Departmental Plan 2020–2021

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From the Minister

As Minister of Indigenous Services, I am pleased to present the 2020–21 Departmental Plan for Indigenous Services Canada (ISC).

ISC has a mandate to support Indigenous communities to deliver services and programs, and address the unacceptable socio-economic conditions that persist today. To support this mandate, we will continue to focus on 5 key priority areas: keeping children and families together, supporting quality education, improving health outcomes, building reliable infrastructure, and enabling economic prosperity. We have set an ambitious agenda in partnership with Indigenous peoples.

The Act respecting First Nations, Inuit and Métis children, youth and families came into force on January 1st, 2020, and recognizes and affirms the inherent right of self-government through jurisdiction of Indigenous peoples over child and family services. Much like its co-development, it will be implemented in partnership as well. We will continue to make the investments that increase efforts to address the root causes of child apprehension and keep Indigenous children connected to their families, communities and culture.

We will continue the important work of transforming First Nations on-reserve elementary and secondary school education. The co-development of new policy and funding approaches for kindergarten to grade 12 education on reserve advances First Nations control of First Nations education and brings funding to comparable levels to provincial schools. This includes dedicated funding for language and culture, as well as full-day kindergarten. We will advance work with Indigenous partners towards closing the education attainment gap, including greater support for access to, and success in, post-secondary education.

Over the coming years, ISC will move forward with co-development of distinctions-based health legislation that will help to deliver high quality health care for Indigenous peoples, when and where they need it. We will continue to support the National Inuit Suicide Prevention Strategy through $50 million in Budget 2019. We are committed to the full implementation of Jordan's Principle, which helps all First Nations children access the products, services and supports they need, when they need them, work that was recently supported by an investment of $1.2 billion over 3 years. We will continue to work towards engaging with First Nations and Inuit on the development of a holistic First Nations and Inuit long-term care strategy through funding in Budget 2019. We continue working with Inuit partners on eliminating tuberculosis across Inuit Nunangat.

Healthier and stronger communities cannot thrive without appropriate infrastructure, including reliable drinking water and wastewater systems. We are on track to eliminate all long-term drinking water advisories affecting public water systems on reserve by March 2021, supported by a new investment of $739 million. We will work with First Nations on a long-term water and wastewater strategy to ensure sustainability of these systems on reserve. We will continue to address inadequate and overcrowded housing on reserve through investments, policy co-development, innovative pilot projects and initiatives that facilitate access to financing and expand housing options.

Lastly, ISC will continue to promote the economic well-being of Indigenous communities across Canada. We will support capacity-building initiatives on reserve and private sector involvement in projects that lead to higher community revenues and employment. This is why we invested $129 million in Indigenous business development, including in the start-up and expansion of Métis small and medium-sized enterprises. At the recommendation of First Nations, we will continue to sign and build on new 10-year grants, which provide more funding flexibility and predictability for First Nations, and support effective and independent long-term planning. We will continue to invest in communities that want to play a larger role in Canada's economy.

In closing, I am honoured to work with Indigenous partners to ensure Indigenous peoples fully benefit in and participate in Canadian prosperity. It is my hope that ISC will eventually cease to exist as Indigenous communities gradually take over the services and programs they rightly should control. Change will take time, and we must continue to work with Indigenous partners to support and empower communities. The work we do together is critical towards achieving reconciliation, and an improved quality of life for Indigenous peoples is key to a better Canada for all.

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The Honourable Marc Miller, P.C., M.P.
Minister of Indigenous Services Canada

Plans at a glance

Indigenous Services Canada (ISC) was created on November 30th 2017, bringing First Nations and Inuit health services (formerly with Health Canada) together with education, essential social services, child and family services programs, economic development, housing and infrastructure programs from the former Indigenous and Northern Affairs Canada (INAC). The Department received legal status on July 15, 2019, following the coming into effect of The Department of Indigenous Services Act. The Act is clear on the Minister's roles and responsibilities, and the Department's mandate to ensure services are provided to Indigenous peoples with control of services being transferred to Indigenous peoples wherever possible. By continually increasing the services transferred to Indigenous-led institutions and organizations, the Department will achieve its own obsolescence over time. In order to achieve this important goal, the Government is taking a distinctions-based approach in the delivery of services and developing partnership models that improve accountability to Indigenous peoples.

The Act also emphasizes that closing socio-economic and service gaps is an important part of reconciliation. The Department's mandate frames Canada's commitment to support outcomes that acknowledge and address the past, close socio-economic and service gaps, and create the conditions for self-determination through renewed relationships based on equal partnership with Indigenous peoples. To advance reconciliation we need to listen and learn from First Nations, Inuit and Métis on how programs and services should be delivered and how best to transfer the delivery of services.

The principle of substantive equality guides our work at ISC and is critical to ensuring the delivery of high-quality, robust services. Substantive equality is a legal principle referring to the achievement of true equality in outcomes through equal access, equal opportunity, and above all, the provision of services and benefits in a manner that meets unique needs and circumstances, such as cultural, social, economic and historical disadvantage. It has been well-established that Indigenous peoples in Canada have suffered as a result of systemic racism – as evidenced by, for example, the implementation of the residential school system and the child welfare programs/policies, such as the 60's scoop. To achieve substantive equality, efforts are required on two parallel tracks: closing socio-economic gaps and transferring the delivery of services to Indigenous control. These elements do not operate in isolation, nor is one required in advance of the other in order to achieve better outcomes for Indigenous peoples.

ISC has 5 interconnected priority areas to continue to focus on in 2020–21. In delivering on these 5 key priorities, with full partnership with Indigenous communities, ISC's ultimate goal is ensuring that the design, delivery and control of services are led by Indigenous peoples for Indigenous peoples.

Keeping Children and Families Together

The over-representation of First Nations, Inuit and Métis children in the child and family services system has been described as a humanitarian crisis. According to Census 2016, Indigenous children aged 0 to 14 make up 7.7% of all Canadian children, yet represent 52.2% of children in foster care. Ensuring that children and families stay together is a top priority for the Government of Canada.

The Government of Canada is working in close collaboration with Indigenous partners, provinces, and territories to address the over-representation of Indigenous children and youth in care in Canada. This includes ongoing work to fully implement the orders of the Canadian Human Rights Tribunal and to pursue measures to reform child and family services so that Indigenous peoples are able to design and control the delivery of culturally-appropriate child and family services in their communities.

To that end, in January 2020, An Act respecting First Nations, Inuit and Métis children, youth and families came into force. The Act seeks to advance Canada's commitment to reconciliation with First Nations, Inuit and Métis through renewed nation-to-nation, Inuit-Crown and government-to-government relationships by:

  • Recognizing and affirming the inherent right to exercise jurisdiction of First Nations, Inuit and Métis over child and family services.
  • Establishing national principles such as best interests of the child, cultural continuity and substantive equality to help guide the provision of child and family services in relation to Indigenous children.
  • Contributing to the implementation of the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples (UNDRIP) based on the recognition of rights, respect, co-operation and partnership.

ISC is building upon its engagements with First Nations, Inuit, and Métis Nation communities and organizations to support the reform of Indigenous child and family services and is focused on successfully implementing this legislation which includes allocating long-term, predictable and sustainable funding to support child and family services.

Successful long-term reform requires action across all aspects of the 6 point plan from the Emergency Meeting on Indigenous Child and Family Services in January 2018, namely:

  • Continuing the work to fully implement the orders of the Canadian Human Rights Tribunal, and reforming child and family services including moving to a flexible funding model.
  • Shifting the programming focus to prevention and early intervention.
  • Supporting communities to exercise jurisdiction over child and family services through the implementation of the Act respecting First Nations, Inuit and Métis children, youth and families.
  • Accelerating the work of trilateral and technical tables across the country.
  • Supporting Inuit and Métis Nation leadership to advance culturally appropriate reform.
  • Developing a data and reporting strategy with provinces, territories and Indigenous partners.

In addition, ISC will collaborate with First Nations to validate what was heard during the recent First Nations-led engagement process on the Income Assistance Program. The objective is to inform future program changes to better meet the needs of individuals and families living on reserve that will ultimately lead to greater self-sufficiency through the transition to employment and education opportunities.

Supporting Quality Education

Education is crucial to closing the socio-economic gap between Indigenous peoples and non-Indigenous peoples. The gap in educational attainment and access to culturally-relevant social support makes it difficult for Indigenous peoples to fully contribute to, and fully benefit from participation in Canada's economy and society, and perpetuates socio-economic inequities between Indigenous peoples and other Canadians. ISC is working with Indigenous partners to ensure that Indigenous students have access to a high-quality education that will improve student outcomes, such as graduation rates. In order to further advance access to quality education, ISC will be:

  • Continuing to implement a jointly-developed policy framework for elementary and secondary First Nations on reserve education on reserve and establish regionally-driven approaches that strengthen First Nations education. The framework improves the way ISC funds First Nations elementary and secondary education by funding First Nation schools comparable to provincial schools and supporting expanded language and cultural programming and full-day kindergarten. Through this approach, regional funding has seen increases of up to 39%.
  • Implementing new jointly-developed distinctions-based post-secondary education strategies to support increased access and enable greater success in post-secondary education for First Nations, Inuit and Métis Nation students. This includes expanding financial assistance for First Nations students and supporting First Nations in the development of regional post-secondary education models. ISC will also support new Inuit and Métis Nation-led strategies by providing funding for students as well as complementary programs and services to strengthen governance capacity.
    • In addition, by improving access to post-secondary education, Indigenous organizations and communities will have the flexibility to make funding decisions to enable Indigenous community members, including women, girls, and gender-diverse individuals, to benefit from ISC's educational initiatives.
  • Developing and implementing regional education agreements and other First Nations-led education models that respond to the education goals and priorities set by First Nations and respect the principle of First Nations control of First Nations education. This will include continued investments in institutional capacity building, research, and innovation as well as strengthened partnerships between First Nations and provincial and territorial education systems.
  • Continuing participating in the process of modernizing the First Nations and Inuit Youth Employment Strategy under the broader Youth Employment and Skills Strategy to better promote access to skills and work experience for Indigenous youth. This will be informed by the results of the Employment and Social Development Canada-led engagement process with Indigenous partners.

Improving Health Outcomes

Significant gaps persist in the overall health status of Indigenous peoples compared to non-Indigenous peoples. Ensuring access to responsive health services, an interdisciplinary healthcare work force, and safe and modern health infrastructure are fundamental to sustainable and effective health systems. Increased ownership, control and management of health services are the foundation for closing gaps in health outcomes.

ISC works with First Nations and Inuit partners to address health inequities by increasing access to quality health services, by responding to the social determinants of health and by enhancing mental wellness services, including addictions treatment and prevention services. We will continue to work in partnership with Indigenous communities to improve health outcomes by:

  • Initiating the co-development of distinctions-based Indigenous health legislation with Indigenous partners.
  • Continuing to invest in the delivery of high-quality health care for all Indigenous peoples.
  • Fully implementing Jordan's Principle to ensure that First Nations children have access to the health, social, and educational supports and services that they need, when and where they need them, while co-developing a longer term approach with First Nations.
  • Advancing a long-term care continuum with First Nations meant to maximize the linkages between community, provincial or territorial services, including the needs of individuals who age out of Jordan's Principle, a similar consideration for Inuit under the Inuit Child First Initiative.
  • Continuing to develop strategies to improve retention and recruitment of nurses working on reserve through focused efforts at enhancing clinical and infrastructure support.
  • Continuing to support Inuit Tapiriit Kanatami (ITK), the national representative body for Inuit, and regional Inuit land claims organizations, including the Nunavik Regional Board of Health and Social Services in lieu of the Makivik Corporation in Nunavik, to:
    • lead on the elimination of tuberculosis in Inuit Nunangat by 2030;
    • fully implementing the National Inuit Suicide Prevention Strategy and Inuit Child First Initiative;
    • addressing food security.
  • Completing the joint review of the Medical Transportation benefit under the Non-Insured Health Benefits Program to achieve significant increases in access for First Nations and Inuit.
  • Investing in the mental wellness continuum to support strengths-based programming.
  • Improving the accessibility of services for remote communities by working towards developing evidence-informed standards for some remote/isolated communities, as well as developing a 5 to 10-year plan for accessing pharmacy services and medication management in remote and isolated First Nations communities.

Together with Indigenous partners, ISC will also continue to advance health transformation initiatives that pursue healthcare delivery that is designed and delivered by and for Indigenous communities. For example, there are two new health transformation opportunities emerging in Nova Scotia and Manitoba. In Nova Scotia, the Mi'kmaw are in the process of designing a Mi'kmaw Health Wellness Authority that would assume greater control over health programs and services in the Province and work more closely with the provincial health system. In Manitoba, ISC is also involved in discussions with the Southern Chiefs of Manitoba to pursue similar opportunities for transformation.

Building Reliable Infrastructure

Reliable infrastructure is a foundation for improving quality of life and socio-economic outcomes in other key priority areas for every community. The Government of Canada is working with First Nations, Inuit and Métis Nation partners to co-develop distinct infrastructure strategies that will support their vision of self-determination and lead to better social and economic outcomes for their communities. The Government of Canada is supporting community-led planning and providing core funding to assist with the costs of First Nations governance in order to support First Nations in moving towards self-determination. Despite recent historical investments in Indigenous infrastructure, there is still much to be done. ISC will continue to invest in building reliable infrastructure on reserve and meeting critical needs by:

  • Eliminating all long-term drinking water advisories affecting public water systems on reserve by March 2021; this requires close collaboration with First Nations partners to identify public water and wastewater system needs, develop infrastructure capital plans and design and implement management plans for the operation and maintenance of water and wastewater systems.
  • Working with the Assembly of First Nations (AFN) on First Nations-led engagement to advance options on safe drinking water legislation and to inform the co-development of a long-term water and wastewater strategy for First Nations.
  • Co-developing and investing in distinctions-based community infrastructure plans, and addressing critical needs in First Nations, Inuit, and Métis communities by 2030, including health facilities such as new treatment centres, roads, schools, health facilities, and high-speed internet. These 10-year plans will also include new investments to support the operation and maintenance of this infrastructure and will be supported by the Minister of Infrastructure and Communities; supporting the continued development and implementation of distinctions-based housing strategies.
    • The First Nations Housing and Related Infrastructure Strategy and Implementation Plan is a good example of a co-developed, distinctions-based strategy. ISC is providing funding to address the inadequacy of housing and prevalence of overcrowding for priority health and safety housing projects.
  • Pursuing innovative approaches to service delivery, such as multi-year agreements with service providers or partnerships along the lines of the agreement negotiated with FireSmart Canada, a project that reduces the risk of wildfires through fire prevention and fuel hazard reduction projects in several First Nations communities, in order to enhance First Nations capacity in emergency management, ultimately increasing their resiliency.
  • Continuing to support First Nations to mobilize and increase capacity to deliver housing programs and services on reserve and supporting innovation through investments, policy co-development, innovative pilot projects and initiatives that facilitate access to financing and expand housing options.
  • Facilitating First Nations engagement of emergency management services across Canada's regions, led by regional Indigenous representative organizations, in order to better understand First Nations' emergency management needs, and perspectives on service delivery within each region, while also incorporating Indigenous knowledge. The results of these engagement sessions will support the negotiations of multilateral emergency management service agreements that will see the integration of First Nations as full and equal partners, like the one signed in British Columbia in April 2019.

Enabling Economic Prosperity

As a result of a long history of colonialism, neglect and failed paternalistic policies, many First Nations, Inuit and Métis do not enjoy the same quality of life as other Canadians. The Department is committed to working in partnership to change this reality for Indigenous peoples by supporting an enabling environment to achieve prosperity. In order to advance economic prosperity, ISC is:

  • Supporting capacity-building efforts in communities to improve the delivery of economic development services and build on successful investments by supporting projects that leverage private sector investment and lead to higher community revenues and employment. These efforts are critical to support First Nations and Inuit communities' economic development, from projects such as feasibility studies to large-scale commercial infrastructure.
  • Working closely with Innovation, Science and Economic Development Canada and the Business Development Bank of Canada to leverage greater access to capital to support the growing network of Aboriginal Financial Institutions and Indigenous entrepreneurs. ISC is also working to increase the number of viable businesses in Canada owned and controlled by Indigenous people, to provide a supportive business environment for Indigenous peoples and to advocate for, and inform employers about the hiring of Indigenous peoples.
  • Continuing to work with the Métis Capital Corporations to support Métis entrepreneurs in the establishment and expansion of businesses. As well, ISC will continue to coordinate with relevant government departments to advance other economic development priorities as put forward by the Métis National Council through the Permanent Bilateral Mechanism process.
  • Working in collaboration with other federal governments departments to grow Indigenous participation in procurement across the federal government, and to help reach the 5% Indigenous procurement target. ISC is working to enhance the creation, growth, and long-term viability of Indigenous businesses by expanding opportunities to compete for and win federal procurement opportunities through the Procurement Strategy for Aboriginal Businesses. The Strategy will be leveraged to create partnerships with other federal departments, provincial governments, Indigenous partners and industry.

Finally, the Government of Canada remains committed to building a new fiscal relationship with First Nations that results in sufficient, predictable and sustained funding. ISC is implementing the 10-year grant, extensively co-developed with First Nations partners, which enhances self-determination by providing greater predictability and flexibility of funding allowing them to focus on delivering high-quality services to their citizens. The grant also significantly reduces the reporting burden on First Nations communities.

For more information on ISC's plans, priorities and planned results, see the "Core responsibilities: planned results and resources, and key risks" section of this report.

Core responsibilities: planned results and resources, and key risks

This section contains detailed information on ISC's planned results and resources for each of its core responsibilities. It also contains information on key risks related to achieving those results.

Services and Benefits to Individuals

Description

These services and benefits are mainly delivered directly to Indigenous people by the Department. They include, among other services and benefits, individual First Nations and Inuit clinical care and health-related benefits such as pharmacy, dental and vision care. The Department is also responsible for determining individuals' entitlement to Indian registration and for the issuance of various proofs of registration, including the Secure Certificate of Indian Status (SCIS), which can be used to access various programs and services.

Planning highlights

To achieve progress in this area, ISC will focus on 2 departmental results.

1. Quality and timely services are delivered directly to Indigenous people
1.1 Health Services

Direct delivery of health services and benefits to Indigenous people takes place in a complex environment with unique challenges and opportunities. Challenges can relate to the remoteness of service locations, attracting and retaining healthcare professionals, and providing services in a way that is culturally relevant and capable of improving outcomes. In 2020–21, ISC will continue efforts to stabilize access to quality services by addressing human resources challenges pertaining to health services delivery, working with partners to improve the quality of services, and ensuring services are sustainable and culturally relevant.

ISC is implementing the Nursing Recruitment and Retention Strategy and the Nursing Services Response Centre to support nurses working in communities. We will work with partners to compile a comprehensive inventory of information on cultural humility and safety in support of the Nursing Now Canada campaign. This 3-year campaign runs in collaboration with international partners and aims to improve health and health care by raising the status and profile of nursing. The inventory will be shared with schools of nursing across the country with an aim of improving cultural awareness and sensitivity within the nursing field.

ISC will support the expansion of the Children's Oral Health Initiative to First Nations and Inuit communities.

ISC will improve client access to the Supplementary Health Benefits Program (Non-Insured Health Benefits [NIHB]) in collaboration with First Nations and Inuit partners by:

  • Continuing engagement with the AFN on a multi-year joint review of the program to identify and implement actions that enhance client access to benefits. In 2020–21, joint reviews of the medical supply and equipment benefit and the medical transportation benefit are expected to be completed.
  • Continuing engagement with ITK and the National Inuit Committee on Health to find ways of improving the delivery of NIHB to Inuit clients.
  • Continuing to advance project implementation of the new Health Information Claims Processing Services solution and services contract, which is anticipated to launch in the Spring of 2020.
1.2 Individual Affairs

ISC will continue to provide direct client service in Headquarters and all regional offices to determine eligibility for registration under the Indian Act. ISC issues proof of registration documents, including the Secure Certificate of Indian Status, which identify individuals who are eligible to receive various programs and services.

On August 15, 2019, the last legislative amendments of Bill S-3 came into force to address sex-based inequities in registration under the Indian Act. In keeping with the commitment to reconciliation and a renewed nation-to-nation relationship, S-3 requires that ISC provide a report to Parliament on the provisions enacted by S-3 by December 12, 2020.

ISC is improving and modernizing in-person services offered by regional offices to individuals wishing to apply for Indian Status. Following the removal of the 1951 cut-off through Bill S-3, application processes and documentation requirements are being assessed and streamlined. A new version of the Secure Certificate of Indian Status mobile PhotoApp will be issued to facilitate more timely service in processing photos from applicants and increase the quality of the photos submitted. ISC will also continue implementation of a partnership agreement with Correctional Service Canada and other institutions where registered First Nations offenders are being offered a Secure Certificate of Indian Status before they are released.

Additionally, ISC will continue to:

  • Support and empower First Nations in the administration of estates of deceased, minors or dependent adults.
  • Support and facilitate First Nations access and management of their trust moneys.
  • Support the delivery of treaty annuity payments.

These priorities will be addressed by providing advisory services to First Nations and First Nations organizations, other government departments, and ISC's sectors and regions regarding these programs, and through the updating of legislative accountabilities and policies for these programs.

2. Health services delivered to Indigenous people contribute to improved health outcomes

Access to quality, timely, stable and culturally relevant health services is fundamental to individual, family and community well-being. In 2020–21, ISC will continue its efforts to adopt a patient-centered approach to health service delivery and focus, in particular, on closing the gap in access to quality healthcare between Indigenous and non-Indigenous peoples in Canada. Furthermore, ISC will work to ensure that Indigenous peoples are in control when it comes to designing and delivering their healthcare programs and services in order to further improve health outcomes.

ISC will work in partnership with First Nations to strengthen public health capacity among First Nations communities, including by identifying gaps in vaccine coverage provided by provinces for First Nations, and to work towards resolving identified gaps.

In order to enhance preparedness and response efforts related to natural disasters and public health emergencies and outbreaks such as the novel Coronavirus, the Department will also establish a holistic emergency management framework within ISC, to support integrated and responsive services for First Nations communities while preparing, mitigating and responding to natural disasters and health emergencies.

ISC will partner with the Canadian Indigenous Nurses Association, the AFN and the First Nations Health Authority in British Columbia to facilitate an understanding of issues unique to the Indigenous and non-Indigenous nursing workforce that impact retention and recruitment, and to determine progress towards a representative workforce.

ISC will support Phase 2 of the nursing workforce survey by surveying First Nations employed nurses working in First Nations communities. The survey will inform the process of devolution of healthcare services in First Nations communities as nurses make up the majority of healthcare staff working in First Nations communities.

Gender-Based Analysis Plus (GBA+)

ISC is in the early stages of a collaborative process with federal and Indigenous partners, including Indigenous women's organizations, to co-develop distinctions-based, Indigenous-first GBA+ approaches and tools. This work is intended to promote more responsive, culturally-competent policies and services that meet the unique needs of First Nations, Inuit and Métis women, men, and gender-diverse people.

To advance these efforts, in 2020–21, ISC will work closely with the Advisory Committee on Indigenous Women's Well-Being as well as other partners to facilitate the development of new GBA+ approaches designed and guided by Indigenous peoples and perspectives.

In addition, applications for registration and Secure Certificate of Indian Status will provide applicants the opportunity to select a third, non-binary gender identifier. Individuals who are already registered will have the option to amend their information. This change will support inclusion of transgender and non-binary people and protect their personal safety.

Finally, in 2020–21, ISC's health and wellness services aims to incorporate GBA+ into 50% of its planned activities; an increase from 32% in 2019–20. This initiative will ensure that departmental planning processes integrate GBA+, and that program and service development and design are informed by gender and diversity considerations.

Results-based innovationFootnote 1

For this core responsibility, in 2020–21, ISC will:

  • Support the implementation of the Oral Health Practitioner project by collaborating with professional associations and academic institutions in developing feasibility studies for the program.
  • Explore and test options for providing access to First Nations, through a portal, to system-generated reports and statements regarding funds held in trust with ISC, as well as to additional information.
  • Measure progress and document necessary steps to successfully implement midwifery in communities as this work will be critical for informing the development of current projects and for guiding implementation of midwifery on a larger scale.

Risk

The Department's mandate is complex and requires alignment with various partners. The complexity of the strategic landscape, the diversity of perspectives of partners and the extent of operational and cultural changes exposes the Department to some important risks related to policy implementation, internal services capacity and the management of human and financial resources. To implement the Government of Canada's directions and to help manage these risks, the Department is pursuing important internal changes, including different ways of doing business in terms of its culture, processes and services.

The services that must be delivered successfully to Indigenous peoples are diverse and complex. Change and adaptation is needed if they are to be delivered in a new, collaborative, and innovative fashion. It is important to ensure that these changes will not affect the delivery of quality and timely services to communities and individuals. ISC is working with partners to identify opportunities for improving the effectiveness, efficiency and sustainability of services, prioritizing planning based on mutually-agreed upon objectives, facilitating ongoing consultations with recipients to ensure services are meeting critical needs as well as conforming with established human resources and budget management frameworks and controls.

Planned results for Services and Benefits to Individuals

Departmental result: Quality and timely services are delivered directly to Indigenous people
Departmental result indicators Target Date to achieve target
Percentage of First Nations adults who rate the quality of health care services delivered in their community as good or excellent 57% March 31, 2023
Percentage of prior approval requests for medication coverage completed within 24 hours 100% March 31, 2021
Percentage of eligible First Nations and Inuit who received at least one non-insured health benefit in a year 74% March 31, 2022
Percentage of eligible applicants issued a Secure Certificate of Indian Status within 16 weeks from the application date 90% March 31, 2021
Departmental result: Health services delivered to Indigenous people contribute to improved health outcomes
Departmental result indicators Target Date to achieve target
Percentage of First Nations and Inuit adults who reported being in very good or excellent health First Nations: 44%
Inuit: 44%
March 31, 2028

Planned budgetary financial resources for Services and Benefits to Individuals

2020–21 budgetary spending (as indicated in Main Estimates) 2020–21
planned spending
2021–22
planned spending
2022–23
planned spending
1,835,650,316 1,835,650,316 1,896,999,215 1,982,532,986
The year-over-year differences primarily reflect changes in the approved funding profile for the non-insured health benefits for First Nations and Inuit.

Planned human resources for Services and Benefits to Individuals

2020–21
planned full-time equivalents
2021–22
planned full-time equivalents
2022–23
planned full-time equivalents
1,509 1,509 1,509

Financial, human resources and performance information for the ISC program inventory are available in the GC InfoBase.

Health and Social Services

Description

These services are primarily delivered in partnership with Indigenous communities and organizations, provinces/territories and agencies. Together, they focus on the health and well-being of Indigenous people. They include health services to strengthen Indigenous communities in areas such as healthy living, communicable disease control, healthy child development, and community care. They also include social services with an emphasis on children and families, as well as education services from kindergarten to post-secondary.

Planning highlights

To achieve progress in this area, ISC will focus on 3 departmental results.

1. Indigenous people and communities are healthier

ISC is promoting health and well-being of Indigenous people and communities through strength-based approaches to services that focus on the health priorities of partners. Specifically in 2020–21, ISC will focus its work in the following areas:

ISC is supporting the Inuit-specific tuberculosis (TB) elimination strategy through engagement with ITK and collaborating with First Nations partners in the development of a TB reduction action plan for First Nations. ISC will also continue to fund ITK to implement their National Inuit Suicide Prevention Strategy.

ISC is supporting community-led and distinctions-based approaches to address sexually transmitted blood borne infections, including support for the Inuit Sexual Health Network and the implementation of Tavva: National Inuit Sexual Health Strategy, and Ikajurniq: An Inuit Cascade of Care Framework for sexually transmitted & blood borne infections.

In addition, ISC will continue funding members of the Advisory Committee on Indigenous Women's Well Being to advance their Action Plan, including follow-up to the January 2020 Culturally Informed Choice and Consent in Indigenous Women's Health Services, tackling the important issues of forced and coerced sterilization and reproductive health rights.

ISC will also assess service vulnerabilities to climate change and help First Nations to build capacity under the Climate Change and Health Adaptation Program.

Finally, ISC will continue working with federal and Indigenous partners on an approach for addressing food insecurity in Indigenous communities and will also support the implementation of a longitudinal study of First Nations Children and Youth on food, nutrition, and the environment. This work will be led by the University of Ottawa in collaboration with the AFN, University of Montreal, Laval University, and McGill University to help guide future policy decisions.

2. Indigenous people receive social services that respond to community needs

Responding to the needs of First Nations communities on reserve requires a holistic approach to the delivery of social services. These include such services as: family wellness and togetherness services, mental wellness supports, and supports for employability and participation in the workforce. For First Nations living off reserve, Inuit, and Métis, ISC provides support services in urban centres. In 2020–21, ISC will focus on the following elements related to social services.

On January 1, 2020, An Act respecting First Nations, Inuit and Métis children, youth and families came into force, advancing community-directed proposals focused on prevention, and resolving outstanding issues before the Canadian Human Rights Tribunal. Continued investments have helped to ensure that First Nations children remain in their communities, connected to their language and culture, and that Indigenous peoples control and design their child and family services.

The new legislation:

  • recognizes and affirms the inherent right to exercise jurisdiction of First Nations, Inuit and Métis over child and family services;
  • establishes national principles such as best interests of the child, cultural continuity and substantive equality to help guide the provision of child and family services in relation to Indigenous children;
  • contributes to the implementation of the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples (UNDRIP).

We will work in partnership with Indigenous communities to implement this legislation and support them in utilizing this new legislation at a pace that works for them. This will necessitate a distinctions-based approach that is responsive to the unique challenges facing Indigenous communities who would like to enhance their control over child and family services. This will include a discussion and path forward towards sustainable, predictable long-term funding.

ISC will organize an engagement process to co-develop options for a continuum of long-term care services in First Nations and Inuit communities. These efforts will advance long-term care services and services for persons with disabilities in First Nations and Inuit communities.

ISC will collaborate with First Nations to validate what was heard during the recent First Nations-led engagement process on the Income Assistance Program. The objective is to inform future program changes to better meet the needs of individuals and families living on reserve that will ultimately lead to greater self-sufficiency through the transition to employment and education opportunities.

In order to further support investment in minor and major infrastructure projects in Friendship Centres and other service provider facilities for Urban Programming for Indigenous Peoples (UPIP), ISC will launch calls for proposals for the new infrastructure funding stream for UPIP. This will help ensure that urban Indigenous people have safe and accessible facilities in which high quality, culturally-relevant services are provided.

In collaboration with the National Aboriginal Circle Against Family Violence, ISC will undertake an analysis on funded shelters and services to support program and policy review and improvement.

In implementing its full commitment to address the orders of the Canadian Human Rights Tribunal, ISC is working to implement measures to prevent and address discriminatory practices related to child and family services and Jordan's Principle, such as increasing prevention resources for agencies and communities so that First Nations children are safe and families can stay together. ISC will also work on the long-term approach to Jordan's Principle in collaboration with its partners, provinces and territories, to examine and identify gaps in existing programs and increase First Nations governance and control over implementation at the community and regional levels.

3. Indigenous students receive an inclusive and quality education

Education is crucial to closing the socio-economic gap between Indigenous peoples and non-Indigenous peoples. It lays the foundation that supports Indigenous peoples and communities to contribute to and fully benefit from the Canadian economy by accelerating socio-economic growth and reducing barriers to employment. ISC is working with Indigenous partners to ensure that Indigenous students have access to a high-quality education that will improve student outcomes, such as graduation rates. In 2020–21, ISC will work with Indigenous partners in the following areas:

ISC will continue implementing the co-developed policy framework for elementary and secondary First Nations on reserve education. The framework improves the way ISC funds First Nations elementary and secondary education by bringing funding in line with provincial schools and dedicating funding to language and cultural programming and full-day kindergarten.

ISC is developing and implementing regional education agreements and other First Nations-led education models that respond to the education goals and priorities set by First Nations and respect the principle of First Nations control of education. This will include continued investments in institutional capacity building, research, and innovation as well as strengthened partnerships between First Nations and provincial and territorial education systems.

Building on a Ministerial commitment, ISC will implement the new co-developed distinctions-based post-secondary education strategies for First Nations, Inuit and Métis Nation students. These strategies will support increased access and enable greater success in post-secondary education for Indigenous students. It will expand financial assistance for First Nations students and support First Nations in the development of regional post-secondary education models. Further, it supports new Inuit and Métis Nation-led strategies by providing funding for students as well as complementary programs and services to strengthen governance capacity.

ISC is also delivering programs as part of the Youth Employment and Skills Strategy. ISC will continue participating in the process of modernizing the program to better promote access to skills and work experience for Indigenous youth, which will be informed by the results of the Employment and Social Development Canada-led engagement process with Indigenous partners.

Gender-Based Analysis Plus (GBA+)

In 2020–21, ISC will continue to support Indigenous educational achievement, including addressing the impacts of early parenthood. According to 2006 and 2012 Census data, First Nations women experience higher rates of teenage parenthood than non-First Nations women. As a result of these familial responsibilities, teenage and young adult First Nations mothers may not have the time or financial capacity to attend school by themselves or access a child daycare until their child is old enough to access child care through elementary school. ISC will continue to support full-day kindergarten programs for children aged 4 and 5 in order to reduce the cost barrier for caregivers and to provide more opportunities for young parents, who are often young mothers, to attend secondary school or find employment during the years they are eligible for secondary school.

In addition, ISC will improve access to post-secondary education and will provide flexibility to Indigenous organizations and communities to make funding decisions that achieve gender equity. Therefore, Indigenous community members, including women, girls, and gender-diverse individuals, will benefit from ISC's educational initiatives.

Finally, while the number of girls and boys in care is approximately equal, the gender-related experiences of their caregivers can be a significant factor contributing to the relatively high number of First Nations children in care. Indigenous women are at a far higher risk of gendered violence than non-Indigenous women (the General Social Survey 2014 data reflects roughly 3 times higher rates of violent victimization). The First Nations Component of the Canadian Incidence Study of Reported Child Abuse and Neglect 2008 (FNCIS-2008) found that women's experiences of domestic violence and abuse significantly increase the risk of their children being removed from the home. Census 2016 data reflects the relatively high proportion of Indigenous children living with single mothers, with 84.4% of Indigenous children aged 0 to 4 living with a female lone parent. The FNCIS-2008 showed that Indigenous mothers are investigated more often for alleged neglect and maltreatment of their children, and these claims are more likely to be substantiated if parenting alone. ISC has taken important steps to ensure that First Nations are empowered to design and control their programming for families and children so that gender-related factors such as these are addressed in ways that fit the needs of their own communities.

Results-based innovation

ISC will undertake a scan of First Nations housing and related health/social outcomes so as to develop suite of metrics that help measure progress on addressing First Nations housing and inform the development of collective targets.

The National Network of Coalitions and ISC are co-developing a research and innovation agenda. This agenda will assist ISC in targeting research and innovation calls for proposals that encourage a focus on: strategic priorities; identification of inter-related and/or inter-dependent issues; exploring opportunities for greater collaboration; and, adaptations of successful initiatives for implementation throughout the country.

ISC has created two programs specifically focused on funding research and innovation projects in the First Nations education domain. The Innovation program provides funding to First Nations organizations to try new approaches and strategies related to education, including language and culture. The Research program is intended to fund projects to review, assess and promote best practices in First Nations education.

ISC is also working with Indigenous partners to co-develop improvements to education programs and to identify new service delivery strategies including the negotiation of regional education agreements that respect the principle of Indigenous control of Indigenous education.

The Data Management System, an online reporting platform, has been available to First Nations Child and Family Services recipients since April 1, 2019, and enables improved and streamlined data collections through an online platform where agencies can access and assume ownership of their information.

Risk

The diversity and complexity of services delivered, along with resourcing considerations and the objective for ISC to deliver services in a modern and collaborative manner, provide a risk to ISC's capability to adjust to evolving needs and expectations of Indigenous peoples. This risk is managed through change initiatives relating to service modernization and management practices, along with a focus on community and capacity development in programming and relationships, including partnerships with Indigenous professional organizations.

Planned results for Health and Social Services

Departmental result: Indigenous people and communities are healthier
Departmental result indicators Target Date to achieve target
Active tuberculosis incidence rate among Inuit living in Inuit Nunangat Three-year average of 0 cases per 100,000 population March 31, 2030
Active tuberculosis incidence rate among First Nations on reserve Three-year average of 22 cases per 100,000 population March 31, 2028
Rate of newly reported cases of HIV among First Nations Three-year average of 19 cases per 100,000 population March 31, 2028
Percentage of First Nations adults with diabetes accessing newer, novel medications and not on insulin 20% March 31, 2021
Departmental result: Indigenous people receive social services that respond to community needs
Departmental result indicators Target Date to achieve target
Percentage of First Nations and Inuit communities with access to mental wellness team servicesa 34% March 31, 2021
Percentage of First Nations communities offering family support services aimed at keeping families together To be established with partners by March 2021b To be established with partners by March 2021
Percentage of First Nations children on reserve in care To be established with partners by March 2021c To be established with partners by March 2021
Percentage of residents living on reserve who are supported through Income Assistance To be established with partners by March 2023d To be established with partners by March 2023
Number of individuals who received services under Urban Programming for Indigenous peoples To be established with partners by March 2020 To be established with partners by March 2020

a This indicator is a measure of a mental wellness initiative that was completed in 2018–19 ($69M for interim mental wellness measures announced in 2016). The result for this indicator is not expected to change in future unless funding for a separate initiative is available.

b Target and date to achieve target to be determined in consultation with partners after a baseline is established.

c Target to be determined in consultation with partners as part of program renewal. In the meantime, ISC aims to decrease the percentage of children in care.

d A national engagement process and joint technical working group with the AFN is underway to co-develop indicators and targets. In the meantime, ISC will aim to decrease the percentage.

Departmental result: Indigenous students receive an inclusive and quality education
Departmental result indicators Target Date to achieve target
Number of First Nations students who are provided full-day kindergarten services in First Nations administered schools To be established by March 2020a March 2022
Percentage of students attending First Nations administered schools who are taught at least one subject in a First Nations language 89–93% March 2022
Percentage of First Nations on reserve students who graduate from secondary school To be established by March 2021a To be established by March 2021
Number of funded First Nations, Inuit and Métis students who graduate with a post-secondary degree/diploma/certificate

Number of First Nations students: 4,110 – 4,494

Number of Inuit Students: 50

Number of Métis Nation students: Target to be developed with Métis partners by March 2021

March 2025
a In the meantime, ISC aims to increase results.

Planned budgetary financial resources for Health and Social Services

2020–21 budgetary spending (as indicated in Main Estimates) 2020–21
planned spending
2021–22
planned spending
2022–23
planned spending
5,426,092,193 5,426,092,193 5,480,367,554 5,246,073,757
The year-over-year differences primarily reflect:
  • decrease in funding for the continued implementation of Jordan's Principle and supporting Inuit children through the Inuit Child First Initiative
  • sunset (in 2021–22) of funding for increased heath support for survivors of Indian Residential Schools and their families (Budget 2018)
  • net increase in funding for the elementary and secondary as well as post-secondary education programs
  • net increase in funding for income assistance activities

Planned human resources for Health and Social Services

2020–21
planned full-time equivalents
2021–22
planned full-time equivalents
2022–23
planned full-time equivalents
1,490 1,391 1,238

Financial, human resources and performance information for the ISC Program Inventory are available in the GC InfoBase.

Governance and Community Development Services

Description

These services are commonly delivered in partnership with Indigenous communities and institutions and are focused on strong community governance and physical foundations. They include supports for governance capacity in areas such as community planning and financial management. They also include support for investments in community infrastructure, land and resource management, and economic development.

Planning highlights

To achieve progress in this area, ISC will focus on 4 departmental results.

1. Indigenous communities advance their governance capacity

Effective governance is key to the socio-economic progress and the overall well-being of every community, and supports the devolution of services to communities. ISC supports First Nations communities in implementing and developing strong, effective, sustainable governments in support of Canada's constitutional and statutory obligations. At the same time, ISC recognizes the need to break away from colonial approaches and do things in a new way: where First Nations communities lead the way and Indigenous-led institutions facilitate the capacity development of First Nations governments, institutions, and leadership. In 2020–21, ISC will focus its efforts in the following areas.

ISC is supporting community-led planning in First Nations and Inuit communities. As of Fall 2019, 161 First Nations communities have completed community-led plans. 204, including 1 Inuit community, are currently in the process of creating a plan or updating their existing plan. Planning, supported by quality data, is an important tool in strengthening governance capacity and moving towards self-determination. Through the community-led planning process, each community is enabled to adapt plans to their culture and traditions. In addition, ISC will continue to provide core funding through the governance programs to First Nations governments and tribal councils to support ongoing costs of First Nations governance, while also providing tools and support to help them build on their capacity to govern.

ISC is collaborating with First Nations partners to build community capacity to plan and self-administer health programs and services, work with the AFN to advance Health Emergency Management within First Nations communities, and promote trilateral engagement and collaboration in support of strengthened governance over health programs and services.

2. Indigenous peoples have reliable and sustainable infrastructure

The basic, reliable, sustainable infrastructure that exists in most Canadian communities is either missing or in poor condition in many Indigenous communities. For example, clean drinking water, sustainable housing, durable health facilities, and reliable, sustainable, non-diesel energy is not in place in many Indigenous communities. The absence or poor state of infrastructure may result in public health or safety concerns and may also prevent communities from keeping pace with population growth or supporting economic development. By investing in infrastructure and capacity building, ISC is supporting Indigenous communities to have more reliable and sustainable infrastructure that will support economic growth and community well-being. Furthermore, ISC's ability to ensure continuous delivery of health services in First Nations communities depends on maintaining good health facilities. In 2020–21, ISC will continue its work in the following areas.

Text alternative for the graph Long-term drinking water advisories

This line graph depicts the number of long-term drinking water advisories in effect between November 2015 and February 15, 2020, and projected numbers of long-term drinking water advisories expected to be in effect by the end of June and December of each calendar year from 2018 through 2021. It also depicts the projected number of houses and community buildings affected by long-term advisories.

  • In November 2015, there were 105 long-term drinking water advisories on public systems.
  • As of February 15, 2020, 61 long-term drinking water advisories on public systems on reserve were in effect.
  • By end of June 2020, it is projected there will be 40 long-term drinking water advisories on public systems on reserve. Approximately 2,306 homes and 140 community buildings served by a public water system will be under advisory.
  • By end of December 2020, it is projected there will be 11 long-term drinking water advisories on public systems on reserve. Approximately 979 homes and 53 community buildings served by a public water system will be under advisory.
  • In March 2021 it is projected there will be 0 long-term drinking water advisories on public systems financially supported by ISC. Approximately 0 homes and community buildings served by a public water system will be under advisory.

ISC is collaborating with and supporting First Nations in their efforts to ensure access to safe, clean drinking water and treated wastewater in their communities at a standard equivalent to comparable non-Indigenous communities. The Government of Canada is committed to eliminating all long-term drinking water advisories affecting public water systems on reserve by March 2021. As of February 2020, 88 long-term drinking water advisories have been lifted on public systems on reserve. The remaining 61 long-term drinking water advisories will be addressed by March 2021. ISC will continue working with First Nations partners to identify public water and wastewater system needs, develop infrastructure capital plans, and design and implement management plans for the operation and maintenance of water and wastewater systems. In collaboration with First Nations partners, ISC is also taking steps to prevent short-term drinking water advisories from becoming long term, with 151 prevented to date. ISC is also working with First Nations to co-develop implementation plans for the Long-Term Strategy for Water and Wastewater based on unique regional and local needs, including supporting First Nations organizations as they progress toward taking control of water and wastewater services. ISC also works with the AFN on a First Nations-led engagement to advance options on safe drinking water legislation. A Joint Working Group on Safe Drinking Water for First Nations, comprised of the AFN and federal representatives, will co-develop a proposal for a new legislative framework based on the results of both the First Nations-led national and federal-led engagements.

ISC is providing ongoing funding to support the construction of housing units, renovations, additions and lot servicing. ISC will continue to partner with First Nations to co-develop regional housing strategies and First Nations governance models that enable First Nations control over housing in their communities. ISC will also advance the First Nations housing program reform with First Nations partners through pilot, innovation, and capacity projects.

ISC is investing in the construction, renovation, repair and maintenance of First Nations schools to create quality learning environments that are safe and healthy, promoting better education outcomes for First Nations students living on reserve.

ISC is supporting Indigenous communities in their transition to clean and reliable energy. Many remote Indigenous communities currently rely on diesel fuel for electricity and heat, which poses challenges to sustainable development. Reducing reliance on diesel helps to address public health and safety concerns, alleviates environmental impacts such as contaminated sites, and reduces greenhouse gas emissions, as well as energy system blackouts and energy load restrictions that impact critical community infrastructure. ISC is actively working with First Nations, provinces, other government departments and other partners to develop renewable energy and energy efficiency projects.

ISC is enhancing the community infrastructure program on reserve by reviewing and updating program policies in partnership with First Nations. The goal of the policy update is to modernize infrastructure policies to better reflect the changing operational needs of the program and to better support First Nations' self-determination.

ISC is working with provinces, territories, First Nations communities and third party organizations to establish multilateral agreements or emergency management Memoranda of Understanding. Last year, ISC signed the first ever tri-lateral Memoranda of Understanding with the First Nations Leadership Council and the Province of British Columbia to work together, collaboratively, to enhance emergency management services for First Nations communities in the region. A working group consisting of First Nations representatives has been established to work collectively to advance meaningful recognition and enhanced capacity of First Nations within all four pillars of emergency management (preparedness, mitigation, response and recovery). For 2020–21, ISC is continuing work with all jurisdictions and is aiming to sign a Tripartite Memorandum of Understanding on Emergency Management Services with Mi'kmaq Confederacy of Prince Edward Island and the Province.

First Nations communities are often more remote and isolated, and are more likely to be impacted by emergencies such as wildland fires and floods. ISC will continue to support the return of evacuees to safer, more sustainable and resilient communities through the Building back better policy. They also face challenges such as obtaining services comparable to neighboring non-Indigenous communities or access to all-weather roads. ISC is working in partnership with First Nations, provinces and territories, and third-party service providers to increase community-based preparedness, mitigation and resilience to emergency events. ISC is also ensuring support is available during response and recovery phases to better support holistic and timely recovery.

ISC will also continue to support multi-year capital projects and high priority repairs for health facilities as well as addictions treatment and prevention centres in First Nations communities. This includes the continued implementation of the projects funded through Budget 2016 with 47 projects to be completed by March 2021.

3. Land and resources in Indigenous communities are sustainably managed

Land use planning, capacity building and training enable First Nations communities to effectively manage lands, natural resources and solid waste and environmental activities that will leverage community and economic development opportunities. In 2020–21, ISC will focus its efforts in the following areas.

ISC will support the development of First Nations' land-use planning from Budget 2018 investments, including the development of over 20 land use plans in 2020–21. ISC will also build capacity within Indigenous partner organizations to effectively support the devolution of services to First Nations.

ISC will support the development of strategic joint economic development plans between municipalities and neighboring First Nations communities through the second phase of the successful Community Economic Development Initiative with the Federation of Canadian Municipalities and the Council for the Advancement of Native Development Officers. Between now and 2021, as many as 30 municipalities and new communities will create joint economic development and land management partnerships. Currently, 15 partnerships, involving 25 First Nations communities and 23 municipalities, have been created.

ISC will update the Lands Management Manual in consultation with First Nations and Indigenous organizations. Specific attention will be paid to enhancing policies and procedures in respect of designations, leases, permits and individual interests, and further updating guidelines to support the management of natural resources on reserve.

ISC is exploring innovative ways to improve the Reserve Land and Environment Management Program, such as providing funding to train additional land managers to build capacity in the area of land management to support future devolution of service delivery. ISC will also continue to encourage the implementation and expansion of regional hubs to support the capacity-building efforts of Indigenous regional lands associations.

ISC is collaborating with Indigenous partners to support the Indigenous Centre of Expertise for Cumulative Effects Assessment and Management. The Centre helps to build and enhance the capacity of Indigenous communities for cumulative effects assessment, monitoring and management, based on the values of First Nations, Inuit and Métis communities. In February 2020, ISC supported the Centre in hosting the inaugural Forum for Indigenous Cumulative Effects in Calgary. In 2020–21, based on the feedback from the Forum about the Centre's development, ISC will work with the Interim Board to support a fully autonomous Centre through the recruitment of a Board of Directors with regional and First Nations, Inuit and Métis representation, as well as an Executive Director, and continued community outreach to help shape the Centre's development and early investments in the development of tools, including those required to establish an online presence.

ISC will improve solid waste management services in First Nations communities by investing $101 million in 2020–21 to ensure comparability to services available off reserve. This will reduce potential risks to health, safety and the environment, while supporting sustainable economic development.

ISC will continue to support the Contaminated Sites on Reserve Program by investing $47 million in 2020–21 to help assess and remediate contaminated sites on First Nations lands. This will reduce potential risks to health, safety and the environment, as well as reduce federal environmental liabilities. The program is also looking to develop prevention methods to help reduce the prevalence of contaminated sites on reserve lands. ISC will continue to work with First Nations partners to develop and implement a modernized regulatory regime that supports oil and gas development on reserve lands, while discussing and exploring options that would allow First Nations to increase their jurisdiction in this area.

4. Indigenous communities build economic prosperity

ISC supports Indigenous and northern communities in promoting economic development and creating jobs for Indigenous people, and enhancing Indigenous participation in the public and private sector. In 2020–21, ISC will focus its efforts in the following areas.

The Department will support capacity-building efforts in communities to improve the delivery of economic development services and build on successful investments by supporting projects that leverage private sector investment and lead to higher community revenues and employment. These efforts are critical to support First Nations and Inuit communities' economic development, from projects such as feasibility studies to large-scale commercial infrastructure.

ISC will support efforts to increase the number of Indigenous-owned and controlled businesses in Canada. The Department will also provide a supportive business environment for Indigenous peoples and advocate and inform employers about the hiring of Indigenous peoples.

In cooperation with Innovation, Science and Economic Development Canada and the Business Development Bank of Canada, ISC will continue to leverage greater access to capital to support the network of Aboriginal Financial Institutions and Indigenous entrepreneurs, which enables an increase in the number of businesses created by Indigenous entrepreneurs.

To support Métis entrepreneurs in the establishment and expansion of businesses, ISC will continue to work with the Métis Capital Corporations. As well, the Department will continue to coordinate with relevant government departments to advance other economic development priorities as put forward by the Métis National Council through the Permanent Bilateral Mechanism process.

ISC will continue to enhance the creation, growth, and long-term viability of Indigenous businesses by assisting them in competing for and winning federal procurement opportunities through the Procurement Strategy for Aboriginal Businesses (PSAB). The PSAB works to create strengthened strategic partnerships between Indigenous business owners, industry sectors and the Government of Canada. This benefits economic development in Canada while investing in the capacity of Indigenous businesses.

The Department will support, at a minimum, 10 new First Nations signatories to the Framework Agreement on First Nation Land Management, and will continue to support capacity development programming administered by Indigenous organizational partners, such as the First Nations Land Management Resource Centre, to ensure successful transitions from the Indian Act. ISC will also continue to support First Nations law-making and training with respect to matrimonial real property, by providing assistance to the Centre of Excellence on Matrimonial Real Property and the First Nations Chiefs of Police Association for ongoing awareness activities, especially in the areas of enforcement and legal services.

ISC will continue to tailor investments based on data, risk and opportunity analysis and according to local needs (understanding that community requirements vary greatly) and to chart a path for the overall transfer of programs to Indigenous institutions.

Gender-Based Analysis Plus (GBA+)

There are gaps in the collection of gender and social data for First Nations On-Reserve Housing, among other programs, though First Nations may collect this data as part of their own assessments and planning. The Department respects and adheres to the principle of Indigenous ownership of data. In 2020–21, ISC will work with Indigenous partners to co-develop a housing strategy that includes women, and other underrepresented groups in data capture, comprehensive community planning, decision-making and implementation.

ISC and its federal partners are supporting and engaging Indigenous organizations to collect data on vulnerable sub-populations to understand the barriers they face, identify program and service gaps, and co-develop solutions to address them. In 2020–21, a report will be completed and presented on best practices to be applied across the country in support of housing needs for people living with a disability, Indigenous women and families, youth, and LGBTQ2+ persons.

GBA+ is particularly relevant to First Nations education infrastructure. Gender neutral washrooms, ramps and larger washroom stalls for wheelchair accessibility, additional space for high-cost special needs students, and the provision of shared accommodation for teaching staff who do not feel safe living alone are all elements which can be integrated into future schools or housing for teachers. Modern, accessible facilities are a key deliverable for ISC in designing gender-sensitive, intersectional programs and services.

While gender-specific data is not collected as part of governance programs, communities consciously create space in the community planning process for all voices to be heard during the development of plans, including women, men, elders, youth, LGBTQ2 persons, and members of the community who live on and off reserve. Creating a vision for the future of a community, by the community is meant to be an inclusive process.

Gender impacts emergency management programs through differing experiences for men and women. Emergencies and evacuations disproportionately impact vulnerable groups, including women, children, the elderly, the ill, and persons with disabilities. Emergencies expose individuals to varying levels of risk depending on their gender, including socio-economic and health impacts.

Dedicated efforts are underway to apply a gender-lens to the Emergency Management Assistance Program's policy, programming and service delivery, in order to accommodate gender-specific needs during the response and recovery phases of emergencies. In 2020–21, ISC will ensure gender equality in leadership roles and at all levels of decision-making. Women's contributions and participation in formal and informal decision-making around emergency management will be recognized and supported. ISC will also strive to eliminate gender-based violence and harassment, and will promote security and access to justice by reducing physical, sexual or psychological violence through the provision of gender-specific services during emergencies and evacuations.

Finally, ISC is committed to incorporating GBA+ sensitive language in all communications materials during emergencies to ensure that all GBA+ groups feel equally valued, considered and safe.

Results-based innovation

ISC is undertaking innovative, results-based approaches to enhance the operations and maintenance of water and wastewater facilities, such as working with Tribal Councils to pilot the development and operation of hubs to help First Nations communities support the effective operation of their water systems. ISC is supporting 8 Tribal Councils in Ontario ($7.6 million over 2 years) to deliver water and wastewater technical support to 52 First Nations. ISC is supporting the Atlantic Policy Congress (more than $6 million provided to date) to develop a regional water authority for Atlantic First Nations communities.

Risk

As ISC evolves its processes and cultural, organizational and governance frameworks in support of reconciliation and devolution, there is a risk that the priorities and directions of ISC and those of its partners will not be adequately aligned. This risk is being managed by a range of practices including communication and coordination practices aimed at establishing and sustaining strong relationships and partnerships, as well as direction-setting practices aimed at charting a new course in the spirit of co-development. Monitoring mechanisms exist to ensure that misalignment and other concerns are detected in support of early and constructive management of common priorities.

Planned results for Governance and Community Development Services

Departmental result: Indigenous communities advance their governance capacity
Departmental result indicators Target Date to achieve target
Percentage of First Nations with a completed community-led plan 35% March 31, 2022
Departmental result: Indigenous peoples have reliable and sustainable infrastructure
Departmental result indicators Target Date to achieve target
Number of long-term drinking water advisories affecting public water systems on reserve 0 March 31, 2021
Percentage of First Nations housing that is adequate as assessed and reported by First Nations 75% March 31, 2021
Percentage of First Nations schools with a condition rating of "good" or "new" 65% March 31, 2025
Percentage of First Nations health facilities with a condition rating of "good" 60% March 31, 2021
Number of First Nations communities located on reserves that rely on ISC funded diesel for electricity generation 24 March 31, 2025
Percentage of long-term evacuees who have returned home or have a scheduled date within two years after their evacuation 100% March 31, 2021
Departmental result: Land and resources in Indigenous communities are sustainably managed
Departmental result indicators Target Date to achieve target
Percentage of First Nations with community-led Land Use Plans 27% March 31, 2021
Percentage of First Nations communities with adequate solid waste management systems 35% March 31, 2021
Percentage high risk contaminated sites on reserve where clean-up or containment is occurring to reduce risk 35% March 31, 2021
Departmental result: Indigenous communities build economic prosperity
Departmental result indicators Target Date to achieve target
Percentage increase of Indigenous businesses created and/or expanded 2% March 31, 2021
Percentage of First Nations communities where non-federal government revenues represent 25% or more of total revenues 18% March 31, 2021

Planned budgetary financial resources for Governance and Community Development Services

2020–21 budgetary spending (as indicated in Main Estimates) 2020–21
planned spending
2021–22
planned spending
2022–23
planned spending
3,010,800,872 3,010,800,872 2,013,012,826 1,953,398,341
The year-over-year differences primarily reflect:
  • decrease in funding for infrastructure projects in indigenous communities
  • sunset (in 2021–22) of funding for the First Nations Water and Wastewater Enhanced Program and to improve monitoring and testing of on-reserve community drinking water (Budget 2016)
  • sunset (in 2021–22) of funding provided by Budget 2016 to support the Enhanced First Nations Education Infrastructure Fund

Planned human resources for Governance and Community Development Services

2020–21
planned full-time equivalents
2021–22
planned full-time equivalents
2022–23
planned full-time equivalents
1,593 1,322 1,322

Financial, human resources and performance information for the ISC Program Inventory are available in the GC InfoBase.

Indigenous Self-Determined Services

Description

These services are designed and delivered by Indigenous peoples for Indigenous peoples. They include services for which the control, authority and/or jurisdiction has been formally transferred to Indigenous communities or organizations, as supported through departmental funding.

Planning highlights

Enhancing Indigenous control over the design and delivery of services (e.g. education, health, social) is critical to realizing a future in which the Department's existence is no longer required; a stated objective in the enabling legislation that created Indigenous Services Canada. Supporting Indigenous peoples to build capacity so that their vision of self-determination can be implemented is a core part of ISC's mandate. As ISC adopts modern service delivery principles, it is expected that self-determined services will increase as more Indigenous communities become equipped to assume control or authority for service design and delivery.

To achieve progress in this area, ISC will focus on 2 departmental results.

1. Indigenous peoples control the design, delivery and management of services

ISC is committed to a modern, agile, holistic, and community-based approach to service improvements that supports Indigenous communities and organizations to exercise jurisdiction in the design, delivery and management of services. This is consistent with the Indigenous right to self-determination which is aligned with the UNDRIP and the Truth and Reconciliation Commission's Calls to Action. Policies have been introduced on the premise that greater Indigenous control over decision-making, programs and services will contribute to improvements in socio-economic outcomes. For example, the First Nations Health Authority in British Columbia was established in 2013 and fundamentally transformed how health care is delivered in that province. Other Acts, including the Mi'kmaq Education Act, the First Nations Financial Authority Act, the First Nations Land Management Act, the First Nations Commercial and Industrial Act, and An Act respecting First Nations, Inuit and Métis children, youth and families put greater decision-making authority in the hands of Indigenous leaders, and expanded their toolkit for economic development, facilitating the potential for transition out of the Indian Act.

In 2020–21, ISC will focus its efforts in the following areas.

ISC will be co-developing distinctions-based Indigenous health legislation with Indigenous partners. At the same time, ISC will continue to advance key health transformation efforts in Quebec, Ontario, Saskatchewan, and Northern Manitoba that are expected to improve regional capacity for health governance, paving the way toward self-determination. In addition, work will continue in other parts of the country to identify additional regional and sub-regional opportunities for increasing Indigenous peoples' control over health services. This includes co-chairing the Joint Métis Health Committee with Métis national and regional partners, Health Canada and the Public Health Agency.

Together with First Nations, Inuit and Métis organizations, ISC will co-develop distinctions-based community infrastructure plans to move forward with 10-year plans to address critical needs, including housing, all-weather roads, high-speed internet, health facilities, treatment centres and schools, and related operations and maintenance.

ISC is partnering with Indigenous, provincial and territorial partners on the implementation of federal legislation for child and family services which recognizes and affirms the inherent jurisdiction of Indigenous peoples in this area. While all Section 35 rights-bearing Indigenous peoples have this inherent jurisdiction, some may choose not to exercise this authority at this time, while some have already exercised their jurisdiction over child and family services. Discussions are underway with communities such as the Cowichan Tribes in British Columbia, with whom ISC signed a letter of understanding in January 2019, to chart a path towards recognizing and implementing jurisdiction over their own child and family services. In 2020–21, progress on these types of agreements is expected to continue.

ISC will continue to develop and implement regional education agreements and other First Nations-led education models that respond to the education goals and priorities set by First Nations and respect the principle of First Nations control of First Nations education. These agreements identify collaborative education service delivery strategies, and confirm how the Government of Canada can best support First Nations schools, communities and education organizations in ensuring that First Nations students receive a high quality, linguistically- and culturally-appropriate education.

Informed by the results of the Employment and Social Development Canada-led engagement process with Indigenous partners, ISC will continue participating in the process of modernizing the Youth Employment and Skills Strategy program to better promote access to skills and work experience for Indigenous youth.

ISC will also continue to work through established Permanent Bilateral Mechanisms with First Nations, Inuit and the Métis Nation to identify joint education priorities, co-develop policy, program and services options, as well as monitor progress.

To achieve the objective of transferring services, a new fiscal relationship is needed between Canada and First Nations under the Indian Act that addresses sufficiency and predictability of funding, that emphasizes accountability to First Nations citizens, and that sustainably strengthens governance and administration of First Nations as they assume greater responsibility for design and delivery of services and work towards self-determination. Therefore, ISC will continue to provide more funding flexibility and predictability to support self-determination through the continued implementation of 10-year grants, co-developed with the AFN and the First Nations Financial Management Board, for qualified First Nations.

Finally, the important work initiated in 2018 with the creation of the AFN-ISC Joint Advisory Committee on Fiscal Relations will continue. The Committee's advice and support will also inform the continued co-development of a mutual accountability framework, including engagement with First Nations partners to finalize a National Outcome-Based Framework, which aims to measure and track the closure of socio-economic gaps more comprehensively; as well as continue advancements in co-developed First Nations-led audit and statistical functions.

2. Indigenous self-determined services are improving outcomes for communities

Ultimately, Indigenous self-determined services are about restoring control to where it always should have remained while improving outcomes for communities through the elimination of the unacceptable socio-economic gaps that exist between Indigenous peoples and other Canadians. In 2020–21, self-determined services will provide greater agility for First Nations to address local needs, advancing the objective of improving the socio-economic conditions and quality of life in First Nations communities.

As more services are designed and delivered by Indigenous peoples for Indigenous peoples and the Indigenous right to self-determination is affirmed, ISC's continued role will be to support Indigenous peoples in their priorities and efforts to improve outcomes for the benefit of their communities. In 2020–21, ISC will:

  • Continue supporting co-development initiatives to transfer service design and delivery and affirm jurisdiction in Indigenous communities and organizations in the areas of education and health, as well as in new services areas such as housing and water infrastructure.
  • Support First Nations' information and data governance, and pursue the development of mutual accountability frameworks with First Nations.
  • Continue to explore data governance and sharing partnerships and/or arrangements in specific service areas such as education.
  • Continue to work with First Nations partners on the co-development of a National Outcome-Based Framework to measure and track closure of the socio-economic gaps between First Nations and non-Indigenous Canadians.

Gender-Based Analysis Plus (GBA+)

In 2020–21, ISC will rely on practices rooted in the co-developed principles of mutual accountability, including the co-development of a National Outcome-Based Framework, which should allow for gender-disaggregated analysis at the national level. ISC will co-develop approaches to address gender considerations in reporting with linkages to the United Nations SDGs, including by identifying and taking steps to address data gaps.

Risk

ISC's ongoing service modernization requires a fundamental shift in the Department's culture, towards a model based on partnership and anchored in co-development and co-management, leading to the ultimate objective of autonomous service delivery. There is a risk that the processes, services and behaviours of ISC may not adapt in a way that is supportive of partnerships and nation-to-nation relationships. This risk is being managed by the implementation of a departmental strategic plan and other supportive change-related initiatives including cultural competency training, active engagement of Indigenous partners in co-development, communication and governance.

Planned results for Indigenous Self-Determined Services

Departmental Result: Indigenous peoples control the design, delivery and management of services
Departmental result indicators Target Date to achieve target
Number of eligible First Nations communities that have opted in to a grant to support the new fiscal relationship 115a March 31, 2021
Number of First Nations communities that have opted in to a self-determined service agreement To be established by March 2020b To be established by March 2020

a This target includes the 85 First Nations who signed grant agreements in 2019–20, and is based on preliminary analysis of an anticipated 30 new grant agreements being signed by eligible First Nations for 2020–21.

b This is a new indicator; target to be established after the first year of reporting when data becomes available. In the meantime, ISC will aim to achieve an increase.

Departmental Result: Indigenous self-determined services are improving outcomes for communities
Departmental result indicators Target Date to achieve target
Average Community Well-Being index score for First Nations communities in a New Fiscal Relationship funding agreement To be established with partnersa To be established with partners
Average Community Well-Being (education score) for First Nations communities in a self-determined services agreement To be established by March 2020a To be established by March 2020
Percentage of British Columbia First Nations adults reporting that their health is excellent or very good To be established by March 2020a To be established by March 2020
Percentage of First Nations communities with access to mental wellness team services Not applicableb Not applicableb
Percentage of residents living on reserve who are supported through Income Assistance Not applicableb Not applicableb
Percentage of First Nations on reserve students who graduate from secondary school Not applicableb Not applicableb
Percentage of First Nations housing that is adequate as assessed and reported by First Nations Not applicableb Not applicableb

a This is a new indicator; target to be established with partners when sufficient data becomes available. In the meantime, ISC will aim to achieve an increase.

b The establishment of targets is not relevant within the context of self-determined services whereby First Nations have the flexibility to design and deliver services based on their own plans and priorities. The results for these indicators will however be reported in the 2020–21 ISC Departmental Results Report.

Planned budgetary financial resources for Indigenous Self-Determined Services

2020–21 budgetary spending (as indicated in Main Estimates) 2020–21
planned spending
2021–22
planned spending
2022–23
planned spending
2,369,018,506 2,369,018,506 2,415,647,496 2,464,294,624
The year-over-year differences reflect changes in the approved funding profile to support the new fiscal relationship with First Nations as well as increase in funding for the British Columbia Tripartite Health Governance.

Planned human resources for Indigenous Self-Determined Services

2020–21
planned full-time equivalents
2021–22
planned full-time equivalents
2022–23
planned full-time equivalents
0 0 0

Financial, human resources and performance information for the ISC Program Inventory are available in the GC InfoBase.

United Nations' 2030 agenda and sustainable development goals

ISC is actively working with other departments on the development of a whole-of-society National Strategy for the advancement of the Sustainable Development Goals (SDG) in Canada. During the past few years, our department has worked with Employment and Social Development Canada and with Statistics Canada on drafting the National Strategy towards the implementation of the UN 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development, on reviewing the project proposals for the SDG funding program, on supporting Canada's participation in the UN High Level Political Forum on Sustainable Development, and on the Canadian Indicator Framework.

In 2020–21, the Department will continue to work towards the incorporation of the Sustainable Development Goals into our departmental planning, and ultimately into our operations. Internally, the Strategic Policy and Partnerships sector will coordinate working-level meetings on the implementation of the SDGs and facilitate intra-sector progress on specific goals.

Internal Services: planned results

Description

Internal Services are groups of related activities and resources that the federal government considers to be services in support of Programs and/or required to meet an organization's corporate obligations. Internal Services refers to the activities and resources of 10 distinct services that support Program delivery in the organization, regardless of the Internal Services delivery model in a Department. These services are:

  • Management and Oversight Services
  • Communications Services
  • Legal Services
  • Human Resources Management Services
  • Financial Management Services
  • Information Management Services
  • Information Technology Services
  • Real Property Management Services
  • Materiel Management Services
  • Acquisition Management Services

Planning Highlights

ISC relies on a shared service platform with CIRNAC for many of its internal services. This arrangement provides integrated internal services to both ISC and CIRNAC, allows for the sharing of information and expertise, and promotes the smooth functioning of both departments.

Improved integrated planning and alignment of priorities to risks and results, together with mechanisms for ongoing oversight, is helping ISC ensure the appropriate use of human and financial services, and the relevance, efficiency, and effectiveness of programs and services to our Indigenous clients. ISC is working to promote greater accountability, transparency and oversight in its operations by conducting internal audits, evaluations, financial reviews and risk assessments.

ISC is fully committed to increasing the representation of Indigenous employees at all levels of the Department, and internal services is no exception. Through its redesigned service delivery model ISC will develop and implement comprehensive Indigenous recruitment, development and retention programs. Various Indigenous recruitment programs have recently been consolidated within the newly-created Directorate of Indigenous Programs, which will advance the recruitment and retention of Indigenous employees throughout the organization. ISC will continue to staff positions in a transparent manner, based on merit and respect for the principles of gender equity and diversity.

To accommodate legislative reforms to the Canada Labour Code, ISC has restructured its supports for Occupational Health and Safety initiatives to improve services where interdependencies between harassment and Occupational Health and Safety exist.

Under the proposed Accessible Canada Act, ISC will ensure a plan is in place to identify and remove accessibility barriers and prevent new barriers for persons with disabilities, especially pertaining to job opportunities and employment policies and practices.

A new Centre for Abilities Management and Workplace Wellness Programs will implement the 2018 to 2021 ISC Workplace Well-being & Mental Health Strategy, including the provision of Mental Health First Aid training.

ISC will also contribute to the stabilization of the HR to Pay system by onboarding to the enterprise human resources management system (MyGCHR) in the spring of 2020. This will further help to consolidate systems to transition to the Next Generation HR to Pay solution.

ISC is supporting implementation of Treasury Board's Policy on Transfer Payments, which are an important instrument to achieve our desired outcomes for Canadians, in a manner that supports and aligns with the mandates of both ISC and CIRNAC.

In support of the digital government vision, ISC is continuing the vital work required to modernize its IM/IT solutions, to address risks, and simultaneously strengthen its ability to deliver on its commitments. The importance of effective services and solution delivery for ISC is heightened given the unique challenges that exist across remote locations in Canada, including the North. Specifically, ISC will continue to focus on the implementation of core IM/IT components required to provide employees with the tools and technology they need to do their jobs effectively; setting the stage for managing a decentralized workforce. ISC will also continue to work closely with internal enterprise service organizations such as Shared Services Canada, Public Services and Procurement Canada, and the Canada School of Public Service in order to modernize service delivery, improve sustainability and promote digital government.

Finally, ISC is working with CIRNAC partners to lead the real property management action plan in order to mitigate health and safety risks and enhance the sound stewardship of Crown assets.

Planned budgetary financial resources for Internal Services

2020–21 budgetary spending (as indicated in Main Estimates) 2020–21
planned spending
2021–22
planned spending
2022–23
planned spending
170,639,148 170,639,148 153,242,015 150,987,182
The year-over-year differences reflect changes in the approved funding profile for internal support services.

Planned human resources for Internal Services

2020–21
planned full-time equivalents
2021–22
planned full-time equivalents
2022–23
planned full-time equivalents
1,366 1,322 1,296

Spending and human resources

This section provides an overview of ISC's planned spending and human resources for the next three consecutive fiscal years, and compares planned spending for the upcoming year with the current and previous years' actual spending.

Planned spending

The following graph presents planned (voted and statutory) spending over time.

Departmental spending trend graph
Text alternative for the graph Departmental spending trend

This stacked bar graph depicts spending from 2017–18 to 2022–23:

  • Total spending in 2017–18 is $4,288 million. Of this amount, $4,238 million is voted spending and $49 million is statutory spending.
  • Total spending in 2018–19 is $11,587 million. Of this amount, $11,506 million is voted spending and $81 million is statutory spending.
  • Total spending in 2019–20 is $13,771 million. Of this amount, $13,645 million is voted spending and $126 million is statutory spending.
  • Total spending in 2020–21 is $12,812 million. Of this amount, $12,698 million is voted spending and $115 million is statutory spending.
  • Total spending in 2021–22 is $11,959 million. Of this amount, $11,848 million is voted spending and $111 million is statutory spending.
  • Total spending in 2022–23 is $11,797 million. Of this amount, $11,687 million is voted spending and $110 million is statutory spending.

* ISC was established on November 30, 2017. Therefore, the 2017–18 expenditures column represents a partial year from November 30, 2017 to March 31, 2018.

Budgetary planning summary for core responsibilities and Internal Services (dollars)

The following table shows actual, forecast and planned spending for each of ISC's core responsibilities and for Internal Services for the years relevant to the current planning year.

Core responsibilities and Internal Services 2017–18 expenditures1 2018–19 expenditures1 2019–20 forecast spending 2020–21 budgetary spending (as indicated in Main Estimates) 2020–21 planned spending 2021–22 planned spending 2022–23 planned spending
Services and Benefits to Individuals 648,354,601 1,678,872,561 2,061,536,339 1,835,650,316 1,835,650,316 1,896,999,215 1,982,532,986
Health and Social Services 1,927,149,993 6,208,068,152 6,856,828,135 5,426,092,193 5,426,092,193 5,480,367,554 5,246,073,757
Governance and Community Development Services 1,524,992,985 3,062,438,396 3,325,231,538 3,010,800,872 3,010,800,872 2,013,012,826 1,953,398,341
Indigenous Self-Determined Services 116,729,933 491,076,435 1,301,854,667 2,369,018,506 2,369,018,506 2,415,647,496 2,464,294,624
Amount not allocated to the above core responsibilities2 45,141,500 N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A
Subtotal 4,262,369,012 11,440,455,544 13,545,450,679 12,641,561,887 12,641,561,887 11,806,027,091 11,646,299,708
Internal Services 25,429,592 146,561,915 225,854,322 170,639,148 170,639,148 153,242,015 150,987,182
Total 4,287,798,604 11,587,017,459 13,771,305,001 12,812,201,035 12,812,201,035 11,959,269,106 11,797,286,890

1 ISC was established on November 30, 2017. Therefore, the 2017–18 expenditures column represents a partial year from November 30, 2017 to March 31, 2018. The 2017–18 and 2018–19 expenditures have been restated from the Program Alignment Architecture to reflect the 2019–20 Departmental Results Framework.

2 The 2017–18 expenditures under "Amount not allocated to the above core responsibilities" is related to actual expenditures under the Other Claims Program.

The spending trend shown in the table above reflects the partial year of expenditures in 2017–18 as ISC was established on November 30, 2017.

The 2018–19 expenditures are significantly higher than the 2017–18 expenditures as it reflects full year of expenditures compared to the partial year of expenditures in 2017–18.

Spending is expected to increase by $1,225.2 million between 2018–19 expenditures and 2020–21 planning spending. This is mainly due to:

  • Increase in funding related to the transfer from CIRNAC primarily for Individuals Affairs, Lands and Economic Development programs and internal services as per Order in Council P.C. 2019-1109.
  • Net increase in funding for the elementary and secondary as well as post-secondary education programs.
  • Net increase in the approved funding profile for the non-insured health benefits for First Nations and Inuit.
  • Increase in funding for infrastructure projects in Indigenous communities.

Spending is expected to decrease by $1,014.9 million between 2020–21 and 2022–23 planning spending. This is mainly due to:

  • Sunset (in 2021–22) of funding for the First Nations Water and Wastewater Enhanced Program and to improve monitoring and testing of on-reserve community drinking water (Budget 2016).
  • Decrease in funding for infrastructure projects in indigenous communities.
  • Decrease in funding for the continued implementation of Jordan's Principle and supporting Inuit children through the Inuit Child First Initiative.
  • Sunset (in 2021–22) of funding provided by Budget 2016 to support the Enhanced First Nations Education Infrastructure Fund.
  • Net increase in the approved funding profile for the non-insured health benefits for First Nations and Inuit.
  • Net increase in funding for the elementary and secondary as well as post-secondary education programs.

Decisions on the renewal of the sunset initiatives will be taken in future budgets and reflected in future estimates.

2020–21 Budgetary planned gross spending summary (dollars)

Core responsibilities and Internal Services 2020–21
planned gross spending
2020–21
planned revenues netted against expenditures
2020–21
planned net spending
Services and Benefits to Individuals 2,015,820,104 (180,169,788) 1,835,650,316
Health and Social Services 5,426,409,358 (317,165) 5,426,092,193
Governance and Community Development Services 3,010,800,872 0 3,010,800,872
Indigenous Self-Determined Services 2,369,018,506 0 2,369,018,506
Subtotal 12,822,048,840 (180,486,953) 12,641,561,887
Internal Services 215,511,148 (44,872,000) 170,639,148
Total 13,037,559,988 (225,358,953) 12,812,201,035

Planned human resources

The following table shows actual, forecast and planned full-time equivalents (FTEs) for each core responsibility in ISC's departmental results framework and for Internal Services for the years relevant to the current planning year.

Human resources planning summary for Core Responsibilities and Internal Services
Core responsibilities and Internal Services 2017–18
actual full-time equivalents*
2018–19
actual full-time equivalents
2019–20
forecast full-time equivalents
2020–21
planned full-time equivalents
2021–22
planned full-time equivalents
2022–23
planned full-time equivalents
First Nations and Inuit Health N/A 2,211 N/A N/A N/A N/A
Individuals and Families N/A 518 N/A N/A N/A N/A
Community and Regional Development N/A 828 N/A N/A N/A N/A
Services and Benefits to Individuals 470 N/A 1,413 1,509 1,509 1,509
Health and Social Services 524 N/A 1,331 1,490 1,391 1,238
Governance and Community Development Services 339 N/A 1,423 1,593 1,322 1,322
Indigenous Self-Determined Services N/A N/A 13 0 0 0
Subtotal 1,333 3,557 4,179 4,592 4,222 4,069
Internal Services 119 653 1,359 1,366 1,322 1,296
Total 1,452 4,210 5,538 5,958 5,544 5,365
* ISC was established on November 30, 2017. Therefore, the 2017–18 actual FTE column represents a partial year from November 30, 2017 to March 31, 2018. The 2017–18 actual FTE has been restated from the Program Alignment Architecture to reflect the 2019–20 Departmental Results Framework.

Estimates by vote

Information on ISC's organizational appropriations is available in the 2020–21 Main Estimates.

Future-Oriented Condensed Statement of Operations

The condensed future oriented statement of operations provides an overview of ISC's operations for 2019–20 to 2020–21.

The amounts for forecast and planned results in this statement of operations were prepared on an accrual basis. The amounts for forecast and planned spending presented in other sections of the Departmental Plan were prepared on an expenditure basis. Amounts may therefore differ.

A more detailed future-oriented statement of operations and associated notes, including a reconciliation of the net cost of operations to the requested authorities, are available on ISC's website.

Condensed future-oriented statement of operations for the year ending March 31, 2021 (dollars)
Financial information 2019–20 forecast results 2020–21 planned results Difference (2020–21 planned results minus 2019–20 forecast results)
Total expenses 13,969,060,990 13,007,831,025 (961,229,965)
Total revenues 189,188,266 225,368,777 36,180,511
Net cost of operations before government funding and transfers 13,779,872,724 12,782,462,248 (997,410,476)

Expenses

Total expenses for 2020–21 are planned at $13,008 million, representing a $961 million decrease from the previous year's forecasted total expenses of $13,969 million. Expenses by core responsibility are as follows:

  • Health and Social Services $5,371 million (41%)
  • Governance and Community Development $2,993 million (23%)
  • Indigenous Self-determined Service $2,369 million (18%)
  • Service and Benefits to Individuals $2,038 million (16%)

The remainder of the total expenses includes Internal Services in the amount of $237 million (2%).

Revenues

Total revenues for 2020–21 are planned at $225.4 million, representing a $36.2 million increase over the previous year's total revenues of $189.2 million. Re-spendable revenues represent $180.5 million (80% of total revenues) and revenues from the provision of Finance and administrative services represent $44.9 million (20% of total revenues).

Corporate information

Organizational profile

Appropriate minister: The Honourable Marc Miller

Ministerial portfolio: Department of Indigenous Services Canada

Enabling instrument: Department of Indigenous Services Act, S.C. 2019, c. 29, s. 336.

Year of incorporation: 2019

Special operating agency: Indian Oil and Gas Canada

  • Enabling instrument: Indian Oil and Gas Act, S.C., 1985, c.I-7.

Adjudicative and advisory bodies: National Indigenous Economic Development Board

Raison d'être, mandate and role: who we are and what we do

"Raison d'être, mandate and role: who we are and what we do" is available on ISC's website.

For more information on ISC's organizational mandate letter commitments, see the Minister's mandate letter.

Operating context

Information on the operating context is available on the ISC's website.

Reporting framework

The ISC approved departmental results framework and program inventory of record for 2020–21 are as follows.

Core responsibility: Services and Benefits to Individuals

These services and benefits are mainly delivered directly to Indigenous people by the Department. They include, among other services and benefits, individual First Nations and Inuit clinical care and health-related benefits such as pharmacy, dental and vision care. The Department is also responsible for determining individuals' entitlement to Indian registration and for the issuance of various proofs of registration, including the Secure Certificate of Indian Status (SCIS), which can be used to access various programs and services.

Departmental Result Indicators Program inventory
Quality and timely services are delivered directly to Indigenous people Percentage of First Nations adults who rate the quality of health care services delivered in their community as good or excellent
  • Supplementary Health Benefits
  • Clinical and Client Care
  • Community Oral Health Services
  • Individual Affairs
Percentage of prior approval requests for medication coverage completed within 24 hours
Percentage of eligible First Nations and Inuit who received at least one non-insured health benefit in a year
Percentage of eligible applicants issued a Secure Certificate of Indian Status within 16 weeks from the application date
Health services delivered to Indigenous people contribute to improved health outcomes Percentage of First Nations and Inuit adults who reported being in very good or excellent health

Core responsibility: Health and Social Services

These services are primarily delivered in partnership with Indigenous communities and organizations, provinces/territories and agencies. Together, they focus on health and well-being for Indigenous people. They include health services to strengthen Indigenous communities in areas such as healthy living, communicable disease control, healthy child development and community care. They also include social services with an emphasis on children and families, as well as education services from kindergarten to post-secondary.

Departmental Result Indicators Program inventory
Indigenous people and communities are healthier Active tuberculosis incidence rate among Inuit living in Inuit Nunangat
  • Jordan's Principle
  • Mental Wellness
  • Healthy Living
  • Healthy Child Development
  • Home and Community Care
  • Health Human Resources
  • Environmental Public Health
  • Communicable Diseases Control and Management
  • Education
  • Income Assistance
  • Assisted Living
  • First Nations Child and Family Services
  • Family Violence Prevention
  • Urban Programming for Indigenous Peoples
Active tuberculosis incidence rate among First Nations on reserve
Rate of newly reported cases of HIV among First Nations
Percentage of First Nations adults with diabetes accessing newer, novel medications and not on insulin
Indigenous people receive social services that respond to community needs Percentage of First Nations and Inuit communities with access to mental wellness team services
Percentage of First Nations communities offering family support services aimed at keeping families together
Percentage of First Nations children on reserve in care
Percentage of residents living on reserve who are supported through Income Assistance
Number of individuals who received services under Urban Programming for Indigenous Peoples
Indigenous students receive an inclusive and quality education Number of First Nations students who are provided full-day kindergarten services in First Nations administered schools
Percentage of students attending First Nations administered schools who are taught at least one subject in a First Nations language
Percentage of First Nations on reserve students who graduate from secondary school
Number of funded First Nations, Inuit and Métis students who graduate with a post-secondary degree/diploma/ certificate

Core responsibility: Governance and Community Development Services

These services are commonly delivered in partnership with Indigenous communities and institutions and are focused on strong community governance and physical foundations. They include supports for governance capacity in areas such as community planning and financial management. They also include support for investments in community infrastructure, land and resource management, and economic development.

Departmental Result Indicators Program inventory
Indigenous communities advance their governance capacity Percentage of First Nations with a completed community-led plan
  • Health Facilities
  • e-Health Infostructure
  • Health Planning, Quality Management and Systems Integration
  • Indigenous Governance and Capacity
  • Water and Wastewater
  • Education Facilities
  • Housing
  • Other Community Infrastructure and Activities
  • Emergency Management Assistance
  • Indigenous Entrepreneurship and Business Development
  • Economic Development Capacity and Readiness
  • Lands, Natural Resources and Environmental Management
  • Statutory, Legislative and Policy Support to First Nations Governance
Indigenous peoples have reliable and sustainable infrastructure Number of long-term drinking water advisories affecting public water systems on reserve
Percentage of First Nations housing that is adequate as assessed and reported by First Nations
Percentage of First Nations schools with a condition rating of "good" or "new"
Percentage of First Nations health facilities with a condition rating of "good"
Number of First Nations communities located on reserves that rely on ISC funded diesel for electricity generation
Percentage of long-term evacuees who have returned home or have a scheduled date within two years after their evacuation
Land and resources in Indigenous communities are sustainably managed Percentage of First Nations with community-led Land Use Plans
Percentage of First Nations communities with adequate solid waste management systems
Percentage of high risk contaminated sites on reserve where clean-up or containment is occurring to reduce risk
Indigenous communities build economic prosperity Percentage increase of Indigenous businesses created and/or expanded
Percentage of First Nations communities where non-federal government revenues represent 25% or more of total revenues

Core responsibility : Indigenous Self-Determined Services

These services are designed and delivered by Indigenous peoples for Indigenous peoples. They include services for which the control, authority and/or jurisdiction has been formally transferred to Indigenous communities or organizations, as supported through departmental funding.

Departmental Result Indicators Program inventory
Indigenous peoples control the design, delivery and management of services Number of eligible First Nations communities that have opted in to a grant to support the new fiscal relationship
  • New Fiscal Relationship
  • Self-Determined Services
  • BC Tripartite Health Governance
Number of First Nations communities that have opted in to a self-determined service agreement
Indigenous self-determined services are improving outcomes for communities Average Community Well-Being index score for First Nations communities in a New Fiscal Relationship funding agreement
Average Community Well-Being (education score) for First Nations communities in a self-determined services agreement
Percentage of British Columbia First Nations adults reporting that their health is excellent or very good
Percentage of First Nations communities with access to mental wellness team services
Percentage of residents living on reserve who are supported through Income Assistance
Percentage of First Nations on reserve students who graduate from secondary school
Percentage of First Nations housing that is adequate as assessed and reported by First Nations

Changes to the approved reporting framework since 2019–20

Structure 2020–21 2019–20 Change Rational for change
Core Responsibility 1 Services and benefits to Individuals Services and benefits to Individuals No change Not applicable
Programs Supplementary Health Benefits Supplementary Health Benefits No change Not applicable
Clinical and Client Care Clinical and Client Care No change Not applicable
Community Oral Health Services Community Oral Health Services No change Not applicable
Individual Affairs Not applicable New program Transferred from CIRNAC to ISC
Structure 2020–21 2019–20 Change Rational for change
Core Responsibility 2 Health and Social Services Health and Social Services No change Not applicable
Programs Education Education No change Not applicable
Income Assistance Income Assistance No change Not applicable
Assisted Living Assisted Living No change Not applicable
First Nations Child and Family Services First Nations Child and Family Services No change Not applicable
Family Violence Prevention Family Violence Prevention No change Not applicable
Urban Programming for Indigenous Peoples Urban Programming for Indigenous Peoples No change Not applicable
Healthy Child Development Healthy Child Development No change Not applicable
Mental Wellness Mental Wellness No change Not applicable
Healthy Living Healthy Living No change Not applicable
Communicable Diseases Control and Management Communicable Diseases Control and Management No change Not applicable
Environmental Public Health Environmental Public Health No change Not applicable
Home and Community Care Home and Community Care No change Not applicable
Jordan's Principle Child First Initiative - Jordan's Principle No change Not applicable
Health Human Resources Health Human Resources No change Not applicable
Structure 2020–21 2019–20 Change Rational for change
Core Responsibility 3 Governance and Community Development Services Governance and Community Development Services No change Not applicable
Programs Indigenous Governance and Capacity Indigenous Governance and Capacity No change Not applicable
Water and Wastewater Water and Wastewater No change Not applicable
Education Facilities Education Facilities No change Not applicable
Housing Housing No change Not applicable
Other Community Infrastructure and Activities Other Community Infrastructure and Activities No change Not applicable
Emergency Management Assistance Emergency Management Assistance No change Not applicable
Health Facilities Health Facilities No change Not applicable
e-Health Infostructure e-Health Infostructure No change Not applicable
Health Planning, Quality Management and Systems Integration Health Planning, Quality Management and Systems Integration No change Not applicable
Indigenous Entrepreneurship and Business Development Indigenous Entrepreneurship and Business Development New program Transferred from CIRNAC to ISC
Economic Development Capacity and Readiness Economic Development Capacity and Readiness New program Transferred from CIRNAC to ISC
Lands, Natural Resources and Environmental Management Lands, Natural Resources and Environmental Management New program Transferred from CIRNAC to ISC
Statutory, Legislative and Policy Support to First Nations Governance Statutory, Legislative and Policy Support to First Nations Governance New program Transferred from CIRNAC to ISC
Structure 2020–21 2019–20 Change Rational for change
Core Responsibility 4 Indigenous Self-Determined Services Indigenous Self-Determined Services No change Not applicable
Programs New Fiscal Relationship New Fiscal Relationship No change Not applicable
Self-Determined Services Self-Determined Services No change Not applicable
BC Tripartite Health Governance BC Tripartite Health Governance No change Not applicable

Note: All changes were made to reflect the July 21, 2019 Order in Council, which transferred CIRNAC programs to ISC.

Supporting information on the Program Inventory

Supporting information on planned expenditures, human resources, and results related to ISC's program inventory is available in the GC InfoBase.

Supplementary information tables

The following supplementary information tables are available on ISC's website.

Federal tax expenditures

ISC's Departmental Plan does not include information on tax expenditures that relate to its planned results for 2020–21.

Tax expenditures are the responsibility of the Minister of Finance, and the Department of Finance Canada publishes cost estimates and projections for government-wide tax expenditures each year in the Report on Federal Tax Expenditures. This report provides detailed information on tax expenditures, including objectives, historical background and references to related federal spending programs, as well as evaluations, research papers and gender-based analysis. The tax measures presented in this report are solely the responsibility of the Minister of Finance.

Organizational contact information

Indigenous Services Canada
Les Terrasses de la Chaudière
10 Wellington Street, North Tower
Gatineau, Quebec
Mailing Address: Ottawa, Ontario K1A 0H4
Internet: https://www.canada.ca/en/indigenous-services-canada.html
Email: aadnc.webmestre-webmaster.aandc@canada.ca

General and statistical inquiries and publication distribution
Telephone (toll-free): 1-800-567-9604
TTY (toll-free): 1-866-553-0554
Email: aadnc.infopubs.aandc@canada.ca

Departmental library
Telephone: 819-997-0811
Email: aadnc.reference.aandc@canada.ca

Media inquiries — Communications
Telephone: 819-953-1160
Email: SAC.media.ISC@canada.ca

Appendix: definitions

appropriation (crédit)
Any authority of Parliament to pay money out of the Consolidated Revenue Fund.

budgetary expenditures (dépenses budgétaires)
Operating and capital expenditures; transfer payments to other levels of government, organizations or individuals; and payments to Crown corporations.

core responsibility (responsabilité essentielle)
An enduring function or role performed by a department. The intentions of the department with respect to a core responsibility are reflected in one or more related departmental results that the department seeks to contribute to or influence.

Departmental Plan (plan ministériel)
A report on the plans and expected performance of a department over a 3-year period. Departmental Plans are tabled in Parliament each spring.

departmental priority (priorité ministérielle)
A plan or project that a department has chosen to focus and report on during the planning period. Departmental priorities represent the things that are most important or what must be done first to support the achievement of the desired departmental results.

departmental result (résultat ministériel)
A consequence or outcome that a department seeks to achieve. A departmental result is often outside departments' immediate control, but it should be influenced by program-level outcomes.

departmental result indicator (indicateur de résultat ministériel)
A factor or variable that provides a valid and reliable means to measure or describe progress on a departmental result.

departmental results framework (cadre ministériel des résultats)
A framework that consists of the department's core responsibilities, departmental results and departmental result indicators.

Departmental Results Report (rapport sur les résultats ministériels)
A report on a department's actual accomplishments against the plans, priorities and expected results set out in the corresponding Departmental Plan.

experimentation (expérimentation)
Also known as results-based innovation. The conducting of activities that seek to first explore, then test and compare, the effects and impacts of policies and interventions in order to inform evidence-based decision-making, and improve outcomes for Canadians, by learning what works and what doesn't. Experimentation is related to, but distinct form innovation (the trying of new things), because it involves a rigorous comparison of results. For example, using a new website to communicate with Canadians can be an innovation; systematically testing the new website against existing outreach tools or an old website to see which one leads to more engagement, is experimentation.

full time equivalent (équivalent temps plein)
A measure of the extent to which an employee represents a full person year charge against a departmental budget. Full time equivalents are calculated as a ratio of assigned hours of work to scheduled hours of work. Scheduled hours of work are set out in collective agreements.

gender-based analysis plus (GBA+) (analyse comparative entre les sexes plus [ACS+])
An analytical process used to assess how diverse groups of women, men and gender-diverse people experience policies, programs and services based on multiple factors including race, ethnicity, religion, age, and mental or physical disability.

government-wide priorities (priorités pangouvernementales)
For the purpose of the 2020–21 Departmental Plan, government-wide priorities refer to those high-level themes outlining the government's agenda in the 2015 Speech from the Throne, namely: Growth for the Middle Class; Open and Transparent Government; A Clean Environment and a Strong Economy; Diversity is Canada's Strength; and Security and Opportunity.

horizontal initiative (initiative horizontale)
An initiative in which two or more federal organizations are given funding to pursue a shared outcome, often linked to a government priority.

non budgetary expenditures (dépenses non budgétaires)
Net outlays and receipts related to loans, investments and advances, which change the composition of the financial assets of the Government of Canada.

performance (rendement)
What an organization did with its resources to achieve its results, how well those results compare to what the organization intended to achieve, and how well lessons learned have been identified.

performance indicator (indicateur de rendement)
A qualitative or quantitative means of measuring an output or outcome, with the intention of gauging the performance of an organization, program, policy or initiative respecting expected results.

performance reporting (production de rapports sur le rendement)
The process of communicating evidence based performance information. Performance reporting supports decision-making, accountability and transparency.

plan (plan)
The articulation of strategic choices, which provides information on how an organization intends to achieve its priorities and associated results. Generally, a plan will explain the logic behind the strategies chosen and tend to focus on actions that lead up to the expected result.

planned spending (dépenses prévues)
For Departmental Plans and Departmental Results Reports, planned spending refers to those amounts presented in the Main Estimates.

A department is expected to be aware of the authorities that it has sought and received. The determination of planned spending is a departmental responsibility, and departments must be able to defend the expenditure and accrual numbers presented in their Departmental Plans and Departmental Results Reports.

program (programme)
Individual or groups of services, activities or combinations thereof that are managed together within the department and focus on a specific set of outputs, outcomes or service levels.

program inventory (répertoire des programmes)
Identifies all of the department's programs and describes how resources are organized to contribute to the department's core responsibilities and results.

result (résultat)
An external consequence attributed, in part, to an organization, policy, program or initiative. Results are not within the control of a single organization, policy, program or initiative; instead they are within the area of the organization's influence.

statutory expenditures (dépenses législatives)
Expenditures that Parliament has approved through legislation other than appropriation acts. The legislation sets out the purpose of the expenditures and the terms and conditions under which they may be made.

strategic outcome (résultat stratégique)
A long-term and enduring benefit to Canadians that is linked to the organization's mandate, vision and core functions.

target (cible)
A measurable performance or success level that an organization, program or initiative plans to achieve within a specified time period. Targets can be either quantitative or qualitative.

voted expenditures (dépenses votées)
Expenditures that Parliament approves annually through an Appropriation Act. The vote wording becomes the governing conditions under which these expenditures may be made.

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