COVID-19 communication resources for community health and safety

About the resources

If you are receiving enquiries from people who have questions about community safety and COVID-19, this resources page may help you:

This page contains:

The advice and examples provided here have been developed with the understanding that each community is unique in the way it shares information with its members. Communities are encouraged to adapt the messages and strategies to meet the needs of their members.

Mental wellness resources

Resources and public service announcements focusing on maintaining mental wellness during challenging times.

Resources

Indigenous Services Canada resources:

Additional resources:

Emergency communications resources

Resources to support your community's emergency response to a COVID-19 outbreak.

Emergency outbreak poster

Download this customizable poster to alert your community members about a COVID-19 outbreak, providing instructions on what to do and how to get help.

Text: EMERGENCY – Community COVID-19 Outbreak

What you should do:

  1. Stay home when you're sick
  2. Wear a well-fitting respirator or mask in public indoor spaces
  3. Improve indoor ventilation
  4. Wash your hands regularly
  5. Cough or sneeze into a tissue or the bend of your arm
  6. If you are experiencing severe symptoms, call:

How to get help:
For testing:
Call:
Visit:

For masks and hand sanitizer:

Call:
Visit:

For further assistance call:

Download the PDF for the Emergency outbreak poster

Community emergency social media posts

Use the adaptable text and imagery to share information about an emergency in your community on social media.

POST 1: Alerting the community of the emergency

[INSERT NAME OF FIRST NATION/COMMUNITY] is currently experiencing a COVID-19 outbreak. As of [ INSERT DATE], there are [INSERT NUMBER OF CONFIRMED CASES] confirmed and [INSERT NUMBER OF ACTIVE CASES] active cases, including [INSERT NUMBER OF HOSPITALIZATIONS] hospitalizations.

To help protect our community, practice physical distancing, avoid gathering indoors and stay home if you feel sick.

  • If you need medical attention call [INSERT PHONE NUMBER].
  • If you are unable to leave home and need help with supplies call [INSERT PHONE NUMBER].
  • If you need a rapid test, masks or hand sanitizers visit the [INSERT LOCATION] or call [INSERT PHONE NUMBER].

We will continue to update you here as the situation progresses.

POST 2: Providing guidance and support

[INSERT NAME OF FIRST NATION/COMMUNITY] is still working to manage the COVID-19 outbreak.

  • If you need medical attention call [INSERT PHONE NUMBER].
  • If you are unable to leave home and need help call [INSERT PHONE NUMBER].
  • If you need a rapid test, masks and hand sanitizers visit the [INSERT LOCATION] or call [INSERT PHONE NUMBER].

We will continue to update you here as the situation progresses.

Vaccines (including pediatric vaccines)

COVID-19 vaccine posters are available in various Indigenous languages:

Social media promotional materials

These images can be used to complement your social media content.

Vaccines for children 6 months to 5 years old: Vaccines are the best defense against COVID-19

Being vaccinated could be the difference between a mild illness, like a runny nose, and a severe infection forcing a trip to the emergency room. Even if your child has had COVID-19 in the past, vaccines provide stronger and longer-lasting protection.

It is normal to have questions about your child's health. If you are unsure about the COVID-19 vaccine for your child, speak with a trusted healthcare provider.

For more information visit: canada.ca/covid-vaccines-indigenous.

Vaccines for children 6 months to 5 years old: Vaccines can protect against serious COVID-19 illness

Serious complications are rare but can happen with COVID-19 infection. Getting your child vaccinated can help prevent serious complications from COVID-19.

It is normal to have questions about your child's health. If you are unsure about the COVID-19 vaccine for your child, speak with a trusted healthcare provider.

For more information visit: canada.ca/covid-vaccines-indigenous.

Vaccines for children 6 months to 5 years old: Vaccines add a layer of protection against COVID-19

Vaccines are one of the tools that protect you and your community as we spend more time indoors with others. COVID-19 vaccines reduce the chance of severe illness and hospitalizations, protecting people around you and decreasing the pressure on healthcare resources.

It is normal to have questions about your child's health. If you are unsure about the COVID-19 vaccine for your child, speak with a trusted healthcare provider.

For more information visit: canada.ca/covid-vaccines-indigenous.

Vaccines for children 6 months to 5 years old: Vaccines are safe

Before approving COVID-19 vaccines for younger children, additional studies were done to make sure the vaccine was safe and effective for this age group, and passed safety requirements.

It is normal to have questions about your child's health. If you are unsure about the COVID-19 vaccine for your child, speak with a trusted healthcare provider.

For more information visit: canada.ca/covid-vaccines-indigenous.

Vaccines for children 6 months to 5 years old: Vaccines for children offer the similar protection as adult doses

The vaccine dose for children between 6 months and 5 years old is half the dose of the vaccine for children 6 to 11 years old. Clinical trials showed that this dosage created a similar immune response to the doses for older age groups.

It is normal to have questions about your child's health. If you are unsure about the COVID-19 vaccine for your child, speak with a trusted healthcare provider.

For more information visit: canada.ca/covid-vaccines-indigenous.

Poster for Pediatric Vaccination for Young Children

Title: Pediatric Vaccines – answers to your important questions

Sub-title: COVID-19 vaccines for children aged six months to under 5 years old are now available.

Why should my child get a COVID-19 vaccine?

Vaccination remains one of the most effective ways to reduce your child's chances of catching a serious case of COVID-19. While most children who get COVID-19 experience mild or no symptoms, even healthy children can experience severe disease or require hospitalization.

Is the vaccine safe for my child?

Side effects of COVID-19 vaccines are usually mild and go away on their own. Serious side effects are very rare.

The best protection against COVID-19 is to stay up-to-date on COVID-19 vaccines by getting all the vaccine doses, including booster doses, when recommended for you or your child.

It is safer to get the vaccine than to get COVID-19. Being vaccinated against COVID-19, even if your child has already been infected, can be the difference between a mild infection, such as runny nose, and a trip to the emergency room due to a severe infection.

Will my child experience side effects from the COVID-19 vaccine?

Common side effects from the COVID-19 vaccine are mild and similar in children as to adults.

They may include:

  • Pain at the injection site
  • Soreness in the arm
  • Chills
  • Fatigue
  • Joint pain
  • Mild fever
  • Muscle aches
  • Headache

If you are concerned about any side effects your child could experience or have questions about getting your child vaccinated against COVID-19, contact a healthcare provider for advice.

For more information visit: canada.ca/covid-vaccines-indigenous

Download the PDF for the Pediatric Vaccination for Young Children Poster

Book your booster today

1st dose

2nd dose

Booster

Stay up to date with your COVID-19 vaccination and book your booster dose today!

Sick of COVID?

Stay up to date with your COVID-19 vaccinations, including booster doses.

Can I get the vaccine if I'm pregnant?

Deciding whether to get the vaccine when you're pregnant or thinking of having a baby can be a difficult choice to make. There's so much information online that it can get a bit overwhelming. Here are some facts to help you make your decision:

  • Based on current data, there are no safety concerns for you or your baby with the COVID-19 vaccine
  • If you get COVID-19 while pregnant and unvaccinated, it can be very dangerous to your health and that of your baby
  • The National Advisory Committee on Immunization recommends that women who are pregnant or breastfeeding get an mRNA vaccine (such as Pfizer or Moderna)

Will the vaccine affect my fertility?

Fact:

  • The vaccine doesn't affect your reproductive organs, so it won't prevent you from becoming pregnant. It will only tell your body to produce an immune response when it's exposed to the COVID-19 virus

Why do I need a booster dose?

Have you ever asked yourself, "Why do I need a booster dose of the COVID-19 vaccine?"

If so, here are some facts to help you answer this question:

  • Even after being fully vaccinated, your immunity to the virus decreases over time. A booster dose will increase your body's immune response and improve your protection against COVID-19
  • With COVID-19 variants, a booster dose will also help protect you from severe COVID-19 illness

If you're eligible, it's important to get a booster dose as soon as possible.

Help boost their protection

Did you know, a recommendation from a health care professional can increase vaccination rates?

Do your patients know that over time the effectiveness of COVID-19 vaccines can decrease?

Talk to your patients today about the benefits of receiving a COVID-19 booster shot.

On the image, a nurse asks her patient: Have you received your COVID-19 booster?

Download the PDF for Help boost their protection

To up your game, a booster dose is your best ally against COVID-19 and its variants

Even after a first and second dose of a COVID-19 vaccine, your immunity to the virus can decrease overtime.

If COVID-19 is your opponent, you want to be as prepared and boosted as possible. It's been a tough battle but don't give up now!

Continue to protect yourself from COVID-19 and its variants by getting a booster.

Description of the poster

The poster imitates a "choose player" screen that typically appears in most video games.

The poster communicates that if COVID-19 was a video game and you could choose your player, you'd choose a player who was vaccinated.

Those who practice multiple public health measures and choose to be fully vaccinated, with a booster, are less likely experience severe symptoms of COVID-19.

Choose your character

Player A: does not have a COVID-19 booster and doesn't practice multiple public health measures. Their total immunity strength isn't as strong

Player B: is fully vaccinated with a booster and practices multiple public health measures. Their total immunity strength is very strong

Immunity Strength

Immunity strength is determined based on if the player is fully vaccinated with a booster and practices multiple public health measures. Red to yellow bars have poor immunity strength. Green to blue bars have good immunity strength.

Fully vaccinated: Those fully vaccinated will have better immunity strength

Booster: Those fully vaccinated will have better immunity strength

Layers public health measures: Those who practice multiple public health measures will have better immunity strength

Download the PDF for To up your game, a booster dose is your best ally against COVID-19 and its variants

Additional resources on COVID-19 vaccines

Video resources on COVID-19 vaccines

Additional resources for youth on COVID-19 vaccines

Trusted social media sources

Stay connected to our social media accounts and the Public Health Agency of Canada social media accounts:

Facebook, Instagram and YouTube

Also, consider following Dr. Theresa Tam on Twitter at @CPHO_Canada.

COVID-19 variants and conditions

Resources and information on COVID-19 variants and condition.

Online resources

Promotional materials

About post COVID-19 condition

Post COVID-19 condition

Post COVID-19 condition, also known as long COVID, is when people show physical or psychological symptoms more than 12 weeks after their initial COVID-19 infection.

About post COVID-19:
  • Post COVID-19 condition is a wide range of new, returning, or ongoing symptoms people experience after getting COVID-19
  • The condition can affect both adults and children
The most common symptoms experienced by adults are:
  • fatigue
  • memory problems
  • sleep disturbances
  • shortness of breath
  • anxiety and depression
  • general pain and discomfort
  • difficulty thinking or concentrating
  • posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD)
The most common symptoms experienced by children are:
  • fatigue
  • headaches
  • sleep problems
  • abdominal pain
  • shortness of breath
  • muscle aches and pains or joint pains
  • lack of concentration, cognitive difficulties or delirium, such as a confused or disoriented mental state

Quick fact:There is currently no agreed upon approach to diagnose and treat post COVID-19 condition. If you think you have post COVID-19 condition, talk to your health care provider about how to manage your symptoms.

How you can prevent the illness:

The best way to prevent post COVID-19 condition is to take steps to avoid getting infected. This includes getting vaccinated, including boosters, and following public health measures. Early evidence suggests that vaccination with 2 or more doses may help reduce the risk of developing post COVID-19 condition.

To help reduce the spread of COVID-19, consider:

  • wearing a mask
  • practicing physical distancing
  • washing or sanitizing your hands
  • getting vaccinated, and getting your booster if eligible

To find out more about your COVID-19 guidance in your province or territory, including how to book your vaccine, visit: canada.ca/covid-vaccines-indigenous

Download the PDF for About post COVID-19 condition

What is post COVID-19 condition?

What is post COVID-19 condition or long COVID?

Post COVID-19 condition, or long COVID, can be new, returning, or ongoing symptoms that people experience for 12 or more weeks after being infected with COVID-19. This condition can affect adults and children.

What are the most common symptoms of post COVID-19 condition?

Symptoms of post COVID-19 condition can be varied and can change over time. The most commonly reported symptoms include, but are not limited to:

  • fatigue
  • memory problems
  • sleep disturbances
  • shortness of breath
  • anxiety and depression
  • general pain and discomfort
  • difficulty thinking or concentrating
  • posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD)
How can I prevent post COVID-19 condition?

The best way to prevent post COVID-19 condition is to take measures to prevent getting infected, like:

  • wearing a mask
  • practicing physical distancing
  • washing or sanitizing your hands
  • getting vaccinated, and getting your booster if eligible

If you think you have post COVID-19 condition, talk to your health care provider about how to manage your symptoms.

What is a variant?

Variants are mutations of the virus that cause COVID-19. Variants are still considered to be COVID-19, but just different versions of the original virus.

Should I worry about the variants?

Some variants can spread more quickly and easily than the original virus. The risks of severe complications or death are much greater if you get COVID-19 than the risks of having a severe reaction after getting vaccinated, especially with the new variants.

How can I protect myself?

The best way to protect yourself from COVID-19 variants is the same way you protect yourself from the original virus. Wear a multi-layered mask (where mandated) that fits well, wash your hands with soap and water often and for at least 20 seconds or use hand sanitizer, stay home if you feel sick and get vaccinated.

Risks of COVID-19 variants

As new COVID-19 variants continue to emerge, it's important to know more about the virus, its variants and how vaccines work against them.

About the variants
  • Viruses mutate and change, causing new variants to emerge
  • COVID-19 spreads very quickly, especially some of its variants
  • Some variants are more mild than others, but hospitalizations and deaths can still occur. The severity of illness depends on:
    • your COVID-19 vaccination status
    • if you've had a prior infection
    • age
    • any underlying medical conditions

Quick fact: COVID-19 does not have to be severe to take a toll. Even mild symptoms have an impact on communities, businesses and health systems.

Remember: a virus's job is to spread, not to treat people kindly.

Download the PDF for Risks of COVID-19 variants

Public service announcements for community use

Public service announcements have been developed and recorded to remind community members to follow public health guidelines.

Scripts can be provided upon request, while recordings will be made available soon. To request scripts, contact: marketingadvertising-marketingpublicite@sac-isc.gc.ca

Once available, recordings for series 1 to 3 will be offered in the following languages, upon request:

  • English
  • French

Scripts are available upon request, in the following languages:

  • English (text found below)
  • French
  • Blackfoot
  • Denesuline
  • Eastern Ojibwe
  • Innu-aimun
  • Inuktitut (North Baffin, Syllabics)
  • Inuktitut (South Baffin, Syllabics)
  • Maliseet
  • Cree Michif
  • French Michif
  • Mi'kmaq
  • Mohawk (Eastern dialect)
  • Mohawk (Western dialect)
  • Nunatsiavummiutut
  • OjiCree (Roman orthography)
  • OjiCree (Syllabics)
  • Plains Cree
  • Swampy Cree
  • Western Ojibwe
  • Woods Cree

Radio public service announcement to promote vaccination: Series 1

Setting: Storytime around the campfire.

Child: Grandpa? Tell us again the story about how you fought off two bears and a moose?

Grandpa: (laughing)…The funny thing…the real story has nothing to do with bears. When I was younger… (trails off)

You hear Grandpa's voice trail off as Woman begins to speak to listeners

Woman: I'm so glad he got vaccinated. COVID really hit us hard. The longer he lives the better the story. (laughing)

Announcer: Whether it's your first, second, or boosters, protect your health and keep sharing your stories. Get vaccinated against COVID-19. A Message from The Government of Canada.

Radio public service announcement to promote vaccination: Series 2

Setting: Grandpa struggling doing pushups.

Woman & Child: 1…2...3 pushups, Grandpa!

Child: Three, just like me!

Grandpa: Good job Adam. I'm finally getting my strength back. COVID had me under the weather for such a long time. Glad I got vaxxed.

Woman: And, we're taking little Adam for his first dose soon!

Grandpa to Child: Did I tell you how I fought off the four bears…?

Woman: I thought it was two?

All: (Laughing, hear child the most)

Announcer: Whether it's your first, second, or boosters, protect your health and keep sharing your stories. Get vaccinated against COVID-19. A Message from The Government of Canada.

Radio public service announcement to promote vaccination: Series 3

Setting: Vaccine Clinic

Nurse: Mr. Allen?

Grandma: Oh! That's you. Please don't say anything embarrassing this time?

Grandpa: What are you talking about? The doctor loves my stories.

Grandma: Yes honey, but they need to vaccinate a lot of people. You can't hold up the line.

Grandpa: The staff makes me feel at home; I'm trying to do the same by sharing my stories.

Grandma: You're right...Remember it's only 2 bears.

Both: Laughing

Announcer: Whether it's your first, second, or boosters, protect your health and keep sharing your stories. Get vaccinated against COVID-19. A Message from The Government of Canada.

Radio public service announcement to encourage testing when visiting with vulnerable populations

Setting: Family doing rapid test

Dad: Are you sure you followed the instructions?

Teen: Yes! Why are you making us take another COVID test?

Dad: It's just a precaution. Listen, you're my kid and I want to be sure we aren't spreading COVID! Just Dad being Dad!

SOUND FX: Buzzer

Dad: Okay. It's time to check it. We're all negative!

Kid: Yes! Let's go visit Grandma. I'm sitting in the front.

Announcer: If you're feeling unwell and want to be sure, take 15-minutes and test for COVID-19. A Message from The Government of Canada.

Radio public service announcement to promote staying up to date with your vaccines and boosters

Setting: Two people talking

Voice One: OK...We got Grandpa and Grandma vaxxed. What about Auntie?

Voice Two: Auntie got vaxxed a long time ago!

Voice One: She did? How am I just finding this out?

Voice Two: Auntie has ALWAYS been a fearless leader. I got mine because she got hers.

Voice One: Well...If Auntie got it, I better go get it before she finds out I didn't. I just never did it...

Voice Two: Get it done! ...We need to protect ourselves and the community.

Announcer Whether it's your first, second, or boosters. Get vaccinated against COVID-19. A Message from The Government of Canada.

Travel

Resources and information on COVID-19 travel steps and restrictions.

Respecting personal choice

Social media promotional materials

These images can be used to complement your social media content.

A personal choice

As get-togethers become more common, you may wonder: "how can I continue to protect myself and my loved ones?"

Before attending events, think about the number of people going and go prepared.
It is normal to be anxious about the lifted restrictions.

Be kind to those around you. Don't assume someone's level of comfort, ask them instead. Here is an example:

Person 1: would you prefer if I kept distance between us?

Person 2: yes, thank you for asking.

Public events and activities: Determine how to protect yourself and others

Public events and activities

As get-togethers become more common, ask yourself these questions to determine how to protect yourself and others.

  • How many people will be there?
  • Will other people wear masks?
  • Will the people around me be uncomfortable if I don't wear a mask?
  • Are there people that are more vulnerable to COVID-19 in my surroundings?
  • Will this event be held outdoors or indoors?

Consider:

  • Wearing a well-fitting respirator or mask in public indoor settings and using caution in closed and crowded spaces
  • Attending uncrowded outdoor events
  • Staying up to date with your COVID-19 vaccinations and getting your boosters!

Remember, if you're sick or have any COVID-19 symptoms, even mild ones, you should stay home and not attend an event.

These times can be difficult and even stressful for some people, remember to always be kind to the ones around you and respect each other's choices.

Radio public service announcements

Radio script below has been drafted to remind community members to be respectful of other's personal choice.

30-second radio script

As get-togethers become more common, it's okay to feel anxious.

Remember to be kind, understanding and respectful of others' personal choices.

Before socializing with friends and family, make it a habit to ask others about their level of comfort.

Continue to protect yourself and others by practicing multiple public health measures and if eligible, get vaccinated.

For more information, visit Canada.ca/coronavirus-info-indigenous

Public health measures

Resources and information below can be used to promote the many ways to protect yourself from COVID-19.

Continue to practice individual public health measures

Continue to practice individual public health measures:

  • Stay home when you're sick
  • Wear a well-fitting respirator or mask in public indoor spaces
  • Improve indoor ventilation
  • Wash your hands regularl
  • Cough or sneeze into a tissue or the bend of your arm;
  • Clean and disinfect high-touch surfaces and objects
  • Stay up to date with your COVID-19 vaccinations and get booster doses

Download the image Continue to practice individual public health measures

Radio public service announcements

Radio script below has been drafted to remind community members to be respectful of other's personal choice with lifting restrictions.

30-second radio script

To protect yourself from COVID-19, consider applying all public health measures.

Remember to:

  • stay home if you're feeling sick
  • improve indoor airflow by opening windows when possible
  • wear a mask when recommended
  • practice physical distancing
  • wash your hands for at least 20 seconds or use hand sanitizer often

If you haven't already, get vaccinated and when eligible, get a booster dose.

Help stop the spread of COVID-19, hospitalizations and deaths.

To find out more, visit Canada.ca/coronavirus-info-indigenous

60-second radio script

To protect yourself from COVID-19, consider applying all public health measures.

Remember to:

  • stay at home if you're feeling sick
  • follow local public health guidance
  • improve indoor airflow by opening windows when possible
  • wear a mask when recommended
  • practice physical distancing
  • wash your hands for at least 20 seconds or use hand sanitizer often
  • cough or sneeze into a tissue or into your elbow

The best way to keep you and your community safe is by getting vaccinated while applying all other public health measures.

If you haven't already, get vaccinated including a booster dose as soon as you are eligible. Help stop the spread of COVID-19, hospitalizations and deaths.

To find out more, visit Canada.ca/coronavirus-info-indigenous

Online resource

Resources for parents

Learning resources about COVID-19 vaccines for parents with young children.

Online resources

Activities for kids

Teach your kids how they can protect themselves and their family against COVID-19 through interactive activities below.

Book your booster today

Colour the nurse and the child who just got their COVID-19 vaccine.

Download the PDF for Book your booster today

Keep up your COVID-19 immunity

Colour the teddy bear who just got their COVID-19 vaccine.

Download the PDF for Keep up your COVID-19 immunity

Protect yourself and your family

Circle the ways you can protect yourself and your family from the COVID-19 virus.

Download the PDF for Protect yourself and your family

Assembly of 7 Generations

The Assembly of 7 Generations is working to raise awareness on COVID-19 and vaccines among Indigenous youth across Canada. The information on their Instagram account can be re-shared to your community social media platforms.

Check out their webinars:

Other resources

To find other resources developed by Indigenous organizations or in Indigenous languages, visit:

How to access personal protective equipment for your community

Other resources developed by the Government of Canada:

Provincial and territorial resources:

Date modified: