories and weekly interdepartmental meetings, in preparation for the release of the National Inquiry into Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women and Girls. The Final Report was released on June 3, 2019, and a commitment towards developing a National Action Plan has been made to address gender-based violence. The Department will continue to work with our Indigenous partners, including Indigenous women's organizations and LGBTQ and Two-Spirit organizations, to support CIRNAC in the development of an Indigenous-led National Action Plan that is distinction-based and regionally informed.
3. Indigenous peoples receive essential social services

Essential social services help First Nations communities meet basic and special needs; support employability and participation in the workforce; help vulnerable populations maintain their independence in their home communities; and, improve socio-economic outcomes. In 2018–19, in support of this key result, the Department:

  • Launched a First Nations-led engagement process to improve Income Assistance and funded First Nations to deliver case management to individuals to support their transition to employment or education.
  • Provided over $33 million for case management and pre-employment supports to 6,903 Income Assistance clients (18 to 64 years old) in 145 First Nations communities, including 38 additional communities from that of last year.
  • Provided funding to 230 organizations under the Urban Programming for Indigenous peoples, including the Friendship Centre movement, the 5 Métis Nation Governing Members, Inuit organizations, and other urban Indigenous and non-Indigenous organizations (e.g. Niqinik Nuatsivik Nunavut Food Bank). These funds supported delivery of effective, culturally-appropriate programs/services and research projects that aim to provide better understanding of the urban Indigenous reality. The Department also funded 30 coalitions nationally to promote local collaboration, identify needs and develop plans to address community-identified priorities. Examples of projects funded in 2018–19 include:
    • the Aboriginal Mother Centre Society (Vancouver, British Columbia) for programming that provides emphasis on Indigenous health, healing, and awareness
    • the Circle Project Association Inc. (Regina and Saskatoon, Saskatchewan) for core funding to provide employment, on-the-job training, and mentorship for Indigenous peoples with a focus on the development of young Indigenous leaders
    • the Hamilton Executive Directors' Aboriginal Coalition to improve the coordination of services for Indigenous peoples residing in urban areas
    • the Montreal Urban Aboriginal Community Strategy NETWORK for 2 projects, one to document achievements and assess organizational impact, and one to develop a homelessness strategy
  • Visited communities in 3 regions, and attended a conference in a fourth, to listen to the concerns raised by Assisted Living program administrators and to identify opportunities to improve their capacity to deliver services.
Results achieved
Departmental results Performance indicators Target Date to achieve target Actual results
Indigenous students receive an inclusive and quality education % of First Nations on-reserve students who graduate from high school To be determined by March 2021a To be determined 40.5%b
Number of funded First Nations and Inuit students who graduate with a post-secondary degree/diploma/ certificate To be determined by March 2021a To be determined 3,852b
% of First Nations and Inuit population with a post-secondary degree/certificate To be determined by March 2021a To be determined First Nations: 36.4%
Inuit: 28.7%c
% of students attending First Nations-administered schools who are taught at least one subject in a First Nations language To be determined by March 2021a To be determined 88.6%
% of students with special education needs with learning plans in place To be determined by March 2021a To be determined 87.7%b
% of students being educated under First Nations school boards (or other transformative models) To be determined by March 2021a To be determined Available in January 2020
Indigenous children and families receive child and family wellness services % of First Nations children on reserve in care To be determined by March 2021d To be determined 5.6%e
% of children in care who are placed with a family member (kinship care) To be determined by March 2021d To be determined 20.6%e
% of First Nations communities that run their own Family and Community Well-Being programs To be determined by March 2021d To be determined Not availablef
% of requests for overnight residence in shelters by First Nations women on reserve that are met To be determined To be determined Not availableg
% of communities with family violence prevention programming 55% 2020–21 Anticipated to be available in November 2020
% of First Nations communities that run their own Child and Family Services To be determined To be determined Not availableh
Indigenous peoples receive essential social services The Income Assistance dependency rate Decreasing year over year 2017–18 and ongoing 27.7%
% of cases where a resident on reserve was assessed for services from the Assisted Living Program and received those services Greater than 99% Not available 97.37%i
Number of individuals who received services under Urban programming for Indigenous peoples To be determined To be determined Not availablej
a In the meantime, the Department aims to increase results.
b The result is from 2017–18. Due to reporting recipient timelines, 2018–19 data will be available in September 2020.
c The results are from the 2016 Statistics Canada Census of Population.
d To be determined in consultation with stakeholders.
e Based on the current reporting cycle, the most recent finalized data is from 2017–18.
f This is a new indicator. Supporting data will become available in 2020.
g This is a new indicator. The target will be developed once the baseline is established in 2020–21.
h This is a new indicator. The target will be developed once the baseline data is collected in 2019–20. Discussions are underway with communities such as the Cowichan Tribes in British Columbia, with whom ISC signed a letter of understanding in January 2019 to chart a path towards recognizing and implementing jurisdiction over their own child and family services. In 2019–20, progress on these types of agreements is expected to continue.
i This result is preliminary and does not include data from Ontario.
j Further engagement with key stakeholders, such as Friendship Centres, is required to set targets (by December 2019) and report results (by Fall 2020).
Budgetary financial resources (dollars)
2018–19
Main Estimates
2018–19
Planned spending
2018–19
Total authorities available for use
2018–19
Actual spending
(authorities used)
2018–19
Difference
(actual spending minus planned spending)
4,343,203,558 4,343,203,558 4,885,152,188 4,878,181,605 534,978,047

The difference between 2018–19 planned spending and actual spending primarily reflects an incremental of funding provided through Supplementary Estimates, Budget Implementation Vote, and Treasury Board Vote 5 for:

  • the First Nations Child and Family Services Program (+$413.7 million)
  • the transformation of First Nations elementary and secondary education programs (Budget 2016) (+$37.5 million)
  • creating a more responsive income assistance program that addresses the needs of First Nations communities (Budget 2018) (+$43.2 million)

The increase also reflects an internal reallocation of resources from other programs to meet the increased demand for social development programs and services.

Human resources (full-time equivalents)
2018–19
Planned full-time equivalents
2018–19
Actual full-time equivalents
2018–19
Difference
(actual full-time equivalents minus planned full-time equivalents)
496 518 22

The difference between 2018–19 planned FTEs and actual FTEs primarily reflects an incremental of funding provided through Supplementary Estimates, Budget Implementation Vote, and Treasury Board Vote 5 for the First Nations Child and Family Services Program which is being partially offset by employee turnover.

Financial, human resources and performance information for ISC's Program Inventory is available in the GC InfoBase.

Community and Regional Development

Description

Support the efforts of Indigenous and Northern communities in community infrastructure, natural resources and environmental management. This includes: acquisition, construction, operation and maintenance of essential infrastructure assets, and connectivity; land management and resource development; and clean energy development.

Results

To achieve progress in this area, the Department focused on the following 3 Departmental Results.

1. Indigenous peoples have reliable and sustainable infrastructure

Investing in infrastructure is about investing in people and communities. It's about improving the quality of life in First Nations communities by ensuring people have safe housing and drinking water, better schools, and cultural and recreational spaces that bring people together as a community. In 2018–19, ISC continued the important work towards supporting Indigenous peoples with a base of reliable and sustainable infrastructure through the following results:

Long-term drinking water advisories
  • Continued to support First Nations in their efforts to have safe, reliable, and sustainable public water and sanitary wastewater systems in their communities. Since 2016, more than $1.22 billion have been invested to support 561 water and wastewater projects in 582 First Nations communities, serving approximately 458,000 people. As of March 31, 2019, 215 of these projects have been completed, including 107 in 2018–19. There are 346 projects ongoing.
    • Between November 2015 and March 31, 2019, 81 long-term drinking water advisories on public systems on reserve have been lifted, 36 have been added, and 1 was deactivated. 59 long-term drinking water advisories remain in effect as of that date. ISC supported the elimination of 24 long-term drinking water advisories in collaboration with First Nations partners in 2018–19. The Department is on track to support the elimination of all long-term drinking water advisories on reserve by 2021.
  • Provided funding to plan, design, construct, acquire, renovate, repair, replace, and maintain band-operated elementary and secondary education facilities. Between April 1, 2016 and March 31, 2019, 15 new schools have been constructed, and 33 existing schools completed renovations and upgrades. In 2018–19, 4 new schools were completed and 18 existing schools had renovation and upgrades completed with 112 school projects ongoing.
    • Progress has been made towards achieving the target of 70% of school buildings in good or new condition, however, the goal was not met. This was primarily due to delays in major construction projects, caused by dependency on the availability of temporary winter roads to transport construction materials.
    • ISC expanded the Circuit Rider Training Program (CRTP) as a pilot for on-reserve school infrastructure. This pilot was based on the model for water and wastewater systems. The pilot will provide hands-on training to First Nations personnel who maintain on-reserve school infrastructure and was a new initiative for some regions. This will result in extending the lifespan of these important community assets and helps reduce the risk of unsafe or unhealthy environments for children by keeping the buildings in better condition. ISC also developed national guidelines for the pilot CRTP for on-reserve school infrastructure, which will be offered in some First Nations communities in Quebec, Ontario and Alberta, while continuing the existing CRTP for school initiatives in Saskatchewan and Manitoba. The national guidelines were available in April 2019 and 4 working group meetings were held to share best practices amongst regions.
  • Co-developed, with First Nations, a 10-year National First Nations Housing and Related Infrastructure Strategy that was endorsed by Chiefs through a resolution passed at the December 2018 AFN Special Chiefs Assembly.
    • Informed by the First-Nations led engagements towards Housing Reform held throughout 2018–19, ISC, the Canada Mortgage Housing Corporation (CMHC), and Employment and Social Development Canada worked in partnership with First Nations, both nationally and regionally, to identify the best ways to move forward with on-reserve housing
    • In 2018–19, ISC funded 14 First Nations-led engagement sessions. Engagement summaries are available online
  • Supported the construction, renovation or servicing of 16,439 housing units/lots since April 2016.
  • In 2018–19, ISC provided $4.7 million to First Nations organizations to fund national pilot projects in the categories of governance, finance, management, training in construction and repair, and community planning. ISC is already beginning to see promising results from some of the pilots.
    • For example, the Housing Management Professionals initiative, an innovative national pilot co-funded with CMHC, is a new professional First Nations Housing Association. It will include culturally-sensitive professional training for First Nations housing manager graduates, as well as the creation of a national association of designation to increase professional recognition and the creation of a community of practice for housing managers. Going forward, it is expected that this initiative will result in 146 First Nations housing managers scheduled to graduate in 2020.
  • Established a collaborative relationship with the First Nations Housing and Infrastructure Council of British Columbia through a Memorandum of Understanding that committed to the development of a First Nations Housing and Infrastructure Institution for the delivery of housing and infrastructure services to all First Nations in British Columbia. This represents a key step in moving towards the goal of ensuring that services are led by and for Indigenous peoples.
    • In 2018–19, $1.6 million was invested in 6 Indigenous-led projects to explore the development of new models to deliver infrastructure. These projects were in collaboration with First Nations, Inuit and Métis individuals, organizations and communities in support of the eventual goal of ensuring that services for Indigenous communities are delivered by Indigenous communities.
2. Indigenous and northern communities strengthen their capacity to adapt to changing environments

Telegraph Creek, home of the Tahltan Band located in northwestern British Columbia, was heavily impacted by the summer of 2018 wildfires. ISC established an integrated recovery support team, advanced recovery funds, expedited approval processes and provided additional supports under the Building Back Better Strategy Guide such as assistance with social and cultural support and replacing personal belongings.

As a result, the Tahltan Band was able to quickly return their 300 members to permanent or interim housing in their territories – within 103 days. All members are expected to be in permanent housing by 2020–21. This quick turnaround is an example of innovative cooperation between ISC, the First Nations community and Emergency Management British Columbia.

The incidence and risk of natural disasters in Canada, including major floods, forest fires, and tornados, continued to increase in both frequency and intensity in recent years due to climate change. Due to geographic remoteness, lower population densities, and gaps in capacity, Indigenous communities outside of major urban areas are often more vulnerable to the impact of disaster. Emergencies in 2018–19 led to more than 10,000 First Nations residents being displaced. As of February 14, 2019, more than 99% have returned home. Through engagement with Indigenous partners, the Department supports program delivery that emphasizes mitigation and prevention actions to reduce the risk of hazards before a disaster can occur. In 2018–19, ISC:

  • Supported First Nations-led engagement activities for multilateral emergency management service agreements reflecting the Department's shift towards enhanced inclusion and equality of First Nations partners in decision-making and self-determination around emergency management. This shift required the re-opening of existing bilateral service agreements between Canada and the provinces while adjusting the approach in jurisdictions currently without any service agreement in place. Engagement was undertaken with First Nations communities, Tribal Councils, Indigenous Representative Organizations and technical service providers in 5 provinces (British Columbia, Saskatchewan, Manitoba, Ontario, and Prince Edward Island). In April 2019, ISC signed the first ever tri-lateral Memoranda of Understanding with the First Nations Leadership Council and the Province of British Columbia to work together, collaboratively, to enhance emergency management services for First Nations communities in the region.
  • Provided $7.4 million in funding support for wildfire risk reduction projects since 2015–16 in northern Saskatchewan. This has resulted in wild land fire training for 1,654 individuals on reserve. Of these, 665 were employed to conduct forest thinning activities covering 582 hectares including the creation of strategic fuel breaks and the removal of burnable materials around homes in 20 high-risk communities.
  • Invested $39 million in community-led planning pilot projects through innovative 2-year funding agreement, which were signed in 2018–19. The objective of this initiative will demonstrate that community-led planning strengthens governance capacity. Strong governance enables communities to adapt to changing environments through sound planning that identifies risks and change management strategies that are relevant to the unique needs of each community. At the end of 2018–19, there were approximately 140 First Nations and Inuit communities involved in 20 pilots.
3. Land and resources in Indigenous communities and the North are sustainably managed

In March 2018, the federal government announced a $1.6 billion investment in the Wataynikaneyap Power Project to connect 16 remote First Nations to the provincial power grid in northwestern Ontario. Wataynikaneyap Power is a licenced transmission company which is owned by 24 First Nations in partnership with Fortis. The goal is for First Nations to own 100% of the company.

In December 2018, the fly-in community of Pikangikum First Nation was the first community connected to the Ontario power grid, eliminating their dependency on diesel for electricity generation. Work is continuing to connect the 15 other First Nations in Northern Ontario.

Many remote Indigenous communities are not connected to power grids and rely on high-cost diesel-powered electrical generation. This leads to more electrical outages, restrictions on the number of houses and community infrastructure that can be constructed, and diesel supply challenges for communities that rely on winter roads. Investment in alternative energy sources, where possible, can provide reliable, clean energy at a lower cost and reduce the potential for environmental contamination from the storage of fuel on reserve for Indigenous communities.

In 2018–19, to support Indigenous communities, ISC:

  • Coordinated with First Nations, federal departments, and other levels of government, in order to maximize First Nations' access to Pan-Canadian Framework on Clean Growth and Climate Change funding. These funds support greenhouse gas emissions reductions and improved community resilience to climate change.
  • Supported 50 projects that protect First Nations communities from immediate climate-related hazards, such as flooding and shoreline erosion with an investment of $12.95 million through the First Nations Infrastructure Fund and Gas Tax Fund.
  • Supported 19 communities south of 60° (not including British Columbia) and 27 communities in the north, to undertake research and action related to climate change capacity building, traditional food and activities, food security, and mental wellness.

In May 2018, Wuikinuxv First Nation in British Columbia completed the 350 kW Nicknaqueet River Hydropower Project, for which the community received a 2018 Clean Energy BC award. This power facility has replaced over 90% of diesel electricity generation with safe, reliable energy from a local source. ISC invested $12 million to support the design and construction of the facility.

  • Completed 2 projects that significantly reduced dependence on diesel for electricity generation in Pikangikum First Nations, Ontario and Wuikinuxv First Nations, British Columbia in 2018–19. There are also 24 diesel reduction projects ongoing in 24 remote First Nations communities across Canada. Other communities are exploring partnerships with third-party service providers and the Government of Canada to reduce diesel consumption through renewable and/or energy conservation projects. ISC continues to support First Nations-led efforts to establish baseline community diesel consumption and identify and implement renewable electricity options to reduce diesel consumption in remote communities.
Results achieved
Departmental results Performance indicators Target Date to achieve target Actual results
Indigenous peoples have reliable and sustainable infrastructure Number of long-term drinking water advisories affecting First Nations public drinking water systems on reserve 0 March 2021 59
% of First Nations housing that is adequate, as assessed and reported annually by First Nations 75% March 31, 2019 75%a
% of First Nations and Inuit households living in a dwelling that contains more than one person per room (measure of over-crowding) To be determinedb To be determined 5.6% Total Registered Indian households
  • On reserve: 12.7%
  • Off reserve: 2.7%
  • Inuit households: 16%
% of First Nations schools with a condition rating of "good" or "new" 70% March 31, 2019 60%
Indigenous and Northern communities strengthen their capacity to adapt to changing environments % of First Nations covered by emergency management service agreements 60% March 31, 2019 83%
Land and resources in Indigenous communities and the North are sustainably managed % of First Nations, Inuit and northern communities that are dependent on diesel To be determined To be determined 6%
% of First Nations, Inuit and northern communities that are implementing projects that reduce dependency/reliance on diesel To be determined To be determined 60%
a The result is for 2017–18. 2018–19 housing data will be reported by First Nations communities by end of December 2019 through the Community Infrastructure and Housing Annual Report and actual results will be available in winter 2020 in GCInfobase.
b Through a collaborative approach with First Nations partners, ongoing engagements are underway to identify targets and timelines specific to First Nations' priorities and needs.
Budgetary financial resources (dollars)
2018–19
Main Estimates
2018–19
Planned spending
2018–19
Total authorities available for use
2018–19
Actual spending
(authorities used)
2018–19
Difference
(actual spending minus planned spending)
1,824,658,041 1,824,658,041 2,719,510,557 2,682,659,160 858,001,119

The difference between 2018–19 planned spending and actual spending primarily reflects an incremental of funding provided through Supplementary Estimates and Budget Implementation Vote for:

  • the First Nations Water and Wastewater Enhanced Program and to monitor and test on-reserve drinking water (+$499.0 million)
  • infrastructure projects in Indigenous communities (+$266.8 million)
  • the Emergency Management Assistance Program (+$99.8 million)
  • advancing the new fiscal relationship with First Nations (Budget 2018) (+$64.6 million)

This increase is offset by an internal reallocation of resources to other programs to meet other priorities.

Human resources (full-time equivalents)
2018–19
Planned full-time equivalents
2018–19
Actual full-time equivalents
2018–19
Difference
(actual full-time equivalents minus planned full-time equivalents)
611 828 217

The difference between 2018–19 planned FTEs and actual FTEs primarily reflects an incremental of funding provided through Supplementary Estimates for:

  • the First Nations Water and Wastewater Enhanced Program and to monitor and test on-reserve drinking water
  • infrastructure projects in Indigenous communities

Financial, human resources and performance information for ISC's Program Inventory is available in the GC InfoBase.

Internal Services

Description

Internal Services are those groups of related activities and resources that the federal government considers to be services in support of programs and/or required to meet corporate obligations of an organization. Internal Services refers to the activities and resources of the 10 distinct service categories that support Program delivery in the organization, regardless of the Internal Services delivery model in a department. The 10 service categories are: Management and Oversight Services; Communications Services; Legal Services; Human Resources Management Services; Financial Management Services; Information Management Services; Information Technology Services; Real Property Services; Materiel Services; and Acquisition Services.

Results

Management and Oversight Services

To ensure that programs and services delivered by ISC are relevant, efficient and effective, in 2018–19, the Department conducted audits, evaluations, financial investigations and risk assessments. Special attention was given to identifying, assessing, and responding to the risks that existed with the formation of ISC as a new department. For example, risk analysis work revealed that there was a risk that ISC would not be able to effectively design, operationalize and manage through the changes necessary to transform the Department and implement the government's agenda.

To respond to this risk, ISC implemented a number of change management and project management mechanisms to engage staff and ensure changes and expectations were clearly understood during the period of transformation. Increased efforts were also made to strengthen internal communication, co-ordination and collaboration within regions and with headquarters. The Department enhanced its work with committees, other government department working groups, provinces and territories to promote transparency, oversight, and collaborative approaches to consultation, as well as policy, program, and agreement implementation – including the development of clear roles, responsibilities and deliverables.

A new Departmental Results Framework for 2019–20 and beyond was developed to better reflect ISC's mandate and vision as part of a broader reconciliation agenda. The Framework is designed to demonstrate progress on: improved access to quality services for Indigenous peoples; improved quality of life outcomes for Indigenous peoples; and the progressive devolution of services to Indigenous communities. It is expected that the Framework will continue to evolve as co-development efforts progress.

In our commitment to evidence-based policymaking, the Department continued to strengthen its demographic and socio-economic research and analytical capacity. Important investments continue to be made both in the collection and dissemination of Indigenous survey data, including the Aboriginal Peoples Survey and the First Nations Labour and Employment Development Survey. As part of these efforts, the Department also continued to work with partners such as the First Nations Information Governance Center, Statistics Canada, and academia to better understand socio-economic gaps between Indigenous and non-Indigenous peoples.

Communications Services

The Department supported the advancement of a range of government priorities by communicating progress through a variety of communication products such as backgrounders and fact sheets. In 2018–19, ISC led multiple transformation communication initiatives related to the dissolution of Indigenous and Northern Affairs Canada (INAC) and the creation of CIRNAC and ISC. A new ISC website was created for the Department where relevant content was migrated and updated from the former INAC webpage. The Department also led the development of a new ISC corporate look.

Human Resources Management Services

ISC concentrated its efforts to finalize the Department's Workplace Well-being and Mental Health Strategy, which was officially released in February 2019. The Strategy aims to set the path for an organizational wellness journey, and has been developed with the contribution of all areas of the organization. The leading committee, composed of employees from both ISC and CIRNAC, was able to successfully co-develop this strategy despite the dissolution of the former INAC and the ongoing transformation of ISC and CIRNAC. The Government of Canada made a commitment to ensure that the well-being and mental health of all employees is a departmental priority. ISC committed to: responding to the Public Service Employee Survey concerns raised by employees, creating a workplace that is free of harassment, discrimination and incivility, mobilizing employees to take action to make the workplace a better place for all, and engaging them in sharing their ideas and decision-making processes.

With regards to Indigenous recruitment, leadership development, and retention, the Aboriginal Leadership Development Initiative continued to be delivered by CIRNAC under the umbrella of the Deputy Minister's Aboriginal Workforce Initiative II. This initiative succeeded in launching its Cohort 5, with 21 participants from 12 government departments including ISC and CIRNAC. By developing Indigenous leaders, as ISC and CIRNAC are shaped, career opportunities will be enhanced for Indigenous peoples and Indigenous perspectives, practices and contributions will be incorporated into the way the new departments operate.

In collaboration with the Public Service Commission, ISC also developed a Federal Student Work Experience Program initiative aimed at recruiting Indigenous students to specifically work on Treaty Pay. In the summer of 2018, approximately 20 Indigenous students were hired through this targeted initiative.

In July 2018, the Aboriginal Peoples Employment Program (APEP) was transferred from Health Canada as the First Nations and Inuit Health Branch became a part of ISC. The APEP aims to increase the number of Indigenous employees to 30% by August 31, 2020 and also enhance the distribution of Indigenous employees by directorate, region, functional area and classification level.

Source: PeopleSoft Human Resource Management System, as of March 31, 2019. Employment Equity statistics are compiled using the voluntary Employee self-identification form. Employment Equity statistics include employees that are either indeterminate, term (greater than 3 months), or seasonal employees. Employees on leave without pay are not included.
Description of the Map of Indigenous ISC employee representation

The image shows the map of Canada with the % of Indigenous employees at ISC by province or region.

  • Northern Regions: 21.1%
  • British Columbia: 31.1%
  • Alberta: 35.8%
  • Saskatchewan: 38.9%
  • Manitoba: 40.9%
  • Ontario: 38.6%
  • Quebec 14.0%
  • National Capital Region: 16.0%
  • Atlantic Regions: 25.7%

Since implementing a new approach to addressing issues related to the implementation of the Phoenix Pay System and adding resources to the pay function, the Department has demonstrated improvements and was in the top 10 federal departments in terms of reducing their backlog. Through collaborative work with the Pay Centre, there has been a decrease in pay issues. CIRNAC continues to offer support to ISC for pay-related issues and is also working to move towards processing pay through the Pay Pod model, early in 2019–20. This initiative is part of the Government of Canada's commitment to supporting employees and resolving public service pay issues as quickly as possible.

Financial Management Services

In 2018–19, the Department successfully delivered the integrated financial systems for the 2019–20 fiscal year, revised business processes, budget management regimes and reporting processes to enable the transition of people, services, financial information and integrated systems required to ensure payments to Indigenous recipients were processed.

Information Management and Information Technology Services

The Information Management and Information Technology (IM/IT) services supported ISC in planning, designing and implementing IM/IT solutions required to support both departments and implementing Government of Canada IM/IT projects, standards, direction and strategies. At the same time, existing systems were maintained to support business continuity.

Real Property Services, Materiel Services, and Acquisition Services

In 2018–19, the Department continued the implementation of its Real Property Management Action Plan to address urgent health and safety risks identified through various studies and to minimize/manage departmental liability with respect to its off-reserve custodial real property portfolio. Significant progress was made in a number of areas, including demolition projects, asset-specific strategic planning, internal/external stakeholder consultation and divestiture planning. Implementation of recommendation of various studies along with divestiture planning will continue in the coming year in consultation with internal and external stakeholders to address ownership and other sensitive issues. The transfer of health facilities from Health Canada to ISC was completed; asset-specific strategic plans will need to be developed for these assets to ensure conformance with applicable legal and other requirements.

Budgetary financial resources (dollars)
2018–19
Main Estimates
2018–19
Planned spending
2018–19
Total authorities available for use
2018–19
Actual spending
(authorities used)
2018–19
Difference
(actual spending minus planned spending)
64,986,485 64,986,485 182,671,529 146,561,915 81,575,430

The difference between 2018–19 planned spending and actual spending primarily reflects an incremental of funding provided through Supplementary Estimates for internal support services (+$53.7 million); and an internal reallocation of resources from other programs to address funding pressures in: Information Technology; Legal Services (billings from the Department of Justice for work on litigation files of ISC); Management and Oversight; Financial Management; and Material Management. This increase is offset by the deferral of funding for internal services (-$10.8 million) to future years. These funds were not required in 2018–19 and will be re-profiled to future years when it would be available for the intended purpose.

Human resources (full-time equivalents)
2018–19
Planned full-time equivalents
2018–19
Actual full-time equivalents
2018–19
Difference
(actual full-time equivalents minus planned full-time equivalents)
695 653 -42

Financial, human resources and performance information for ISC's Program Inventory is available in the GC InfoBase.

Analysis of trends in spending and human resources

Actual expenditures

Departmental spending trend graph

Note: Due to rounding, figures may not add to totals shown.

Description of Departmental spending trend graph

This stacked bar graph depicts actual spending from 2017 to 2019 and planned spending from 2019 to 2022:

  • In 2017–18, total actual spending was $4,288 million. Of this amount, $4,238 million is voted spending and $49 million is statutory spending.
  • In 2018–19, total actual spending is $11,587 million. Of this amount, $11,506 million is voted spending and $81 million is statutory spending.
  • In 2019–20, total planned spending is $11,578 million. Of this amount, $11,456 million is voted spending and $123 million is statutory spending.
  • In 2020–21, total planned spending is $11,461 million. Of this amount, $11,367 million is voted spending and $94 million is statutory spending.
  • In 2021–22, total planned spending is $10,709 million. Of this amount, $10,618 million is voted spending and $91 million is statutory spending.

The spending trend shown in the table above reflects the partial year of actual expenditures in 2017–18 as ISC was established on November 30, 2017 as per the Orders in Council.

The 2018–19 actual spending is significantly higher than the 2017–18 actual spending as it reflects the full year of actual expenditures in 2018–19 compared to the partial year of actual expenditures in 2017–18.

Spending is expected to decrease by $877.8 million by 2021–22, compared to 2018–19, primarily due to:

  • Net decrease in spending related to various significant infrastructure investments, including water and wastewater, housing, education facilities, health facilities and other infrastructures (-$691.4 million)
  • Decrease due to the sunset of funding for Jordan's Principle (-$392.4 million). This initiative was renewed through Budget 2019
  • Decrease of funding for the Emergency Management Assistance Program (-$99.8 million)
  • Decrease due to the sunset of funding related to health support for survivors of Indian Residential Schools and their families (Budget 2018) (-$76.5 million)
  • Net increase in funding for the Elementary and Secondary as well as Post-Secondary Education Programs (+$388.7 million)
  • Net increase in funding for the non-insured health benefits for First Nations and Inuit (+$144.6 million)

Decisions on the renewal of the sunset initiatives will be taken in future budgets and reflected in future estimates.

Estimates by Vote

For information on ISC's organizational votes and/or statutory expenditures, please see the Public Accounts of Canada 2018 on the Public Services and Procurement Canada website.

Budgetary performance summary for Core Responsibilities and Internal Services (dollars)
Core Responsibilities and Internal Services 2018–19
Main Estimates4
2018–19
Planned spending4
2019–20
Planned spending2
2020–21
Planned spending2
2018–19
Total authorities available for use4
2018–19
Actual spending (authorities used)4
2017–18
Actual spending (authorities used)1
Individuals and Families 4,343,203,558 4,343,203,558 N/A N/A 4,885,152,188 4,878,181,605 N/A
Community and Regional Development 1,824,658,041 1,824,658,041 N/A N/A 2,719,510,557 2,682,659,160 N/A
First Nations and Inuit Health 3,092,364,290 3,092,364,290 N/A N/A 4,091,002,957 3,879,614,779 N/A
Services and Benefits to Individuals N/A N/A 1,963,612,086 1,775,476,820 N/A N/A 648,354,6012
Health and Social Services N/A N/A 4,611,510,367 4,737,111,630 N/A N/A 1,927,149,9932
Governance and Community Development Services N/A N/A 2,542,307,175 2,472,545,992 N/A N/A 1,524,992,9852
Indigenous Self-Determined Services N/A N/A 2,350,269,508 2,369,018,506 N/A N/A 116,729,9332
Amount not allocated to the above core responsibilities N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A 45,141,5003
Subtotal 9,260,225,889 9,260,225,889 11,467,699,136 11,354,152,948 11,695,665,702 11,440,455,544 4,262,369,012
Internal Services 64,986,485 64,986,485 110,917,383 106,499,017 182,671,529 146,561,915 25,429,592
Total 9,325,212,374 9,325,212,374 11,578,616,519 11,460,651,965 11,878,337,231 11,587,017,459 4,287,798,604
1ISC was established on November 30, 2017. Therefore, the 2017–18 actual spending column represents a partial year from November 30, 2017 to March 31, 2018. The 2017–18 actual spending has been restated from the Program Alignment Architecture to reflect the 2019–20 Departmental Results Framework.
2These results are presented under the following Core Responsibilities: Services and Benefits to Individuals, Health and Social Services, Governance and Community Development Services, and Indigenous Self-Determined Services.
3The 2017–18 actual spending is related to actual spending under the "Other Claims Program" that doesn't exist in the ISC Departmental Results Framework.
4These results are presented under the following Core Responsibilities: Individuals and Families, Community Regional Development, and First Nations and Inuit Health.

The $2,553.1 million difference between planned spending ($9,325.2 million) and total authorities available for use ($11,878.3 million) in 2018–19 primarily reflects incremental funding provided through Supplementary Estimates, Budget Implementation Vote and Treasury Board votes for the following items:

  • First Nations Water and Wastewater Enhanced Program and to monitor and test on-reserve drinking water (+$528.9 million)
  • First Nations Child and Family Services program (+$414.5 million)
  • Health, social and education services and support for First Nations children under Jordan's Principle (+$323.3 million)
  • Infrastructure projects in Indigenous communities (+$288.9 million)
  • Non-Insured Health Benefits for First Nations and Inuit (Budget 2018) (+$195.0 million)
  • Emergency Management Assistance Program (+$99.8 million)
  • Clinical and Client Care Program and e-Health Infostructure Program (Budget 2018) (+$91.4 million)
  • Increased health support for survivors of Indian Residential Schools and their families (Budget 2018) (+$77.3 million)
  • Indigenous Early Learning and Child Care Framework (+$70.3 million)
  • Advancing new fiscal relationship with First Nations (Budget 2018) (+$64.9 million)
  • Building healthier First Nations and Inuit communities (+$56.8 million)

The $291.3 million difference between total authorities available for use ($11,878.3 million) and actual spending ($11,587.0 million) in 2018–19 primarily reflects actual expenditures that were lower than expected due to the demand-driven nature of the programs, such as:

  • Non-Insured Health Benefits for First Nations and Inuit (Budget 2018) (-$102.4 million)
  • Health, social and education services and support for First Nations children under Jordan's Principle (-$101.6 million)
2018–19 Budgetary actual gross spending summary (dollars)
Core Responsibilities and Internal Services 2018–19
Actual gross spending
2018–19
Actual gross spending for specified purpose accounts
2018–19
Actual revenues netted against expenditures
2018–19
Actual net spending (authorities used)
First Nations and Inuit Health 3,943,079,400 0 (63,464,621) 3,879,614,779
Individuals and Families 4,878,181,605 0 0 4,878,181,605
Community and Regional Development 2,682,659,160 0 0 2,682,659,160
Subtotal 11,503,920,165 0 (63,464,621) 11,440,455,544
Internal Services 146,561,915 0 0 146,561,915
Total 11,650,482,080 0 (63,464,621) 11,587,017,459

Actual human resources

Human resources summary for Core Responsibilities and Internal Services (full-time equivalents)
Core Responsibilities and Internal Services 2017–18
Actual full-time equivalents*
2018–19
Planned full-time equivalents
2018–19
Actual full-time equivalents
2019–20
Planned full-time equivalents
2020–21
Planned full-time equivalents
First Nations and Inuit Health N/A 1,985 2,211 N/A N/A
Individuals and Families N/A 496 518 N/A N/A
Community and Regional Development N/A 611 828 N/A N/A
Services and Benefits to Individuals 470 N/A N/A 1,165 1,170
Health and Social Services 524 N/A N/A 1,318 1,307
Governance and Community Development Services 339 N/A N/A 1,032 1,032
Indigenous Self-Determined Services N/A N/A N/A 17 N/A
Subtotal 1,333 3,092 3,557 3,532 3,509
Internal Services 119 695 653 736 739
Total 1,452 3,787 4,210 4,268 4,248
* ISC was established on November 30, 2017. Therefore, the 2017–18 actual FTE column represents a partial year from November 30, 2017 to March 31, 2018. The 2017–18 actual FTE has been restated from the Program Alignment Architecture to reflect the 2018–19 Departmental Results Framework.

Expenditures by vote

For information on ISC's organizational voted and statutory expenditures, consult the Public Accounts of Canada 2018-19.

Government of Canada spending and activities

Information on the alignment of ISC's spending with the Government of Canada's spending and activities is available in the GC InfoBase.

Financial statements and financial statements highlights

Financial statements

ISC was created by Orders in Council on November 30, 2017 based on the transfer of the First Nations and Inuit Health Branch from Health Canada and the Regional Operations and Education Social Development Program and Partnership sectors of the former INAC.

ISC's financial statements (unaudited) for the year ended March 31, 2019, are available on the departmental website.

Financial statements highlights

Condensed Statement of Operations (unaudited) for the year ended March 31, 2019 (dollars)
Financial information* 2018–19
Planned results**
2018–19
Actual results
2017–18
Actual results
Difference
(2018–19 Actual results minus 2018–19 Planned results)
Difference
(2018–19 Actual results minus 2017–18 Actual results)
Total expenses 9,537,261,210 11,612,705,231 4,539,282,596 2,075,444,021 7,073,422,635
Total revenues 159,756,878 63,940,639 7,970,310 (95,816,239) 55,970,329
Net cost of operations before government funding and transfers 9,377,504,332 11,548,764,592 4,531,312,286 2,171,260,260 7,017,452,306
*Totals may not match financial statements due to rounding.
**Please refer to the Future-Oriented Statement of Operations on ISC's website.
Expenses by Type

Total expenses were $11,613 million in 2018–19 representing an increase of 154% from the previous year's expense due to a full year of operation in 2018–19. Transfer payments, the majority to First Nations and to provincial and territorial governments and institutions, amounted to $8,868 million (76%) and $772 million (7%) respectively. Other significant operating expenses included utilities, materials and supplies totaling $541 million (5%), professional and special services totaling $490 million (4%), and salaries and employee future benefit totaling $480 million (4%).

Revenues by Type

The Department's total revenues for 2018–19 amounted to $64 million. Respendable revenues from the provision of services of a non-regulatory nature constitute the majority of the department's revenues.

Condensed Statement of Financial Position (unaudited) as of March 31, 2019 (dollars)
Financial Information* 2018–19 2017–18 Difference
(2018–19 minus 2017–18)
Total net liabilities 2,210,451,684 1,897,335,623 313,116,061
Total net financial assets 1,981,074,926 1,611,692,704 369,382,222
Departmental net debt 229,376,758 285,642,919 (56,266,161)
Total non-financial assets 31,473,407 28,071,732 3,401,675
Departmental net financial position (197,903,351) (257,571,187) 59,667,836
*Totals may not match financial statements due to rounding.
Liabilities by Type

Total net liabilities were $2,210 million at the end of 2018–19, representing an increase of 16% over the previous year. This increase is mainly due an increase in PAYE related to transfer payments and in accounts payable recorded at year-end. Accounts payable and accrued liabilities represent the largest portion of total liabilities at $1,256 million (57%). Other significant liabilities include trust accounts of $634 million (29%) and the provision for contingent liabilities of $234 million (11%).

Net Financial Assets by Type

Total net financial assets at the end of 2018–19 were $1,981 million representing an increase of 23% over the previous year. The increase is mainly due to a $368.3 million increase in asset due from the Consolidated Revenue Fund. The net financial assets for 2018–19 are mainly comprised of $1,916 million due from the Consolidated Revenue Fund (97%) and accounts receivable and advances of $116 million (6%). These amounts are offset by the total financial assets held on behalf of Government of $53 million (-3%).

Non-Financial Assets by Type

Non-financial assets are composed of tangible capital assets in the amount of $31 million at the end of 2018–19.

Supplementary information

Corporate information

The information below reflects the organization as of March 31, 2019.

Organizational profile

Appropriate minister: The Honourable Seamus O'Regan

Ministerial portfolio: Department of Indigenous Services Canada

Enabling instrument: Paragraph 3(1)(a) of the Financial Administration Act and P.C. 2017-1464, P.C. 2017-1465, and P.C. 2017-1466.

Date of establishment: November 30, 2017

Other: None

Raison d'être, mandate and role: who we are and what we do

Raison d'être:

ISC works collaboratively with partners to improve quality of life and access to high quality services for Indigenous peoples. Our vision is to support First Nations, Inuit and Métis to design, manage and deliver services to their communities.

Mandate and role:

Mandate and role are available on ISC's website.

Operating context and key risks

Information on operating context and key risks is available on ISC's website.

Reporting framework

The ISC Departmental Results Framework and Program Inventory of record for 2018–19 are shown below.

Core Responsibility: First Nations and Inuit Health
Contributes to improved First Nations and Inuit health by providing or funding health programs and services to First Nations and Inuit communities, and by providing supplementary health benefits to eligible First Nations and Inuit individuals.
Departmental Results Indicators Program inventory
First Nations and Inuit individuals and communities are healthier
  • % of First Nations and Inuit adults who reported being in "excellent" or "very good" health
  • First Nations and Inuit life expectancy at birth
  • % of First Nations and Inuit communities with access to mental wellness team services
  • % of the recommended number of sampling weeks that public water systems in First Nations communities were monitored for bacteria
Healthy Child Development
Mental Wellness
Healthy Living
Communicable Diseases Control and Management
Environmental Public Health
Clinical and Client Care
Home and Community Care
Jordan's Principle
Supplementary Health Benefits
Health Planning, Quality Management and Systems Integration
Health Human Resources
Health Facilities
e-Health Infostructure
British Columbia Tripartite Health Governance
First Nations and Inuit have improved access to supplementary health benefits
  • % of clients who received at least one Non-Insured Health Benefit per year
  • % of clients who received preventive dental services
First Nations and Inuit health is supported by modern infrastructure and Indigenous governance
  • % of nursing stations, health centres and treatment centres with telehealth access
  • Number of clinical telehealth sessions delivered to First Nations clients
  • % of health facilities that have been newly constructed or undergone major renovations in the past 10 years
  • % of First Nations and Inuit communities that control the design, delivery and management of health programs and services
Responsive primary care services are available to First Nations and Inuit
  • Number of approved requests for products and services to support First Nations children under the Jordan's Principle
  • % of communities receiving clinical and client care services in remote and isolated communities with access to nurse practitioner services
  • % of First Nations on reserve who reported needing services at home for a physical or mental condition and were receiving these services
  • % of First Nations adults in communities where clinical and client care services are delivered who rate the quality of health services in their community as either excellent or very good
Core Responsibility: Individuals and Families
Support the well-being of Indigenous children, individuals and families on-reserve and in urban centres through the delivery of services. This includes funding essential to First Nations for: elementary, secondary and post-secondary students; culturally-appropriate services for children in-care, family violence protection and prevention services; support for seniors, adults and children with chronic diseases and disabilities; and income assistance for individuals and families in financial need. Also included are programs and services for Indigenous peoples transitioning to or living in urban centres.
Departmental Results Indicators Program inventory
Indigenous students receive an inclusive and quality education
  • % of First Nations on-reserve students who graduate from high school
  • Number of funded First Nations and Inuit students who graduate with a post-secondary degree/ diploma/ certificate
  • % of First Nations and Inuit population with a post-secondary degree/certificate
  • % of students attending First Nations-administered schools who are taught at least one subject in a First Nations language
  • % of students with special education needs with learning plans in place
  • % of students being educated under First Nations school boards (or other transformative models)
Education
Income Assistance
Assisted Living
First Nations Child and Family Services
Family Violence Prevention
Urban Programming for Indigenous peoples
Indigenous children and families receive child and family wellness services
  • % of First Nations children on reserve in care
  • % of children in care who are placed with a family member (kinship care)
  • % of First Nations communities that run their own Family and Community Well-Being programs
  • % of requests for overnight residence in shelters by First Nations women on reserve that are met
  • % of communities with family violence prevention programming
  • % of First Nations communities that run their own Child and Family Services
Indigenous peoples receive essential social services
  • The Income Assistance dependency rate
  • % of cases where a resident on reserve was assessed for services from the Assisted Living Program and received those services
  • Number of individuals who received services under Urban programming for Indigenous peoples
Core Responsibility: Community and Regional Development
Support the efforts of Indigenous and Northern communities in community infrastructure, natural resources and environmental management. This includes: acquisition, construction, operation and maintenance of essential infrastructure assets and connectivity; land management and resource development and clean energy development.
Departmental Results Indicators Program inventory
Indigenous peoples have reliable and sustainable infrastructure
  • Number of long-term drinking water advisories affecting First Nations public drinking water systems on reserve
  • % of First Nations housing that is adequate, as assessed and reported annually by First Nations
  • % of First Nations and Inuit households living in a dwelling that contains more than one person per room (measure of over-crowding)
  • % of First Nations schools with a condition rating of "good" or "new"
Indigenous Governance and Capacity
Water and Wastewater
Education Facilities
Housing
Other Community Infrastructure and Activities
Emergency Management Assistance
Indigenous and Northern communities strengthen their capacity to adapt to changing environments
  • % of First Nations covered by emergency management service agreements
Land and resources in Indigenous communities and the North are sustainably managed
  • % of First Nations, Inuit and Northern Communities that are dependent on diesel
  • % of First Nations, Inuit and Northern Communities that are implementing projects that reduce dependency/reliance on diesel

Supporting information on the Program Inventory

Financial, human resources and performance information for ISC's Program Inventory is available in the GC InfoBase.

Supplementary information tables

The following supplementary information tables are available on the ISC website.

Federal tax expenditures

The tax system can be used to achieve public policy objectives through the application of special measures such as low tax rates, exemptions, deductions, deferrals and credits. The Department of Finance Canada publishes cost estimates and projections for these measures each year in the Report on Federal Tax Expenditures. This report also provides detailed background information on tax expenditures, including descriptions, objectives, historical information and references to related federal spending programs. The tax measures presented in this report are the responsibility of the Minister of Finance.

Organizational contact information

Indigenous Services Canada
Les Terrasses de la Chaudière
10 Wellington Street, North Tower
Gatineau, Quebec
Mailing Address: Ottawa, Ontario K1A 0H4
Internet: https://www.canada.ca/en/indigenous-services-canada.html
Email: aadnc.webmestre-webmaster.aandc@canada.ca

General and statistical inquiries and publication distribution
Telephone (toll-free): 1-800-567-9604
TTY (toll-free): 1-866-553-0554
Email: aadnc.infopubs.aandc@canada.ca

Departmental library
Telephone: 819-997-0811
Email: aadnc.reference.aandc@canada.ca

Media inquiries – Communications
Telephone: 819-953-1160
Email: SAC.media.ISC@canada.ca

Appendix: definitions

appropriation (crédit)

Any authority of Parliament to pay money out of the Consolidated Revenue Fund.

budgetary expenditures (dépenses budgétaires)

Operating and capital expenditures; transfer payments to other levels of government, organizations or individuals; and payments to Crown corporations.

Core Responsibility (responsabilité essentielle)

An enduring function or role performed by a department. The intentions of the department with respect to a Core Responsibility are reflected in one or more related Departmental Results that the department seeks to contribute to or influence.

Departmental Plan (plan ministériel)

A report on the plans and expected performance of an appropriated department over a 3-year period. Departmental Plans are tabled in Parliament each spring.

Departmental Result (résultat ministériel)

A Departmental Result represents the change or changes that the department seeks to influence. A Departmental Result is often outside departments' immediate control, but it should be influenced by program-level outcomes.

Departmental Result Indicator (indicateur de résultat ministériel)

A factor or variable that provides a valid and reliable means to measure or describe progress on a Departmental Result.

Departmental Results Framework (cadre ministériel des résultats)

Consists of the department's Core Responsibilities, Departmental Results and Departmental Result Indicators.

Departmental Results Report (rapport sur les résultats ministériels)

A report on an appropriated department's actual accomplishments against the plans, priorities and expected results set out in the corresponding Departmental Plan.

experimentation (expérimentation)

Activities that seek to explore, test and compare the effects and impacts of policies, interventions and approaches, to inform evidence-based decision-making, by learning what works and what does not.

full-time equivalent (équivalent temps plein)

A measure of the extent to which an employee represents a full person-year charge against a departmental budget. Full-time equivalents are calculated as a ratio of assigned hours of work to scheduled hours of work. Scheduled hours of work are set out in collective agreements.

gender-based analysis plus (GBA+) (analyse comparative entre les sexes plus [ACS+])

An analytical process used to help identify the potential impacts of policies, programs and services on diverse groups of women, men and gender differences. We all have multiple identity factors that intersect to make us who we are; GBA+ considers many other identity factors, such as race, ethnicity, religion, age, and mental or physical disability.

government-wide priorities (priorités pangouvernementales)

For the purpose of the 2018–19 Departmental Results Report, those high-level themes outlining the government's agenda in the 2015 Speech from the Throne, namely: Growth for the Middle Class; Open and Transparent Government; A Clean Environment and a Strong Economy; Diversity is Canada's Strength; and Security and Opportunity.

horizontal initiative (initiative horizontale)

An initiative where 2 or more departments are given funding to pursue a shared outcome, often linked to a government priority.

non-budgetary expenditures (dépenses non budgétaires)

Net outlays and receipts related to loans, investments and advances, which change the composition of the financial assets of the Government of Canada.

performance (rendement)

What an organization did with its resources to achieve its results, how well those results compare to what the organization intended to achieve, and how well lessons learned have been identified.

performance indicator (indicateur de rendement)

A qualitative or quantitative means of measuring an output or outcome, with the intention of gauging the performance of an organization, program, policy or initiative respecting expected results.

performance reporting (production de rapports sur le rendement)

The process of communicating evidence-based performance information. Performance reporting supports decision making, accountability and transparency.

plan (plan)

The articulation of strategic choices, which provides information on how an organization intends to achieve its priorities and associated results. Generally a plan will explain the logic behind the strategies chosen and tend to focus on actions that lead up to the expected result.

planned spending (dépenses prévues)

For Departmental Plans and Departmental Results Reports, planned spending refers to those amounts presented in Main Estimates.

A department is expected to be aware of the authorities that it has sought and received. The determination of planned spending is a departmental responsibility, and departments must be able to defend the expenditure and accrual numbers presented in their Departmental Plans and Departmental Results Reports.

priority (priorité)

A plan or project that an organization has chosen to focus and report on during the planning period. Priorities represent the things that are most important or what must be done first to support the achievement of the desired Strategic Outcome(s) or Departmental Results.

program (programme)

Individual or groups of services, activities or combinations thereof that are managed together within the department and focus on a specific set of outputs, outcomes or service levels.

result (résultat)

An external consequence attributed, in part, to an organization, policy, program or initiative. Results are not within the control of a single organization, policy, program or initiative; instead they are within the area of the organization's influence.

statutory expenditures (dépenses législatives)

Expenditures that Parliament has approved through legislation other than appropriation acts. The legislation sets out the purpose of the expenditures and the terms and conditions under which they may be made.

Strategic Outcome (résultat stratégique)

A long-term and enduring benefit to Canadians that is linked to the organization's mandate, vision and core functions.

target (cible)

A measurable performance or success level that an organization, program or initiative plans to achieve within a specified time period. Targets can be either quantitative or qualitative.

voted expenditures (dépenses votées)

Expenditures that Parliament approves annually through an Appropriation Act. The Vote wording becomes the governing conditions under which these expenditures may be made.

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