Preventing short-term drinking water advisories from becoming long-term

First Nations and Indigenous Services Canada (ISC) work collaboratively to resolve short-term drinking water advisories before they become long-term.

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Solving short-term drinking water advisories

A drinking water advisory warns community residents that the water may be unsafe, or is known to be unsafe.

The First Nation decides how to proceed, based on recommendations from a variety of sources including local water operators (employed by the First Nation) and environmental public health officers (employed by ISC or First Nations organizations).

Once a short-term advisory is issued, the local water operator may identify and address the problem immediately, or the First Nation may request support from:

A community may also issue an advisory when it does not have:

Most of these situations are resolved quickly. Some advisories only last for a few hours or a few days.

If advisories last for more than a year they become long-term advisories. These are usually caused by more complex issues that take more time to resolve.

Preventing advisories from becoming long-term

First Nations and ISC are working together to resolve short-term drinking water advisories before they become long-term.

Solutions include:

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